Arnold Caplan PhD from Case Western Reserve Visits Panama

Professor Arnold Caplan from Case Western Reserve with Dr. Riordan and friends during his recent trip to Panama. Dr. Caplan is known as the “Father of the Mesenchymal Stem Cell” although these days, he prefers the term “Medicinal Signaling Cells”.

Arnold Caplan in Panama 2016

View Dr. Caplan’s Video Lectures on Mesenchymal Stem Cells

Umbilical Cord Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells Best For Clinical Applications

A recent study concluded that umbilical cord tissue is the best source for clinically utilizable mesenchymal stem cells.

Comparative Characterization of Cells from the Various Compartments of the Human Umbilical Cord Shows that the Wharton’s Jelly Compartment Provides the Best Source of Clinically Utilizable Mesenchymal Stem Cells.


Arjunan Subramanian, Chui-Yee Fong, Arijit Biswas, Ariff Bongso

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, National University of Singapore, Kent Ridge, Singapore, 119228, Singapore

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Harvesting Picture

Abstract

The human umbilical cord (UC) is an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with unique advantages over other MSC sources. They have been isolated from different compartments of the UC but there has been no rigorous comparison to identify the compartment with the best clinical utility. We compared the histology, fresh and cultured cell numbers,morphology, proliferation, viability, stemness characteristics and differentiation potential of cells from the amnion (AM), subamnion (SA), perivascular (PV), Wharton’s jelly (WJ) and mixed cord (MC) of five UCs. The WJ occupied the largest area in the UC from which 4.61 ± 0.57 x 106 /cm fresh cells could be isolated without culture compared to AM, SA, PV and MC that required culture. The WJ and PV had significantly lesser CD40+ non-stem cell contaminants (26-27%) compared to SA, AM and MC (51-70%). Cells from all compartments were proliferative, expressed the typical MSC-CD, HLA, and ESC markers, telomerase, had normal karyotypes and differentiated into adipocyte, chondrocyte and osteocyte lineages. The cells from WJ showed significantly greater CD24+ and CD108+ numbers and fluorescence intensities that discriminate between MSCs and non-stem cell mesenchymal cells, were negative for the fibroblast-specific and activating-proteins (FSP, FAP) and showed greater osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potential compared to AM, SA, PV and MC. Cells from the WJ offer the best clinical utility as (i) they have less non-stem cell contaminants (ii) can be generated in large numbers with minimal culture avoiding changes in phenotype, (iii) their derivation is quick and easy to standardize, (iv) they are rich in stemness characteristics and (v) have high differentiation potential. Our results show that when isolating MSCs from the UC, the WJ should be the preferred compartment, and a standardized method of derivation must be used so as to make meaningful comparisons of data between research groups.

The researchers considered the following factors in their in-depth analysis:

  • Fresh live cell counts
  • Cell counts after culture
  • Cell morphology
  • Cell proliferation
  • Cell viability
  • CD marker analysis
  • Telomerase analysis (TRAP assay)
  • Pluripotent marker analysis
  • Genomic markers
  • Cell differentiation
  • Degrees of differentiation

Click the link below to read the entire article.

Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Umbilical Cord Tissue Are Best in Clinical Applications

First Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy Patient To Receive Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Therapy In US Turns 30

The first patient with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy to be granted FDA approval for allogeneic adult stem cell therapy in the United States turned 30 this year, well surpassing his original life expectancy and paving the way for future patients, according to non-profit organization Coming Together For A Cure.

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patient and Stem Cell Recipient, Ryan Benton

Ryan Benton

WICHITA, KANSAS (PRWEB) MAY 18, 2016 – Ryan Benton was diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) at the age of three and given a life expectancy in the late teens to early twenties. DMD is a relatively common progressive genetic disorder, which causes aggressive deterioration of the muscles.

In 2009, at the age of 22, Benton’s condition was critical. He met with the founder of the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama and Medistem Panama, Neil H. Riordan, PhD. Research had shown that adult stem cell therapy might have the potential to reverse the progression of DMD.

Because of the laws restricting adult stem cell therapy in the United States, Benton was forced to travel to Panama to receive his first life-saving treatment. Ryan made seven trips to Panama to receive treatments from Dr. Riordan’s team of physicians at the Stem Cell Institute.

“Ryan has seen vast improvements in muscle mass and lung capacity as a result of his treatments…”

Ryan was assured at the start that there was no guarantee that we would find success but we knew it was his only hope in fighting the disease, especially since his health was at a critical point. Ryan could tell shortly after the first treatment that something was working. He found a renewed strength that he had never felt before and not once did he see any adverse side effects. He trusted Dr. Riordan and felt safe and eager to undergo additional treatments.

It took five years of hard work and successful treatments, but Benton became the first (and only) DMD patient granted FDA approval for this form of medical therapy inside the United States. An investigational new drug (IND) for compassionate use application was approved, allowing Benton to receive treatment in his hometown, Wichita, KS.

Approval from the FDA came with many stipulations, however. This form of treatment was to be used for only a single patient, twice a year for 3 years.

By all accounts, January 2016 was a major milestone. The FDA has recently granted an additional treatment per year, now allowing Ryan three total treatments per year, as well as approval for a second compassionate use IND for another patient. This second patient, a six-year-old boy, has also shown success from previous treatments in Panama. He received his first treatment in the United States this year .

Ryan and his family have been actively involved in the local muscular dystrophy community, and have personally known dozens of others with DMD who have passed away at far too young of an age. That number continues to grow each day, which only continues to frustrate Ryan and his family as they fight for this treatment to be more readily available for others suffering from the same disease. Ryan believes that if treated early enough, patients could have a strong chance to live a “normal” life. Ryan believes if he had been treated when he was six years old, it could be very likely that he would never have faced any of the diseases debilitating effects.

Ryan has seen vast improvements in muscle mass and lung capacity as a result of his treatments, but we believe additional treatments on a more frequent basis would help ensure maximum potential when it comes to reversing the progression of his disease. Immediately following each round of treatment, we see dramatic increases in his overall health, stamina, physical strength, and ease in ability to breathe. Unfortunately, we have found that on average, three to four months after each treatment, the effectiveness of the cells begins to decrease. We believe the FDA’s permission to increase the number of treatments per year will help safeguard Ryan’s ability to preserve his improvements and more effectively control his Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy. Video: Ryan Benton discusses stem cell therapy for DMD
For many families that have lived alongside, or suffered from this disease, this is very exciting news. Ryan and his family are continually heart stricken as they hear of another member of their md community has died far too young due to the disease. It’s their hope they can help provide other families the same opportunities that they were so fortunate to receive.

Coming Together for a Cure, (CTFAC) is a non-profit organization founded by Benton’s siblings, Lauren and Blake after Ryan’s first round of treatments in 2009. In the 7 years since the Bentons were given new hope, they’ve been hard at work raising awareness and support for adult stem cell research and therapy.

To find more information about their organization, their family, or to find out how you can help, please visit http://www.comingtogetherforacure.org

For all other inquiries, please email comingtogetherforacure(at)gmail(dot)com

Stem cells “make her feel happy” – Stem Cell Therapy for Autism

Stem-Cell-Therapy-for-Autism-IconFor anyone with reservations about what the Stem cell Institute / stem cells can do, I have an 8 year old daughter that received her first Treatment 6 months ago. Prior to treatment she could speak but her speech was generally limited to asking for basic needs, and being trapped in cartoon dialogue for hours at a time. She would only eat a very limited few foods, she was generally unaware of others, didn’t express feelings or emotions, she was fearful to try doing new things, she had many sensory issues.

Within days of receiving her first treatment, she started asking us complex questions and we had real dialogue exchanges. She started venturing outside her comfort zone and trying new things like going on boat, kayak, tubing, etc. (none of which she would do prior). She started branching out and trying new foods, and at this point tries new things to determine how they taste and feel. She has become very social and has made friends at school, even though she has significant social delays and doesn’t always understand how play and interaction should happen, she tries and wants to play with others.

The most impressive change is that she is now much more connected to her surroundings and to events happening around her. She is also now capable of expressing feelings and emotions in an appropriate way. Prior to stem cells she could Say I love you, but it was in the same tone and voice inflection that was said to her. Now it’s her voice on her terms.

We just came back from a second treatment and are hopeful for more healing. We still have a ways to go, but are so happy with how much progress she has made.

Additionally I want to add that she looks forward to the treatments, she asks if she gets to get stem cells. In her words, she says, “they make her feel happy.” – Loreea Gallagher

Why Stem Cells Work: Clinical Trials for Spinal Cord Injury, Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy

Neil Riordan, PhD speaks at the Riordan-McKenna Institute and Stem Cell Institute fall seminar in Southlake, Texas on October 10, 2015.

Dr. Riordan discusses:

  • How our lab selects uses specialized screening techniques to select only the stem cells that we know will be the most useful for our patients. Only about 1 in 100 cords pass this screening process.
  • How umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) control inflammation, modulate the immune system and stimulate regeneration.
  • How the number and function of our own stem cells decline over time.
  • How MSC secretions promote healing
  • Where MSCs are found in our body
  • First clinic trial in the US using umbilical cord tissue-derived stem cells
  • How MSC doubling times dramatically decrease as people age, which is why cord cells are much more robust than a patient’s own cells as they age
  • The origin of Medistem Lab in Panama
  • Why the Stem Cell Institute and Medistem Labs are in Panama
  • Stem cell therapy laws and approvals around the world
  • Global interest in mesenchymal stem cell therapy research
  • Current clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells
  • Clinical trials in Panama
  • Collaborations with corporations and educational institutions
  • Mesenchymal stem cell selection, donor selection, and testing
  • Brief tour of Medistem Panama stem cell laboratory
  • Isolation and production of mesenchymal stem cells
  • Discovery of mesenchymal stem cells in menstrual blood
  • Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell studies for rheumatoid arthritis
  • The role of T-regulatory cells in rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis
  • Treating spinal cord injuries with mesenchymal stem cells
  • Mechanism of mesenchymal stem cells on spinal cord injury. They are not becoming tissue. It’s their secretions that allow the spinal cord to heal itself.
  • Umbilical cord MSC studies on spinal cord injury
  • Data from Stem Cell Institute spinal cord injury patients
  • Video from treated spinal cord injury patients
  • Postnatal MSC safety
  • MSCs and cancer risk – MSCs have been shows to actually inhibit tumor growth

Josh’s Journey to the Stem Cell Institute in Panama for Spinal Cord Injury Treatment

Follow Josh’s Blog http://joshsrecovery.blogspot.com

Monday, October 5, 2015

Josh Rivers Weights“Ok these stem cells might really be kicking in now! One of the leg machines I use I have only been able to do 30lbs max, over the last few months of going to the gym 3 times a week. Today all of a sudden I am able to do 70!!!!??? I am really in shock right now to see an increase like this out of nowhere.. just 2 days ago I was struggling with 30!! I was also able to add more weight to 2 out of the other 4 leg machines I use. I can’t believe it!!”

Note: The stem cell treatment protocol Josh underwent included multiple intravenous and intrathecal (into the spinal fluid) injections of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells and his own bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells administered over the course of one month. For more information about stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury, visit: https://www.cellmedicine.com/stem-cell-therapy-for-spinal-cord-injury/

Biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair with mesenchymal stem cells during arthroscopy improves healing and prevents further tears: a case-controlled study.

Int Orthop. 2014 Sep;38(9):1811-8. doi: 10.1007/s00264-014-2391-1. Epub 2014 Jun 7.

Hernigou P, Flouzat Lachaniette CH, Delambre J, Zilber S, Duffiet P, Chevallier N, Rouard H.

Abstract

Rotator Cuff

Rotator Cuff

PURPOSE:  The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair with iliac crest bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The prevalence of healing and prevention of re-tears were correlated with the number of MSCs received at the tendon-to-bone interface.

METHODS:  Forty-five patients in the study group received concentrated bone marrow-derived MSCs as an adjunct to single-row rotator cuff repair at the time of arthroscopy. The average number of MSCs returned to the patient was 51,000 ± 25,000. Outcomes of patients receiving MSCs during their repair were compared to those of a matched control group of 45 patients who did not receive MSCs. All patients underwent imaging studies of the shoulder with iterative ultrasound performed every month from the first postoperative month to the 24th month. The rotator cuff healing or re-tear was confirmed with MRI postoperatively at three and six months, one and two years and at the most recent follow up MRI (minimum ten-year follow-up).

RESULTS:  Bone marrow-derived MSC injection as an adjunctive therapy during rotator cuff repair enhanced the healing rate and improved the quality of the repaired surface as determined by ultrasound and MRI. Forty-five (100 %) of the 45 repairs with MSC augmentation had healed by six months, versus 30 (67 %) of the 45 repairs without MSC treatment by six months. Bone marrow concentrate (BMC) injection also prevented further ruptures during the next ten years. At the most recent follow-up of ten years, intact rotator cuffs were found in 39 (87 %) of the 45 patients in the MSC-treated group, but just 20 (44 %) of the 45 patients in the control group. The number of transplanted MSCs was determined to be the most relevant to the outcome in the study group, since patients with a loss of tendon integrity at any time up to the ten-year follow-up milestone received fewer MSCs as compared with those who had maintained a successful repair during the same interval.

CONCLUSION:  This study showed that significant improvement in healing outcomes could be achieved by the use of BMC containing MSC as an adjunct therapy in standard of care rotator cuff repair. Furthermore, our study showed a substantial improvement in the level of tendon integrity present at the ten-year milestone between the MSC-treated group and the control patients. These results support the use of bone marrow-derived MSC augmentation in rotator cuff repair, especially due to the enhanced rate of healing and the reduced number of re-tears observed over time in the MSC-treated patients.

Stem Cell Treatments for Autism – “Oh my god the speech!!! He’s TALKING I mean real speech and conversation!!! Today was crazy!!!”

This new facebook update on Anthony Guerriero says it all:

Autism Stem Cell Patient Anthony Guerriero

“Oh my god the speech!!! He’s TALKING I mean real speech and conversation!!! Today was crazy!!! Anthony was TELLING us all about his birthday, what he wants to do, counting down the days, what presents he wants, what he wants from Santa vs his birthday, all about Halloween and what each of us is going to be (Mommy is Blue toad, Bella is princess peach, daddy is luigi and Anthony now wants to be Mario), telling us what all the costumes are and what he’s wearing, what he did in school today, what he’s doing tomorrow for his last day, what he wants to play with and with who, what he wants for dinner (tried a new food too), how many days til we go to Maine, what we’re going to do there!!!!!! And on and on. Crazy crazy crazy!!! All spontaneous!!! All TALKING !!! It’s happening big time!!!!! WOW!!!”

Anthony Guerriero FB Comments 8-4-15

Anthony Guerriero FB Comments 8-4-15

Visit Anthony’s Facebook Page Here

Read original news story about Anthony here: Autistic Woodbridge boy making strides after stem cell treatment in Panama

Stem Cells Targeting Inflammation as Potential Anti-aging Strategies and Therapies

Rafael Gonzalez, Dave Woynarowski and Luis Geffner

The use of stem cells as anti-aging therapies may offer many an alternative method of slowing down or deterring several of the detrimental aspects of aging

Abstract

Human aging is associated with a vast array of clinical disorders that all relate to the body’s inability to maintain homeostasis. In our bodies, the healing process requires tight control of the acute inflammatory response. When the levels of inflammatory markers such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and C-reactive protein are elevated, there is a direct correlation with several chronic diseases of aging such as cardiovascular disease, cognitive decline, and physical disability. Extensive studies have shown strong evidence that elevated levels of these pro-inflammatory mediators may predict disease and disability in the aging population. As there is no cure for aging, a key question is how to modulate the effects of inflammation on aging and how to maintain healthy aging. Stem cells offer alternative approaches for treating various diseases/disorders. The use of stem cells as immune system modulators has shown tremendous promise. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have specific immunomodulatory properties that may help control inflammation. Several animal studies demonstrate that intravenous infusions of MSCs can decrease the pro-inflammatory response while increasing the anti-inflammatory response. Moreover, human clinical studies using MSCs in autoimmune and other inflammatory diseases have demonstrated modulation of the inflammatory response. Therefore, the use of stem cells as anti-aging therapies may offer many an alternative method of slowing down or deterring several of the detrimental aspects of aging.

View Full Article

Update on Glenburn Boy Who Underwent Stem Cell Therapy for Autism in Panama

 

JUN 8, 20155:54 PM EDT
By JOY HOLLOWELL

In 2009, an 8-year old Glenburn boy became the first child in Maine, and one of less than a hundred nationwide, to undergo stem cell therapy to treat his autism.

TV5 has followed the journey of Kenneth Kelley as he travelled to Panama for treatments.

It’s been about two years since his last transfusion.

Joy Hollowell checked in with the now 14-year old to see how he’s doing.
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Like most brothers, 16-year old Philip and 14-year old Kenneth Kelley enjoy challenging each other on video games.

“Who is better?

Kenneth points to Philip

Typical teenager is how most would describe Kenneth…something his parents couldn’t be happier to hear.

Kenneth was diagnosed with autism when he was two.

“Many reputable people told us that he should be put in an institution,” explains Donald Kelley, Kenneth’s father. “And that just made us more determined to find a cure for him. We knew there was one out there somewhere, there had to be.”

Like many parents of autistic kids, Donald and Marty Kelley went to numerous doctors and tried countless treatments, including installing a hyperbaric chamber inside their home.

They had read about stem cell therapy. but the clinic was in Panama, and it was still a relatively new therapy.

“Seeing doctors who tell you things that finally after a while you meeting everybody and you say to yourself, well yeah, OK, yeah, I’ve heard this before,” says Donald Kelley, expressing his frustration.

The Kelleys would spend the next two years researching stem cell therapy for autism, including visiting the clinic in Costa Rica.

“This was different,” says Donald Kelley, “this was totally different.”

Kenneth underwent his first cord blood infusion at the age of 8. That very next morning, The Kelleys say they saw a difference. Within a year, Kenneth was reading and communicating. He went back five more times, until the age of 12.

“The improvements that we saw with Kenneth were amazing,” says his father. “To see your child become you know, enjoying life.”

“Before stem cells, he was just off the charts most of the time,” says Kenneth’s brother, Philip. “Screaming, kicking. I don’t remember him ever actually having a conversation with me. He’s gone from more of a person that I had to take care of to a friend.”

8-year old Caroline calls her big brother a dolphin.

“because he’s very playful and he’s very nice and intelligent,” she explains.

“It was a true blessing that he got as far as he did,” says Donald Kelley. “And that he’s where he is today.”
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The Kelleys say for now, Kenneth is done with treatments. However, they would consider going back, depending upon their son’s progression.

They tell other parents of autistic kids to never give up.