Stem Cell Treatments for Autism – James M’s Story

Donna: Hi, I’m Donna McCairn and this is my son…

James: James

Donna: And how old are you James?

James: 14 years old, 15…

Donna: Yeah, 15 in February. So, we came to Stem Cells last September and since then, the changes we’ve seen in James is that his math has really improved. For the first time he got two B’s at the end of last year for school. And then this year he had a target to get 70% mark by June of this year, but he actually got it when, James?

James: This month – for math.

Donna: For your test? And what have you noticed with the stem cells? What things have you found easier?

James: My daily life.

Donna: Such as?

James: Getting ready for school.

Donna: And what about your homework?

James: I’m completing my homework on time.

Donna: And so what we found at home is James is being more self-directed so instead of coming home and struggling to get through all the homework, he’s come home and sort of had that forward awareness where, “I’ve gotta get my homework done because it’s due tomorrow,” and sitting down and starting his homework unassisted, which has been a huge change. And what about with other people? What changes have you felt?

James: I’m talking to more people.

Donna: And are you less shy or more shy?

James: Less shy.

Donna: Ugh Huh. And what happened on this trip to Panama?

James: I made some friends.

Donna: It’s a first. As all the parents know, making friends is the hardest thing, isn’t it?

James: Yeah

Donna: Yeah. Reading people is really tricky. So with our home life, with his siblings, there’s been less arguing, more being friendly, more being able to reason, just not getting so uptight and blocked. He can understand others rather than being self-orientated and only interested in what he needs and getting frustrated. He’s starting to see his sisters’ point of view, But… They’re still not right are they?

James: Um, Hmm. (laughing)

Donna: And it’s those little things. So. James likes to be driven to school, but when I say, “No, you gotta go catch the bus,” he normally would have resisted and waited and waited, but what I’ve notice between the last stem cell visit and this visit is the ability for him to reason, “Okay, mom’s not going to drive me to school today. I just have to get ready and go.” Whereas before, he’d just wait, and just wait until someone just gave in, or at least walked him to the bus stop to get the bus. And what about coming home from school on your own on the bus?

James: I’m more happy.

Donna: And what about walking with the other boys?

James: I talk to them more.

Donna: And do you sometimes walk and get off the bus with the other boys and come the other way?

James: Yeah

Donna: So, it’s like he can get off at a stop where boys from his school get off together, and that’s a very new thing to go, “Oh, I need to be…” We all said, “You need to be in a group. You need pals.” What are you nudging me for? What’s the best thing about coming to Stem Cells?

James: The people and it doesn’t hurt. Oh, bringing your parents.

Donna: No, No, not parents. Being on holidays…

James: With mom.

Donna: Exactly! Being on holidays with mom. So if you want a great holiday, leave the kids. Leave the husband. Just come with your boy.

Stem Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis – Jennifer’s Story on Treatment in Panama

Hi. My name is Jennifer and I’ve been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) since 2003. I started coming to the Stem Cell Institute last year, 2017, in January. My second treatment was in August of last year and now I am here for my third treatment [May 2018].

“I feel strongly that I wouldn’t be where I am here today. I would have been in a wheelchair.”

From my first treatment, I saw major improvements as far as being able to stand without wobbling or bouncing back and forth. I also can feel my toes. I also have more bladder control. The second treatment, I didn’t really see much improvement like I did the first. The first was major. But now I am here for my third and I’m trying to go within six to seven, eight months the most in between my treatments until I see, let’s say 70% improvement.

So, thank you and I support the Stem Cell Institute, and I feel strongly that I wouldn’t be where I am here today. I would have been in a wheelchair.

Stem Cell Therapy in Panama Motivates Tony Robbins, NY Times #1 Best-selling Author!

Image of Motivational Speaker Tony Robbins at Stem Cell Institute in Panama

“Feeling absolutely invigorated after our trip to Panama this weekend, where I received the transformative benefits of stem cell therapy! Our huge thanks and honor to all the doctors and the bright, caring medical staff at the state-of-the-art Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama 🇵🇦. Stem cells saved my shoulder after struggling with excruciating pain from spinal stenosis and, more recently, a torn rotator cuff. Stem cell treatment is truly a next-level health innovation that can reverse the wear and tear we put on our bodies and prevent debilitating disease and injury from escalating further 🔬. This technological advancement will impact humanity in life-changing ways— it has the potential to transform and save MILLIONS of lives!…”  View Original Instagram Post
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Read Dr. Riordan’s Amazon #1 best-selling book about stem cell therapy today

“Neil takes readers on a riveting journey through the past, present and future of stem cell therapy. His well-researched, educational and entertaining book could change your life. I highly recommend it.”Tony Robbins, NY Times #1 Bestselling Author 

Image of Stem Cell Therapy - A Rising Tide Book Cover

Stem cells are the repair cells of your body. When there aren’t enough of them, or they aren’t working properly, chronic diseases can manifest and persist.

Neil H Riordan, PA, PhD, author of MSC: Clinical Evidence Leading Medicine’s Next Frontier, the definitive textbook on clinical stem cell therapy, brings you an easy-to-read book about how and why stem cells work, and why they’re the wave of the future.

From industry leaders, sport stars, and Hollywood icons to thousands of everyday, ordinary people, stem cell therapy has helped when standard medicine failed. Many of them had lost hope. These are their stories.

Purchase

UFC Champion TJ Dillashaw discusses how stem cell therapy in Panama cleared up his psoriasis

UFC bantamweight World Champion TJ Dillashaw discusses a side effect of his stem cell treatment at Stem Cell Institute in Panama with its founder, Neil Riordan, PA, PhD during dinner in Panama.

Dr. Riordan – I am talking about the last time you were down here.

TJ – I’ve been learning a lot about what the stem cell therapy did for me. Stuff that I didn’t even know it was going to do until I listened to you on the [Joe Rogan] podcast [with Mel Gibson]. And one was it got rid of my psoriasis.

Dr. Riordan – And where was your psoriasis?

TJ – My scalp. I had it for like six years. I thought changing my diet and all this stuff would help it out but I think what really helped it was coming down and getting stem cells.

Dr. Riordan – And how long was it after you got treated that you felt the difference?

TJ – Shoot. I didn’t notice for probably a couple months, I think is when I figured it out. I had it really bad but a couple months later it was completely gone.

Dr. Riordan – Wow.

TJ – I had it for six years, you know? Yeah.

Podcast: Listen to Dr. Mike Hutchinson, DVM interview with Dr. Riordan about stem cell therapy

About This Episode

Delve deeper into the stem cell world with pioneer and expert Dr. Neil Riordan. Co-founder/chief science officer of the Riordan-McKenna Institute, founder/chairman/chief science officer of the Stem Cell Institute and author of Stem Cell Therapy: A Rising Tide, he’s here to discuss ongoing stem cell studies with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, spinal cord injuries, MS, autism and more. He’ll also answer one of the most common stem cell questions: how can one cell treat so many different conditions?

View on drmikehutchinson.com

Stem Cell Therapy for Autism – Brady B’s Story

Interview with the parents of Brady B, during his second round of stem cell therapy for autism at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama using *umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

For more information, visit: https://www.cellmedicine.com/stem-cell-therapy-for-autism/

*umbilical cords donated after normal, healthy births

Interview Transcript

Interviewer: Today is December 22nd 2017. Please give your names.

Michele: Steve and Michelle Bacon and this is Brady.

Interviewer: Brady’s diagnosis?

Michele: Brady was diagnosed when he was two and a half with autism.

Interviewer: So, this would be his second stem cell treatment?

Michelle: Umm, hmm.

Interviewer: The first treatment was performed when?

Michelle: April, 2017.

Interviewer: Can you describe his improvements?

Michelle: The first round of stem cells, after the second infusion, we were putting him to bed that night and he said spontaneously, without any requests or anything, us prompting, nothing…his first 3-word sentence. He said, “I want pizza.”

Steve: When Brady was diagnosed he was, or is diagnosed as non-verbal. So that was a complete surprise that he came up with a spontaneous 3-word phrase.

Michelle: And before that, he had only been doing like “echoing” and a lot of it was not understandable to everyone. I mean, we understood because we know him but other people wouldn’t have been able to understand.

Steve: Since stem cells, he’s become more patient and able to wait for things and not have to quick go and do something. He can stand in a line and wait now.

Michelle: He’s more… His school reported that he is more tolerant of transitions, like when they’re transitioning from a preferred activity to, like, work, like a work sheet – school stuff.

Steve: He’s able to read some sight words now since…

Michelle: About 30. Yeah, he can read words now. He wasn’t able to do that before. He can… It started out just recognizing like, from an array of three pictures, and then he would have like, “apple” or “banana” and he’d have a horse and a pencil and a banana and he cold match the word “banana” to the picture. And he would trade out the words and he could correctly identify which word went with which picture. And now, all we need is the flashcard of the word, no pictures, just like “horse” or “yellow”. And he can identify about 30 words. 30 or 40 words.

Steve: And he can now read some simple sentences with the sight words in it that he knows. And this is all new since stem cell treatments.

Michelle: Yeah, a lot more tolerant. Eye contact is better. He seeks out peers to play now whereas he didn’t before. Greetings are better – like “Hi” and “Bye”. Still working on the eye contact though. That one’s still kind of tough. He can look at you in a mirror, do eye contact in a mirror but the face is a little hard still.

Interviewer: Ok, anything else that you’d like to mention?

Michelle: Anything else guys?

Brother: He’s my brother.

Sister: [Inaudible]

Steve: More interactive with peers and family members.

Michelle: He’s definitely more interactive with everyone.

Interviewer: Ok.

Michelle: And no.. Oh yeah! He used to, it was hard always to get him to come out of his room. He would just want to sit in his room and play on his iPad and now he actually comes out and he sits with us a lot more. And he’s a lot more interactive with the family. We used to have a hard time getting him to stay at the table for dinner and now, he stays at the table no problems. He used to have meltdowns that would last 20 or 30 minutes. Now, he turns around in like, a minute. It’s so much better. His temperament is a lot better. I mean, he’s always been a very good boy but he gets rigid about things, you know? If he doesn’t have it just that way, it’s a 20 – 30 minute meltdown – before. Now, it’s much better.

Interviewer: Ok. That’s it. Thank you very much.

Everyone (including Brady): Cheese!

Stem Cell Therapy for Autism – Clara Goodman: ‘Never Give Up on Your Child’

Image of stem cell therapy patient Ari Goodman

 

By Jill Kirsch | December 28, 2017
Original Publication on Jewish Link of New Jersey

Following Ari Goodman’s first stem cell therapy last year, to treat what doctors called severe low-functioning autism, The Jewish Link reported on his progress and his family’s hope that they would be able to help him continue his journey towards recovery.

Ari was first diagnosed seven years ago, after he began losing skills at the age of 18 months. His mother, Clara, and father, Daniel, a 1990 graduate of Frisch who grew up in Parsippany, explored all therapies available to Ari, but nothing was able to reach him.

The family persevered, finally learning of the Stem Cell Institute, a facility in Panama that was known for successfully administering stem cell therapy to patients with autism. Clara and Daniel were determined to help Ari receive that treatment but, with the procedure and other costs totalling nearly $20,000, they feared it was beyond their reach.

Clara, ever her son’s champion, reached out to The Jewish Link, seeking assistance in sharing her family’s story, and the response went well beyond what they imagined. The Goodmans, residents of East Windsor, were able to take Ari for his first treatment in May of 2016, and the results, noted Clara, were “miraculous.” Within weeks the family saw Ari begin “coming back to us. We started to see changes,” she said.

Feeling eternally grateful to the greater Jewish community for its help, and hopeful for the first time in years, Clara again reached out, in December of 2016, through a follow-up article in The Jewish Link. This time the Goodmans were not surprised by the outpouring of support, but just as grateful. “It is amazing how many people are right there with us. Everyone who has cared about our story has helped in some way,” Clara remarked.

Ari, now 9 years old, received his second stem cell therapy earlier this year, and Clara was thrilled to discuss his progress with The Jewish Link. “Since February, his awareness of everything is 100 percent there,” she said. “He responds. His receptive language is amazing. He’s able to answer questions. He just knows everything and has opinions.”

Clara reports that Ari is now able to spontaneously ask for things and express wants and needs, though still only using one word at a time. “He has a sense of humor now. He laughs,” she said.

He is able to read sentences, and can spell words and put them together to form sentences. In fact, at school Ari is no longer in the class for children with autism; his progress has allowed him to move to a class for students with “multiple disabilities,” where the students are more social and conversational. His teachers have told Clara that Ari adds much to the classroom, and both students and teachers enjoy having him there.

“My hope is that he’ll develop more language,” said Clara. “I hope to mainstream him and maybe have him attend a Jewish school one day. We would love for him to learn Torah every day.”

For the first time, Clara is anxiously awaiting Ari’s annual IEP (Individualized Educational Plan) meeting next month, as she has already been told by his teachers that he has met all of his goals and they want to expand on that for next year. “I used to dread those meetings,” she stated. “Now I can’t wait. I’m looking forward to every day and seeing what new things he can do.”

Ari is “loving and affectionate, full of hugs and kisses,” Clara reported. “Doctors said he’d never do that.”

She continued, “We were told he would never be able to do any of these things. He is showing more every day that he’s whole. It’s in there and once the stem cells heal him it will all come back. He is proving everybody wrong and showing that Hashem is in charge, not any doctor.”

The Goodmans are hoping that a third treatment will “show more revealed miracles,” added Clara. He’s not conversational yet; I want the social aspect to come. I know he’s not out of the woods yet. He has a long way to go,” but “every time we go we see more and more improvement.”

While trials using adult stem cells are now ongoing at Duke University in North Carolina, America still does not have any treatments available that might benefit Ari. “We are that much closer to the FDA approving treatment,” Clara said. “But even then it still might not be covered.”

In the meantime, the Goodmans believe they must continue these treatments. “The stem cell therapy is allowing him to respond to all the therapies that weren’t working before. His body is healing and is open to it now,” added Clara.

“I feel like I have him back again and it’s the most wonderful feeling in the world,” she continued. “We felt like we lost him when he was diagnosed. Ari is proof that miracles do happen.”

“Ari has been through so much and he is still such a happy kid. He inspires others. I really believe that his mission in life is to heal the world; he’s helping us all be better people,” Clara stated. “His middle name is Netanel, which means ‘gift from God.’ He really is.”

Clara hopes that her family’s journey will provide strength to others who have children with autism. “There is an answer. Don’t ever give up on your child,” she said.

To help the Goodman family provide another stem cell treatment for Ari, please visit www.gofundme.com/aristemcelljourney or, to make a tax-deductible donation, send a check payable to “Congregation Toras Emes,” with “for Ari Goodman” noted in the memo line, and send ℅ Clara Goodman to 523 Nettleton Drive, East Windsor, NJ 08520.

By Jill Kirsch

Video: Stem Cell Therapy in Panama with Dr. Riordan and Mel Gibson

Host Michael Beattie discusses stem cell therapy using *human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCT-MSCs)  at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama with renowned applied stem cell scientist and founder, Neil Riordan, Pa, PhD and acclaimed actor, director and producer Mel Gibson.

Dr. Riordan discusses the miraculous progress of a spinal cord injury patient and pilot whose doctors said that he would never walk again.  He talks about where the stem cells come from, how they work and why they can treat so many seemingly different conditions.  Dr. Riordan explains how umbilical cords, and subsequently, hUCT-MSCs used at the Stem Cell Institute are carefully selected using molecular screening.  He also discusses why mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cords function better than MSCs from adults, especially as they age or if they are suffering from a disease like multiple sclerosis.  For example. MSCs from a newborn multiply exponentially compared to MSCs from an older adult.

Mel Gibson discusses his father’s miraculous recovery, literally from his deathbed after receiving hUCT-MSCs at the age of 92.  He’s currently 99 and still going strong having been treated in Panama several times since then.  Mel also discusses his personal experiences in Panama.

Watch all this and more.

*umbilical cord tissue harvested after normal, healthy births

Stem Cell Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis

Image of Stem Cell Therapy Patient Marth Phillips

A Miracle for Martha
A woman’s journey of deliverance from pain

By Deanna Kirk Daily Sun Nov 26, 2017 (Link to original story)

The last 12 months have been a giant series of ups and downs, an extreme roller coaster for Martha Phillips.

Last December, her father-in-law battled brain cancer, which affected the lives of all of her close family; and her only brother died very suddenly from a pulmonary embolism. They were buried a week apart.

The battle with Multiple Sclerosis

Martha had been fighting her own battle against Multiple Sclerosis since a diagnosis in 2010. This disease causes the body’s immune system to attack its own tissues, and the malfunction destroys myelin, the fatty substance that coats and protects nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Phillips’ had seen her own ups and downs in that battle as well, with medications that caused huge weight gain, severe intolerance to heat, and intense bouts with pain. She tried many different protocols and medications, but what seemed to make the most difference was an extreme dietary change, which led to a loss of 72 pounds, acupuncture, adjustments, and regular massage therapy. Under the care of Dr. William “Doc” Davis in Ennis, she went from 10 prescriptions down to two, and did quite well for nearly six years.

But after the bout with all the stress during December 2016, Phillips discovered her body just could not cope with all the continuous stress demands placed upon it, and she suffered a pretty severe setback. She was forced to go on disability from her job.

“The Tysybri I was having infused regularly has a black box warning,” Phillips said. “I had to sign paperwork when I started taking it, that I knew it could kill me.”

The neurologist offered several other choices of medications, but all were either equally as risky with not as many good results, or more risky with even worse results.

“To me, it felt like my only choice was going backwards, and to me that was unacceptable,” she said.

Phillips learned about a somewhat-new innovative treatment for people with Multiple Sclerosis, and it was not being done in the United States yet, but for $25,000 one could fly to Panama City, Panama and have the complete treatment done and stay right in the same hotel where the treatments are done.

The blessings of how all her funding came together to have the treatment were chronicled in a story that ran in the July 8, 2017 edition of the Daily Sun.

But this story is about the trip itself, the treatment, and how her life has been since the trip to Panama.

Life since Panama, and new stem cells

It’s been roughly three months since Phillips returned from Panama. She took her little sister Robine Reeves with her, and the things she noticed right off were 1) the Atlanta airport is awful, and 2) Panama is a lot like Texas with regard to the weather.

“It’s very Americanized — they take American dollars, Spanish is their primary language but it’s OK if you don’t speak it,” Phillips said. “The people in Panama are so super friendly, even the kids. A group of junior high kids got on the bus with us and many of them spoke to us. That was the day Vice President Pence was there, and we, stupid Americans, didn’t know he was there, but his motorcade was very impressive.”

Phillips notice that the Panamanian president’s motorcade also came through that morning, and they watched it all from the rooftop of their hotel where the pool was. And some guy from London had to tell them their own Vice President was there.

“The clinic has a very impressive concierge,” she said. “Someone was there holding a sign with my name on it at the airport. She took us to the VIP lounge and whisked us through customs and the fingerprint deal very quickly and painlessly, and called our driver who works for the clinic. He took us to the hotel, and showed us shopping and restaurants along the way.

“They don’t have really good restaurants, they just look for consistency,” she said.

“The next day, I had a medical checkup and blood work. The second day, they gave me stem cells through an IV. I also had two subcutaneous injections in the groin/lymph region, which were more painful than the IV.”

Phillips also had physical therapy that day which consisted of evaluation, stretching exercises, balance and strength.

“The stems cells they use are umbilical cord stem cells, which women donate when they give birth,” she said. “Since they are brand new, they double every 24 hours. They’re a perfect source because they multiply so fast. I got 1.33 million stem cells.”

The way the stem cells work for MS and some other autoimmune diseases they’re using them for is that they reset the immune system, she said. They do not go in and repair the damage the MS has already done to her brain, but there is scientific evidence that shows if MS stops attacking the body, the body can heal the brain and spinal lesions.

“They believe that because there’s another virus that does the same kind of damage to your brain, but because it does not continue to attack the brain, people recover from it,” Phillips said.

There was another day of treatment just like the previous day, then the following day the sisters flew home. On the day of the blood work and checkup, the doctor discussed diet and supplements with Martha.

“He started describing a high fat, low carb diet, and I said, ‘Do you mean a keto diet?’ and he said ‘Yes,’” she said. “He said I would be throwing my $25,000 down the drain if I did NOT follow this diet and take supplements.”

Phillips had already followed this diet in the past, but wasn’t following it very strictly at the time.

Her supplement list looked something like this: 2000 mg per day of Magnesium; B vitamins; CoQ10; Stemkline; Probiotics; and a lot of it is supposed to be for energy as well as for brain health.

“When I went to Panama, I was taking 10 prescriptions,” she said. “I am taking one now, 90 days later.

“That all actually happened within the first two weeks.

“I feel amazing. I feel like I can conquer the world. I’ve had more energy than I’ve had the entire time I’ve had MS.”

Philips said when she made her trip to Panama, her thought was if she could get rid of enough of the pain and fatigue in order to return to work, she would be happy.

“But I got SO much more — I actually have no symptoms right now.”

She’s also no longer a slave to heat intolerance. Before, when she went to CrossFit, she had to wear a cooling vest full of ice packs and stand in front of a giant fan or A/C unit in order to work out. The least little bit of heat would cause her to become very, very sick.

“The first time I worked out after my transplant, Nick (Biles) came over to check on me, and I cried and said ‘I can’t remember the last time I worked out without heat intolerance,’” she said.

The heat intolerance makes the MS Symptoms you have temporarily worse until your body cools down. That can happen with one degree of change in body temperature, she said.

“It’s really weird to me now, to learn how to live without thinking about all those things,” Phillips said. “For so long, I’ve had to consider all sorts of eventualities in every scenario I find myself in.”

Stem Cell Therapy for Autism – Dimitri W’s Story

For more information about stem cell therapy for autism please CLICK HERE.

Dimitri’s parents discuss his progress after his first round of stem cell treatments for autism in Panama.

Interviewer (I): Today is August 4th, 2017. Please give your name.

Dimitri (D): Dimitri

(I): Your last name?

(D): Weaver

(I): Your age?

(D): Six

(I): Mom, his diagnosis?

Mrs. Weaver (MOM): He was diagnosed with autism at the age of three.

(I): Ok, so this is his second stem cell treatment?

(MOM): Second stem cell treatment, yes, about a year apart.

(I): Can you describe his improvements?

(MOM): I’ve definitely seen a lot of growth since last year, mostly in language [and] comprehension. He started school last year. He’s reading. We’ve notice a lot of changes with being able to sit still and focus at school. We’re still struggling in that area but last year we weren’t sure if he was going to be able to go to kindergarten and he’s doing well. His first year, he’s now participating in sports. He just started karate, and doing really well with that. Mr. Weaver

Mr. Weaver (DAD): I think that, yeah, he’s had a lot of remarkable changes in the past year. He’s done really well with kindergarten as you’ve said.

(MOM): Overall, the teachers that saw him last year for evaluation for his IEP – and then we had an IEP meeting this May, not even a year apart. They said he looks like a different child. So they weren’t expecting the growth that he’s made this year in school.

(I): Anything else you would like to mention? (MOM): We haven’s seen any regressions or any negative, no side effects. All we’ve seen is growth. That’s why we’re here again this year. It’s been all positive for us.

(DAD): It’s been a great experience.