Regenerative Medicine Center Opens at Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine and Health Sciences

The Neil Riordan Center for Regenerative Medicine Focuses on Non-Opioid Treatments of Pain

(Tempe, Arizona, October 2, 2018)–Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine & Health Sciences team will cut the ribbon for the opening of the new Neil Riordan Center for Regenerative Medicine on November 15 at 4:00 p.m. This affiliation between SCNM and Neil H. Riordan, PA, PhD, a research leader in stem cell therapy, will accelerate the development of this safe and innovative option for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. The Neil Riordan Center for Regenerative Medicine is staffed by an interdisciplinary team of physicians, and housed in SCNM’s LEED Platinum certified Community Commons.

Regenerative medicine, particularly autologous stem cell therapy, utilizes a patient’s own stem cells to promote healing, reduce inflammation and stimulate tissue repair. People with acute and chronic pain, including elite athletes, may benefit from the growth factors, natural anti-inflammatory activity, and regenerative properties of autologous stem cell therapy.

Over 100 million Americans suffer from chronic pain at an annual cost estimated at exceeding $620 billion, the many of whom are currently treated using opioids. This has led to wide-spread abuse and addiction to prescription opioids and illicit drugs including heroin. Opioid addiction and abuse has been attributed to 37,000 deaths each year nationally and 1,763 deaths of Arizonans from opioid overdoses in the past fifteen months. Stem cell therapy promises to limit the reliance on opioids thereby decreasing the potential for opioid addiction and abuse.

Neil Riordan, PA, PhD, is a pioneer in the field of applied stem cell research. In addition to collaboration with major universities in the United States, research and patient care is currently being conducted at Dr. Riordan’s other laboratories and clinics in Dallas, Texas and Panama City, Panama. He is an author on more than seventy peer-reviewed research publications, including clinical studies that explore stem cell therapy’s potential in treating conditions such as autism, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Dr. Riordan is the author of two books on stem cell therapy: Stem Cell Therapy: A Rising Tide – How Stem Cells are Disrupting Medicine and Changing Lives and MSC (Mesenchymal Stem Cells): Clinical Evidence Leading Medicine’s Next Frontier.

We welcome any questions or comments. Please contact Kirsten Texler at k.texler@scnm.edu for more information.

Image of Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine Logo and Tag Line

A leader in inspiring, teaching and providing multiple modalities in the scope of naturopathic medicine, Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine not only educates but also elevates society’s awareness of the power of holistic medicine. Campus highlights include a fully accredited four-year naturopathic doctoral program, a robust medical clinic open to the public, a dedicated pain relief and regenerative medicine center, innovative and inspirational public events, an on-site medicinary and multiple opportunities for ground-breaking research. Additionally, the SCNM Sage Foundation highlights the focus on philanthropy instilled in students and faculty as they provide care for underserved communities in seven satellite locations. Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine is dedicated to the idea that every person deserves high-quality fully integrated healthcare and creates an impact on the world through providing a private non-profit education in the culturally rich state of Arizona.

Acclaimed Guitarist Sonny Mayo on Stem Cell Therapy in Panama

From:  The EXPLODING HUMAN with Bob Nickman

Image of Sonny Mayo

SONNY MAYO, former guitarist for bands like Ugly Kid Joe and Snot, talks to me about getting STEM CELL THERAPY in Panama for a genetic heart condition. After two heart attacks and unpleasant side-effects from heart medications, Sonny was introduced to stem cell therapy through listening to a Joe Rogan podcast.  Raising money through GoFundMe, he was able too make the trip and receive treatment which is not yet legal in the United States.  Sonny is a stellar example of taking back his health treatment from an often limited and close-minded medical  system.  This is an important message as heart disease is the #1 killer in our country!

Original Link: http://theexplodinghuman.libsyn.com/episode-23-sonny-mayo-stem-cell-healing

For more information about stem cell therapy for heart disease, please visit: https://www.cellmedicine.com/stem-cell-therapy-for-heart-failure/

Stem Cell Treatments for Autism – James M’s Story

Donna: Hi, I’m Donna McCairn and this is my son…

James: James

Donna: And how old are you James?

James: 14 years old, 15…

Donna: Yeah, 15 in February. So, we came to Stem Cells last September and since then, the changes we’ve seen in James is that his math has really improved. For the first time he got two B’s at the end of last year for school. And then this year he had a target to get 70% mark by June of this year, but he actually got it when, James?

James: This month – for math.

Donna: For your test? And what have you noticed with the stem cells? What things have you found easier?

James: My daily life.

Donna: Such as?

James: Getting ready for school.

Donna: And what about your homework?

James: I’m completing my homework on time.

Donna: And so what we found at home is James is being more self-directed so instead of coming home and struggling to get through all the homework, he’s come home and sort of had that forward awareness where, “I’ve gotta get my homework done because it’s due tomorrow,” and sitting down and starting his homework unassisted, which has been a huge change. And what about with other people? What changes have you felt?

James: I’m talking to more people.

Donna: And are you less shy or more shy?

James: Less shy.

Donna: Ugh Huh. And what happened on this trip to Panama?

James: I made some friends.

Donna: It’s a first. As all the parents know, making friends is the hardest thing, isn’t it?

James: Yeah

Donna: Yeah. Reading people is really tricky. So with our home life, with his siblings, there’s been less arguing, more being friendly, more being able to reason, just not getting so uptight and blocked. He can understand others rather than being self-orientated and only interested in what he needs and getting frustrated. He’s starting to see his sisters’ point of view, But… They’re still not right are they?

James: Um, Hmm. (laughing)

Donna: And it’s those little things. So. James likes to be driven to school, but when I say, “No, you gotta go catch the bus,” he normally would have resisted and waited and waited, but what I’ve notice between the last stem cell visit and this visit is the ability for him to reason, “Okay, mom’s not going to drive me to school today. I just have to get ready and go.” Whereas before, he’d just wait, and just wait until someone just gave in, or at least walked him to the bus stop to get the bus. And what about coming home from school on your own on the bus?

James: I’m more happy.

Donna: And what about walking with the other boys?

James: I talk to them more.

Donna: And do you sometimes walk and get off the bus with the other boys and come the other way?

James: Yeah

Donna: So, it’s like he can get off at a stop where boys from his school get off together, and that’s a very new thing to go, “Oh, I need to be…” We all said, “You need to be in a group. You need pals.” What are you nudging me for? What’s the best thing about coming to Stem Cells?

James: The people and it doesn’t hurt. Oh, bringing your parents.

Donna: No, No, not parents. Being on holidays…

James: With mom.

Donna: Exactly! Being on holidays with mom. So if you want a great holiday, leave the kids. Leave the husband. Just come with your boy.

Stem Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis – Jennifer’s Story on Treatment in Panama

Hi. My name is Jennifer and I’ve been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) since 2003. I started coming to the Stem Cell Institute last year, 2017, in January. My second treatment was in August of last year and now I am here for my third treatment [May 2018].

“I feel strongly that I wouldn’t be where I am here today. I would have been in a wheelchair.”

From my first treatment, I saw major improvements as far as being able to stand without wobbling or bouncing back and forth. I also can feel my toes. I also have more bladder control. The second treatment, I didn’t really see much improvement like I did the first. The first was major. But now I am here for my third and I’m trying to go within six to seven, eight months the most in between my treatments until I see, let’s say 70% improvement.

So, thank you and I support the Stem Cell Institute, and I feel strongly that I wouldn’t be where I am here today. I would have been in a wheelchair.

Stem Cell Therapy in Panama Motivates Tony Robbins, NY Times #1 Best-selling Author!

Image of Motivational Speaker Tony Robbins at Stem Cell Institute in Panama

“Feeling absolutely invigorated after our trip to Panama this weekend, where I received the transformative benefits of stem cell therapy! Our huge thanks and honor to all the doctors and the bright, caring medical staff at the state-of-the-art Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama 🇵🇦. Stem cells saved my shoulder after struggling with excruciating pain from spinal stenosis and, more recently, a torn rotator cuff. Stem cell treatment is truly a next-level health innovation that can reverse the wear and tear we put on our bodies and prevent debilitating disease and injury from escalating further 🔬. This technological advancement will impact humanity in life-changing ways— it has the potential to transform and save MILLIONS of lives!…”  View Original Instagram Post
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Read Dr. Riordan’s Amazon #1 best-selling book about stem cell therapy today

“Neil takes readers on a riveting journey through the past, present and future of stem cell therapy. His well-researched, educational and entertaining book could change your life. I highly recommend it.”Tony Robbins, NY Times #1 Bestselling Author 

Image of Stem Cell Therapy - A Rising Tide Book Cover

Stem cells are the repair cells of your body. When there aren’t enough of them, or they aren’t working properly, chronic diseases can manifest and persist.

Neil H Riordan, PA, PhD, author of MSC: Clinical Evidence Leading Medicine’s Next Frontier, the definitive textbook on clinical stem cell therapy, brings you an easy-to-read book about how and why stem cells work, and why they’re the wave of the future.

From industry leaders, sport stars, and Hollywood icons to thousands of everyday, ordinary people, stem cell therapy has helped when standard medicine failed. Many of them had lost hope. These are their stories.

Purchase

UFC Champion TJ Dillashaw discusses how stem cell therapy in Panama cleared up his psoriasis

UFC bantamweight World Champion TJ Dillashaw discusses a side effect of his stem cell treatment at Stem Cell Institute in Panama with its founder, Neil Riordan, PA, PhD during dinner in Panama.

Dr. Riordan – I am talking about the last time you were down here.

TJ – I’ve been learning a lot about what the stem cell therapy did for me. Stuff that I didn’t even know it was going to do until I listened to you on the [Joe Rogan] podcast [with Mel Gibson]. And one was it got rid of my psoriasis.

Dr. Riordan – And where was your psoriasis?

TJ – My scalp. I had it for like six years. I thought changing my diet and all this stuff would help it out but I think what really helped it was coming down and getting stem cells.

Dr. Riordan – And how long was it after you got treated that you felt the difference?

TJ – Shoot. I didn’t notice for probably a couple months, I think is when I figured it out. I had it really bad but a couple months later it was completely gone.

Dr. Riordan – Wow.

TJ – I had it for six years, you know? Yeah.

Treatment with Umbilical Cord Stem Cells Safe with Sustained Benefits for MS, Trial Shows

Image of GMP syringe prep lab at Stem Cell Institute clinic in Panama.

Stem cells being prepared for treatment.

March 20, 2018
Jose Marques Lopes, PhD
Link to Original Story at Multiple Sclerosis News Today

Treatment with umbilical cord [tissue-derived mesenchymal] stem cells was found to be safe and leads to sustained improvements in disability and brain lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, according to a clinical trial.

The study, “Clinical feasibility of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of multiple sclerosis,” was published in the Journal of Translational Medicine.

Although current treatments for MS are able to reduce the frequency of flare-ups and slow disease progression, they are not able to repair the damage to nerve cells or the myelin sheath, the protective layer around nerve fibers.

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells found in multiple tissues, such as umbilical cord, bone marrow, and fat. These cells are able to mature into bone, cartilage, muscle, and adipose tissue cells.

MSCs may inhibit immune-mediated alterations. In particular, MSCs derived from the umbilical cord have a high ability to grow and multiply, increase the production of growth factors, and possess superior therapeutic activity, compared with other MSCs.

Diverse clinical studies have shown that MSCs can safely treat certain immune and inflammatory conditions, including MS.

The research team had previously demonstrated that MSCs can also improve cognitive and motor function.

Recent results with placenta or umbilical cord MSCs showed few mild or moderate adverse events, as well improvements in patients’ level of disability.

Researchers at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama have now completed a one-year Phase 1/2 clinical study (NCT02034188) to test the effectiveness and safety of umbilical cord MSCs for the treatment of MS.

The trial included 20 MS patients with a mean age of 41 years, 60 percent of whom were women. Fifteen participants had relapsing-remitting MS, four had primary progressive MS, and one had secondary progressive MS. Patients’ disease duration was a mean of 7.7 years.

Participants received seven intravenous infusions of 20×106 umbilical cord MSCs over seven days. The treatment’s effectiveness was evaluated at the start, at one month, and at one year after treatment.

Assessments included evaluating brain lesions with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and disability based on the Kurtzke Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), as well as validated MS tests for neurological function, hand function, mobility, and quality of life.

Patients did not report any serious adverse events. Most mild adverse events possibly related to treatment were headaches, which are common after MSC infusions, and fatigue, which is common in MS patients, the authors observed.

Improvements were most evident at one month after treatment, namely in the level of disability, nondominant hand function, and average walk time, as well as bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction. Patients also reported improved quality of life.

MRI scans at one year after treatment revealed inactive lesions in 15 of 18 evaluated patients. One patient showed almost complete elimination of lesions in the brain, which “is a particularly encouraging finding,” the researchers wrote.

At the one year point, improvements in disability levels were also still present, and could translate into improved ability to walk and work without assistance.

“The potential durable benefit of UCMSC [umbilical cord MSC] at 1 month, and sustained in some measures to 1 year, is in stark contrast to current MS drug therapies, which are required to be taken daily or weekly,” the researchers wrote.

The safety of the treatment is another advantage over available MS therapies, the team said.

They concluded that “treatment with UCMSC intravenous infusions for subjects with MS is safe, and potential therapeutic benefits should be further investigated.”

Joe Rogan Interview with Mel Gibson and Dr. Riordan

Joe Rogan interviews Stem Cell Institute founder Neil Riordan, PA, PhD and award-winning actor, director and producer Mel Gibson, who first brought his father to Panama at the age of 92.  Mel discusses his father’s miraculous recovery.  He is now 99.  Dr. Riordan discusses stem cell therapy using human *umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells including their application in conditions like multiple sclerosis and autism.

*umbilical cords are donated following normal, healthy births

Podcast: Listen to Dr. Mike Hutchinson, DVM interview with Dr. Riordan about stem cell therapy

About This Episode

Delve deeper into the stem cell world with pioneer and expert Dr. Neil Riordan. Co-founder/chief science officer of the Riordan-McKenna Institute, founder/chairman/chief science officer of the Stem Cell Institute and author of Stem Cell Therapy: A Rising Tide, he’s here to discuss ongoing stem cell studies with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, spinal cord injuries, MS, autism and more. He’ll also answer one of the most common stem cell questions: how can one cell treat so many different conditions?

View on drmikehutchinson.com

Stem Cell Therapy for Autism – Brady B’s Story

Interview with the parents of Brady B, during his second round of stem cell therapy for autism at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama using *umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

For more information, visit: https://www.cellmedicine.com/stem-cell-therapy-for-autism/

*umbilical cords donated after normal, healthy births

Interview Transcript

Interviewer: Today is December 22nd 2017. Please give your names.

Michele: Steve and Michelle Bacon and this is Brady.

Interviewer: Brady’s diagnosis?

Michele: Brady was diagnosed when he was two and a half with autism.

Interviewer: So, this would be his second stem cell treatment?

Michelle: Umm, hmm.

Interviewer: The first treatment was performed when?

Michelle: April, 2017.

Interviewer: Can you describe his improvements?

Michelle: The first round of stem cells, after the second infusion, we were putting him to bed that night and he said spontaneously, without any requests or anything, us prompting, nothing…his first 3-word sentence. He said, “I want pizza.”

Steve: When Brady was diagnosed he was, or is diagnosed as non-verbal. So that was a complete surprise that he came up with a spontaneous 3-word phrase.

Michelle: And before that, he had only been doing like “echoing” and a lot of it was not understandable to everyone. I mean, we understood because we know him but other people wouldn’t have been able to understand.

Steve: Since stem cells, he’s become more patient and able to wait for things and not have to quick go and do something. He can stand in a line and wait now.

Michelle: He’s more… His school reported that he is more tolerant of transitions, like when they’re transitioning from a preferred activity to, like, work, like a work sheet – school stuff.

Steve: He’s able to read some sight words now since…

Michelle: About 30. Yeah, he can read words now. He wasn’t able to do that before. He can… It started out just recognizing like, from an array of three pictures, and then he would have like, “apple” or “banana” and he’d have a horse and a pencil and a banana and he cold match the word “banana” to the picture. And he would trade out the words and he could correctly identify which word went with which picture. And now, all we need is the flashcard of the word, no pictures, just like “horse” or “yellow”. And he can identify about 30 words. 30 or 40 words.

Steve: And he can now read some simple sentences with the sight words in it that he knows. And this is all new since stem cell treatments.

Michelle: Yeah, a lot more tolerant. Eye contact is better. He seeks out peers to play now whereas he didn’t before. Greetings are better – like “Hi” and “Bye”. Still working on the eye contact though. That one’s still kind of tough. He can look at you in a mirror, do eye contact in a mirror but the face is a little hard still.

Interviewer: Ok, anything else that you’d like to mention?

Michelle: Anything else guys?

Brother: He’s my brother.

Sister: [Inaudible]

Steve: More interactive with peers and family members.

Michelle: He’s definitely more interactive with everyone.

Interviewer: Ok.

Michelle: And no.. Oh yeah! He used to, it was hard always to get him to come out of his room. He would just want to sit in his room and play on his iPad and now he actually comes out and he sits with us a lot more. And he’s a lot more interactive with the family. We used to have a hard time getting him to stay at the table for dinner and now, he stays at the table no problems. He used to have meltdowns that would last 20 or 30 minutes. Now, he turns around in like, a minute. It’s so much better. His temperament is a lot better. I mean, he’s always been a very good boy but he gets rigid about things, you know? If he doesn’t have it just that way, it’s a 20 – 30 minute meltdown – before. Now, it’s much better.

Interviewer: Ok. That’s it. Thank you very much.

Everyone (including Brady): Cheese!