Stem Cell Therapy: Paralyzed Whitfield Co teen takes first steps, community pitching in

Posted: May 02, 2014 4:57 PM CDT Updated: May 02, 2014 6:05 PM CDT
By Kimberly Barbour, Reporter

Hannah LockeWHITFIELD COUNTY, GA (WRCB) – A North Georgia community is rallying around a teen girl recovering from a head-on car crash. She recently took her first steps since becoming paralyzed one year ago.

17-year-old Hannah Locke was riding in her family’s car last April when another car hit them head-on. She’s been confined to a wheelchair ever since, but now, a breakthrough.

Her community is trying to raise money for more treatment in hopes she’ll be able to walk on her own again someday.

Hannah is a junior at Coahulla Creek High School. Before the paralyzing accident she was a three sport athlete. Now her drive has shifted to getting out of the wheelchair she’s been in for the last year. She says it’s with her faith and community that she’s getting closer reaching that goal. Her friends are hoping to give her a boost this weekend.

It’s been a year full of challenges far beyond most teens, but Hannah Locke is only growing stronger.

She recently took her first steps since becoming paralyzed one year after a head-on crash. In just the last month, she’s re-gained some control over the lower half of her body.

“They laid me down and told me to try to kick my legs and they did it and we were all like, what just happened,” Hannah said.

Now she’s walking with a harness.

“Feeling emotion-wise, it’s exciting but feeling-wise, it’s weird to see my feet moving and not really be in complete control over them or feel them,” Hannah said.

“I don’t think we’ve ever been filled with so much joy before because I know how hard she works on a daily basis whether it’s therapy or here at home just getting out of bed, doing normal things me and you do that’s so much harder for her,” friend Jordan Greene said.

Hannah says people throughout Whitfield County have been there holding her hand through it all. They’ve held fundraisers to help pay some of her medical expenses, but this weekend they’re going bigger. They’ve organized a benefit concert featuring Christian musicians and some cast members from the show Duck Dynasty.

“People throughout the community were just like oh you need posters, we’ll print them, oh you need t-shirts we’ll do that, oh you need a gym, come use ours,” Greene said.

The money will pay for a return trip to Panama where Hannah hopes to get more stem cell injections that are helping re-connect the nerves in her legs.

Those who know her say they’ll do everything they can to get her back on her feet again. They say she’s a girl who inspires everyone she meets with her positive attitude and unwavering faith in God.

“He always finds a way to shine a light in the toughest storms,” Hannah said.

The concert is 5:30 p.m. Sunday at North Murray High School. Doors open at 4:45 p.m. They still half the seats available and will still be selling them at the door. General admission is $30 and floor preferred tickets are $60. For more info, call 800-965-9324 or email helpinghannahheal@gmail.com

Sam Harrell’s Stem Cell Journey: Stem Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

Sam Harrell sent us this homemade video documenting his progress from 2010 until now (2014). Sam was coaching football at Ennis high school in Texas when MS struck him hard, forcing him to retire. Since then, after several rounds of stem cell therapy at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama, Sam has returned to coaching football, something he though that he would never be able to do again.

For more information about umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell therapy for MS, please visit: http://www.cellmedicine.com/stem-cell-therapy-for-multiple-sclerosis-3/

5 year-old autistic boy making steady gains after umbilical cord stem cell treatments

The names in this interview have been changed at the parents’ request to maintain privacy.

The following is a transcription of an interview with A.R. and S.R. regarding their son “Billy”. “Billy” was diagnosed Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) just before his second birthday in February 2011. Since that time, “Billy” has received several courses of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells at the Stem Cell Institute.

“In general, his improvements have been so great that the school is advising a repeat assessment to see if he still fits under the diagnosis of ASD.”

What kind of ASD symptoms did “Billy” have before his stem cell treatments?

His symptoms included temper tantrums that resembled seizures lasting 30 to 45 minutes at a time. He was hyperactive and sometimes unintentionally violent in his play. He had very poor eye contact. He did not answer to his name. His dietary habits were very limited.

How has “Billy” improved since his last round of treatments?

Thus far, he has had three Rx cycles at the Center: July, 2012 (age 3y-4mo), March 2013 (age 4y) and Feb 2014 (age 4y, 11 mo). Each time he showed rather sudden improvements in almost all areas of prior difficulties. After his first treatment, 90% of the tantrums disappeared within two weeks. His eye contact suddenly improved. He became much more aware of his surroundings – almost as if he just woke from a half sleep state. He started playing with his father for first time and with his twin somewhat. Transitions were much easier. Speech improved. He started greeting his therapists by name each day. We did not tell the therapists of the stem cell Rx as we wanted to get an unbiased feedback on his progress. They were rather surprised at the sudden change in his cognition and behavior. He still had some issues like not initiating play with his twin or other kids. His eye contact was much improved but not quite the same level as expected of his age group. Reciprocal conversation was also limited. After his second Rx he started to initiate play with his sib and other kids. Tantrums completely disappeared. Transition issues and general parental compliance improved. He started attending JK class in Sept 2014. He was assessed by a clinical psychologist for his post IBI evaluation in Oct 2014. Overall, he had showed considerable improvements, especially in non-verbal learning abilities as these were now on par as expected for normal kids his age (45’th percentile). However, his verbal learning abilities remained compromised (8’th percentile). His main limiting factors were his attention span and his diet remained somewhat limited. After his third Rx in Feb 2014, we have thus far noticed remarkable improvement in his diet. He is now eating sometimes even better than his normal twin. His language seems to be further along with more complex sentences. Hyperactivity and focus has also improved and we are only one month post Rx at the time of writing of this feedback. In general, his improvements have been so great that the school is advising a repeat assessment to see if he still fits under the diagnosis of ASD. We are awaiting an appointment for this some time later this year.

What kind of treatments and/or therapies did you try before coming to Panama for stem cell therapy?

Following the diagnosis, we attended parental workshops to help these types of kids with speech and other developmental issues. We began taking him daily to Ontario Early Years centers where “Billy” could be exposed to other normal kids his age group so can join in on children’s activities. His speech improved a bit with this exposure. However, he would not play with the other children. Nine months after his diagnosis, he was accepted into the Themes Valley Autism Treatment program. They started sending in IBI therapists to work with “Billy” for about 6 hours per weekday. He made a little bit further progress in language but eye contact remained extremely poor. Temper tantrums were still a major issue. Transitions remained very difficult. Diet remained very limited. He did not play with his normal (non-identical) twin or other kids.

How did you find the clinic and what made you decide upon the Stem Cell Institute?

We found the Panama clinic by researching for additional modalities of treatment. We reviewed some of the candid discussions and videos of families of former patients of the clinic. We queried the medical officers at the clinic to ensure cell samples were screened thoroughly for blood borne pathogens. We finally decided to go ahead with the treatment as “Billy” clearly would not have had a very happy life if we continued with only behavioral therapy. We also were afraid he may unintentionally harm his normal twin due to his sudden violent movements and outbursts.

Stem Cell Institute Company Logo

Multiple sclerosis patient retires his walking stick after umbilical cord-derived stem cell therapy

From: mcgillron
Date: Wed, Nov 27, 2013 at 11:51 AM
Subject: Happy Thanksgiving!
To: edited_for_privacy@cellmedicine.com

Dr Barnett / Dr Hernandez & all staff at Clinic,

It’s a very special Thanksgiving for my household & I owe it to the efforts of all of you!

I’ve been walking without my stick since returning from stem cell therapy. 1 week of holding it for security & going on 3rd week of it riding in truck of my car. My stability is becoming more consistent & controlled. I am walking farther longer, riding bicycle more rhythmic & swimming smoother strokes.

Results are much greater than I expected. I believe the lifestyle changes, vitamin regimen, herbals, exercise & positive attitude adopted 14 months prior to visiting you allowed me to receive maximum benefit from the stem cell therapy.

I look forward to progressing my abilities back to a higher level over the next months.

If you would like me to share what I’ve done & am doing to get my results, feel free to give my email.

Dr Hernandez – please stay in contact on the herbal adjustments I’m making to solve final 2 deficiencies.

THANKS AGAIN for your hospitality & care!

Ron Mc Gill

Stem Cell Therapy for Relapsing-Remitting MS

Bonnie, who suffers from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) received a combination of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and adipose-derived cells administered daily over the course of 5 days.

Just wanted to send an update as I am really excited! I received my very first stem cells on 10/22/13, it has been less then a month and I am happy to report that I have tons more energy by balance is improving every day, I have no more foot drop and not even a healing I was looking for but I put my glasses on the other day only to find they made my vision blurry I didn’t need them, I am already saving for my next treatment! I can’t thank you all enough as I feel like I have a future with my 5 small children now, if you ever need someone to talk to future patients I would be happy to scream my praises! Looking forward to more and more improvement!

Sincerely,
Bonnie Barrington

For more information about MS clinical investigations at the Stem Cell Insitute: Stem Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

Sam Harrell demonstrates his progress after receiving umbilical cord stem cells + fat stem cells for multiple sclerosis

Texas high school Hall of Fame football coach Sam Harrell talks about his progress after undergoing several stem cell treatments for secondary progressive multiple sclerosis at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama.

Sam is speaking from the clinic in Panama while undergoing his fourth 5-day course of combination human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells and fat-derived stromal vascular fraction cells.

“I came by myself this time and that’s just a sign of how much better I’ve gotten. …the last times I’ve come I had to get in a wheel chair [off the plane] and I just walked through the airport this time. People ask me. ‘Do you think it really helps?’. Well, just look! I am walking through the airport with no aids.” [Sam demonstrates how he used to walk before treatment] “I took little steps. If I needed to turn around, I had to do like this.” [Sam demonstrates a slow, shuffling turn] “I don’t have a rope but now I can jump rope.” [sam demonstates jumping rope and walks quickly around the room demonstrating quick changes in directions] “Before, I couldn’t jump rope. I couldn’t do any of that. Now I can do those things. I used to have to think about my steps. I’d have to think about right leg, and left leg and now I don’t have to think. I catch myself doing that. I walk somewhere and I think, ‘hey I didn’t have to think about walking from there to there. I just got up and walked like I used to. Now I can make quick moves. I couldn’t do any of that before.”

“…I coached football and I had to retire. I never thought I’d coach football again. Just this last year, I coached football again. Amazing. I thought I would never do that again. I coached this past year and I plan on doing it again. I’m thank to the Stem Cell Institute in Panama and I am thankful to God above. He’s smiling on me too. It’s an amazing story, I think.”

Sam Harrell Texas High School Football Hall of Fame: http://www.brownwoodnews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=10918:harrell-to-be-inducted-into-the-texas-high-school-football-hall-of-fame&catid=39:sports&Itemid=62

Links:

Stem Cell Therapy for MS

More Patient Stories

Stem cell therapy for knees, osteoarthritis and autoimmune disorders: King Goff

King Goff received three applications of his own adipose tissue-derived stem cells over the course of 3 days for a knee injury and autoimmune issues at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama. In this video, Mr. Goff discusses conventional treatments he received before stem cells, pre-treatment symptoms, post-treatment improvements, the doctors and staff, and the clinic.

“My immune system is the thing that is noticeably better. My allergies have corrected. The sinusitis circumstances that I was having problems with have corrected, in part but not completely. My knees, I’m up to being able to be on fairly distant walks of one and a half to two miles as part of my exercise program without the pain that I experienced prior to the [stem cell] treatment. Those are the most significant gains that I can say; just a lack of pain and increased mobility.” – King Goff

Stem Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis: Kelley Wilson

April 17, 2013

Kelley Wilson Stem Cell Therapy for MSI grew up no stranger to Multiple Sclerosis as my father was diagnosed in 1970 at the age of 30 – I was in the 5th grade.

I watched my father deteriorate through the years progressing from walking with a cane, spring assist in his shoes to lift the toe, to hand crutches, his inability to control his bladder and bowels, to being permanently bound to a wheel chair by 1979. Building all sorts of ramps, elevators and installing van lifts so that he could be able to get around by himself. He is still alive and wearing out electric wheel chairs to this day.

I had a few problems with my eyes in 1981, which they tested me for MS knowing my father’s history, but everything at that time came up negative (no MRIs used at that time). I then had a problems with my eyes & speech (blurry & slurring – which dissipated that day) in the summer of 2003, which the doctors preliminary diagnosis was a mild stroke, but then the test began. The outcome came on November 10th, 2003 from my neurologists – you have MS. This just about devastated me having watched the progression (walking to not walking, loss of bowel & bladder control, and loss of mobility & arms, etc.).

Well, they started me on Betaseron, and then the fun began. The first nine (9) months on Betaseron was a roller-coaster of emotions, periods of not having any concentration, and not being able to remember how to do little things that I’ve done for twenty some-odd years. Thank “GOD” for my loving wife (Kim) for getting me through this time..

After making it through the first nine months, things settled, but the MS progressed. Legs burning, legs jerking, walking becoming difficult, hands trembling, lots of floaters in my eyes and twitching. Continued my appointments with my neurologists and as things progressed, more meds prescribed.

In April of 2009, they conducted more test including an Evoke Potential (hooked me up to electrodes and actually got me to levitate off of a table when the zapped me) and more MRIs, etc. These test resulted in a diagnosis of Myasthenia Gravis in conjunction with the MS. More meds prescribed.

In the fall of 2011, walking was very difficult, writing was a joke (if someone other than myself was reading it), having lots of bladder and bowel issues (everything seemed to be leaking) and if I had to travel with my job, I had be chauffeured, as I couldn’t make the trips by myself. Hot weather made me wilt like a cut flower out of water. With all of this going on with my body, the neurologists ordered up another batch of test and then concluded that Betaseron had out lived its effectiveness and I was changed to Copaxon.

After a month of Copaxon, I was having whelps and redness appear at the injections site, which I called the folks at Copaxon and my neurologists and explained what was happening. Both told me it just took a little while for my body to adjust and they would go away. Another month passed and I was doing the injections in my thigh, when the swelling and inflammation became so bad I couldn’t hardly put on my jeans and could hardly walk, so I marched down to my neurologists and sat in her office until she could see me. She took one look at the sites and said that I was allergic to Copaxon, and changed the meds to Avonex – oh joy. I had to undergo 21 days of steroid treatment prior to beginning Avonex.

It’s now February of 2012 and things are not getting any noticeably better, or slowing down, and I’m getting fed up and not looking forward to what I have seen with my father.. I keep taking the meds and start investigating my options.

A friend had mention to my wife about stem cell therapy that they had heard about down in Costa Rica. We researched it and found it in Panama, started checking it out and we liked what we read..

I submitted the initial applications in late March and received approval in April (just 7 days later). Just so happened that The Stem Cell Institute – Panama was having a seminar that month in Gilbert, AZ, so we signed up and flew to Phoenix (we wanted a little more comfort factor). We were very impressed & actually was able to talk with the doctors (Neil Riordan and Dr. Paz Rodriguez) and go over everything (also met one person that had been through the treatment that had a spinal cord injury, one that has MS and both where doing pretty good, as their stories were documented on film and a part of the presentation) .

The seminar was very good and we were sold on the fact that we had made the right decision. .

After arriving back home, we submitted for a treatment to get in the queue’ (which we were told would take as long as 5 months to find an opening), and received notification that it would be on May 14th, 2012, so we confirmed the reservations and began preparing for our trip.

At this time I had quit smoking and the current list of drugs was as follows:

  • Amantadine: 100mg (2 tablets in AM)
  • Effexor: 75mg (1 tablet daily)
  • Zanaflex: 4mg (1/2 in AM & 1 at night)
  • Plavix: 75mg (once daily)
  • Crestor: 5mg (1 tablet at night)
  • Mestinon: 60mg (1 tablet in 4 times daily)
  • Mirapex: 0.125 mg (30 minutes before bedtime)
  • Ampyra :10mg (1 tablet in am & 1 tablet in PM
  • Avonex: 30mcg injection (once a week)

A week prior to our trip to Panama I had a regularly schedule appointment with my neurologists and at the end of the office visit I informed her of my intentions of going to Panama. I did not receive any negative response, she just want to make sure of the procedure that was going to be conducted and where the stem cells were coming from. She also relayed that she was an investigator for stem cell research for the State of Texas.


Here’s a log of the adventure to Panama. Anxiety is high

5/13 (Sunday):
Flew to Panama from Amarillo. Left Amarillo at 9:30AM & arrived in Panama at 7:30PM (had a little trouble with my legs from Houston to Panama – spasms). We were met by Stem Cell Institute (SCI) representative at the airport & walked though customs, like you have never seen. Escorted through and express line at customs, escorted us to a lounge and then they went to go retrieve our luggage. SCI had transportation set up from the airport to your hotel, via private courier.

5/14 (Monday):
Picked up at the hotel by SCI and taken to the SCI office & met with 3 doctors and had blood taken (11 vials). All the doctors were great (Dr. Rodriguez, Dr, Hernandez and Dr. Bowen) and explained everything in great detail. Discussed the surgery (mini-liposuction the next morning). The stem cells were harvested from my own body – no umbilical cord cells utilized. SCI driver took us back to the hotel.

5/15 (Tuesday):
Picked up by SCI and taken to the hospital @ 8:00AM. A little anxious about the facilities that we were going to, but when we drove up the signage on the building read “Hospital Punta Pacifica, affiliated with John Hopkins Medicine International”.- no more worries. I was met at the door by Dr. Bowen (from Stem Cell), admitted to hospital and surgery @ 10:00am, out of surgery recovery by 12:15pm, given pain pills & antibiotics, Dr. Bowen was in surgery & with me throughout the procedure. The plastic surgeon that performed the procedure was from the States. SCI driver takes us back to the hotel. Took only one pain pill for the entire time. Have to wear a girdle (Velcro & elastic) for twenty-one days.

5/16 (Wednesday):
SCI picks us up at 9:30AM for 10:00am appointment for physical therapy. Stretching exercises and a small work out. Driver takes us back to hotel.

5/17 (Thursday):
Same as yesterday

5/18 (Friday):
Same as yesterday.

5/19 (Saturday):
Took a tour to the rainforest & the lake on the top of the canal. Saw, sloths, monkeys, butterflies coatis, toucan & crocodiles (all in the wild) – (gone 6 hours)

5/20 (Sunday):
Took a tour to the waterfall and zoo. (gone 7 hours)

5/21 (Monday): SCI picks us up at 9:30AM for 10:00am appointment for physical therapy. Last day of physical therapy. Diver takes us back to hotel. Kim found a casino at the Sheraton Inn & we went for a little while.

5/22 (Tuesday):
Took a tour through the Panama Canal Locks & up to the lake. We met a couple of others folks at the motel that evening that were down from the States to have the treatment. One gentleman had come down for his second set of treatments and was expounding as to how great his progress had been, and was hoping that with this set that he could be able to walk without a cane. His first set of treatments was about eight months prior. Ok, now I’m getting very anxious.

5/23 (Wednesday):
SCI picks us up at 9:30AM for 10:00am appointment to receive 1st infusion of stem cells. Received 20cc which took about 15 minutes, once I got back to the examination room. . Driver took me back to the hotel – back before 10:30AM. After lunch, Kim asked if I was feeling any effect from the first treatment and I barked back that it takes months for the effects to take place (sorry that I made that comment). Kim had inquired and found another casino, so we took a trip to the Wyndum Casino. After about 2 hours (at about 8:00PM) I noticed that I wasn’t limping, or staggering, dragging my foot, or any of that other good stuff – I went to find Kim. Found Kim & asked her what she thought about my walking and she was really surprised.

5/24 (Thursday):
SCI picks us up at 10:15AM for 10:30am appointment to receive 2nd infusion of stem cells. Told the Dr. (Randy Bowen) about my walking and he was very surprised. I also relayed that the floaties that I have had in my eyes are diminishing, the tingling in my hands is diminishing & my feet don’t feel like they are on fire, bladder control is doing better. Driver took me back to the hotel. Had lunch and then started just messing around and found that I could balance on one leg (either leg) with my hands in my pockets (been quite a while since I was able to balance like that, even without my hands in my pockets) Went to the casino for a little while.

5/25 (Friday):
SCI picks us up at 9:30AM for 10:00am appointment to receive 3rd infusion of stem cells from the Dr. (Hernandez) & he said that he had heard from Dr. Bowen about my results, so I showed him the balance act which he was very impressed with. Both He & Dr. Bowen stated that I was fortunate to have results so quickly, but should continue receiving more results up to at least 6 months. They asked that I keep them apprised of any and all progress. Received pack of documentation covering everything that was done by SCI (complete blood analysis & certification of 6.6*E7 >75% viable stem cells). They also apprised me that they have retained 50% of the stem cells harvested for utilization at a future date – which is only a one week trip. Dr. Hernandez said that I could start decreasing my medications gradually. (Driver took me back to the hotel. Off we go to the Wynndum Casino for a couple of hours. Walking is getting better.

5/26 (Saturday):
Tired today, slept until 11:45AM, then went to grab lunch, laid back down at 1:30PM and slept until 4:30PM. Went and grabbed a few beers at the hotels bar. I haven’t been able to walk, or see like this in 6 years.

5/27 (Sunday):
SCI Driver pick us up at 7:00AM and assisted through the line at the airport. Arrived back in Amarillo at 8:00PM. Had a little trouble with my legs (Spasms) from Houston to Amarillo, but nothing like it had been for the past 5 years.

5/28 (Monday):
Went to the shop & office – didn’t do much. Had supper with our daughters and they couldn’t believe how I was walking. My wife insisted that I show them the balancing act. Girdle & levis, don’t go together very well.

The facilities and doctors are really great. Very professional, very clean, very informative and they help you with anything that you need.


With the results that I was seeing in the first week, I stopped taking a lot of my meds.

On June 16th we took a trip and drove to Ft. Smith, AR (444 miles) to attend a barbeque cook for my friends. Amazingly I had no spasms or leg jerks on the trip over or back, and I tolerated the heat exceedingly well. The only meds that I was still taking at this juncture was Zanaflex and Effexor.

In mid-July I was sleeping like a rock and awakening maybe just once an evening. No more one hour sleeps and then run to the bathroom – no more leg jerks – no more spasms. I had also traveled to one my friends ranch and was out in +97° weather and had no problems.

The first part of August, Kim had purchased a guided fly fishing float trip in Oregon. Ok, now I’m a little skeptical, but here I go. We fished for five days out of boats, floating down the rivers with fly rods. You had to stand up in the boats that were moving with the currents and going through rough water. Amazingly, I never lost my balance. Life is good. Completely off of ALL meds.

After arriving back from Oregon, I had a scheduled appointment with my neurologist. I informed her that I was totally off all of my meds, which she raised an eyebrow upon, then she ran me through the paces for balance, strength, eyes, and walking. She seemed impressed but didn’t say a whole lot, but what she said I really loved. I was discharged from all follow-ups and associated test until such time as I felt that I needed to see her.

The Stem Cell Institute still calls periodically (and sends questionnaires) to check on my conditions and inquire if I need anything additional, which is great. I have very few doctors, or clinics, that have ever called to check on me.

At the writing of this, I am one month from my one year anniversary of the treatment and I cannot express what a change in life it has been. I’m no longer in pain. I’m not irritable. I’m happy. I can walk. I don’t have to worry where the restrooms are located. I can jog (if I wanted too). I can work outside in the summer. My family and friends are astonished with my progress. It is like you rolled the life clock back twenty years.

If this procedure was available fifteen years ago, my father would not have had a say. I would have loaded him on a plane and he would have gone to Panama,

I strongly recommend this procedure and The Stem Cell Institute. They and their staff treat you like a king and you become part of their family. It is life changing Thank “GOD” for the pioneers in medicine.

Anyone reading this that would like to discuss my progress, or any of the above, may feel free to contact me at (Number available upon request to all approved applicants).

Sincerely,

Kelley R. Wilson.

Stem Cell Treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis – Arminda Bourin

Arminda Bourin has suffered from rheumatoid arthritis since 2003. She underwent adult stem cell therapy at the Stem Cell Institute in February 2012 because her swollen, painful ankles made it very difficult for her to walk. This interview takes place approximately one year after treatment.

Before coming to Panama, Ms. Bourin tried everything from anti-inflammatory and auto-immune medication to homeopathy and finally surgery on her left ankle, “Which I regret because if I had waited [until after the stem cell therapy], it would not have been necessary. The other foot with the same symptoms is now better without any surgery. I think it was the stem cells.”

Ms. Bourin learned about the Stem Cell Institute from her husband’s cousin, Judi Lecoq. Judy received treatment for multiple sclerosis and, “…told us how wonderful the treatment was and that she was so much better.”

Regarding the doctors, staff and clinic, “They are wonderful. Everybody has been so kind.”

Upon being asked, “Has this treatment changed your life?” Ms. Bourin responded, “Well, yes. I was not walking too much. I needed a wheelchair. It was painful anyway. So to be able to go shopping, that’s a miracle!”

Stem Cell Treatments for Cerebral Palsy – Mary Washington’s Story

Sarah Washington and her daughter Mary. Mary is 2 years old and was diagnosed with cerebral palsy when she was 4 months old. She was first treated at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama using human umbilical cord-derived stem cells. Mary received these stem cells intravenously over the course of 4 days. Her first treatment was in September of 2012. This interview was recorded in March 2013 at the clinic while she was there for a second round of treatments.

What kind of improvements have you noticed?

Overall, in general, what we noticed was, her upper body, she’s very stiff. She’s spastic in her legs and her arms and she has low tone in her trunk. In her upper body, we noticed a pretty significant improvement. Her range of motion, she couldn’t lift her arms over her before and now she can do that on both sides easily. And her hands, she was in tight little fists most of the time, whereas now if she is in a fist it’s very loose. But most of the time she kind of has her hands relaxed. That was a big improvement for us; small but significant for our family.

Her vision has improved, not necessarily distance but as far as like what I think as seeing details. So she would be able to tell the difference between you and me if we didn’t say anything. Whereas before, I don’t think she could do that. She would rely on smell and hearing more than her vision. Now she uses her vision a lot more. So that’s been an improvement that we’ve seen.
She is more involved in the world around her. [She] wants to be more involved in the world around her so that’s good. She has definitely, she doesn’t say, “mama, dada, ba, ba” yet but she definitely is making more vocalizations, making more sounds and trying to experiment with her voice, which is a positive thing.

She is trying different ways of communicating versus just screaming which is what she did before because that is all she knew how to do. And now, she is kind of fussing or sometimes she’ll just kind of like, yell and stop and wait for me to answer her instead of just going from “zero” to “scream”. So her communication has improved as well.

One thing that we were not expecting that we were pleased about is an improvement in her seizures. That wasn’t even something that we had even, I don’t know. I guess it just didn’t occur to us that maybe this would be helpful with that but before we came the first time in September she had been sick and we actually had to delay our trip twice because she had bronchialitis. She was just having a really hard time. And she was having a lot of seizures. We had to add a new seizure medicine to try to get them under control and she was having 6 or 7 short myotonic jerks every day. The first time we were here, by about Thursday, which was like day three of treatment, of stem cells we noticed that she hadn’t had a seizure that day. Whereas before, she was having 6 or 7 a day. And so, that was one thing. It was surprising but it was a nice surprise that those have improved since we’ve been here. She will still have breakthrough seizures every now and then when she’s sick, teething but she, we haven’t gone back to that, where she was having them on a regular basis. So that’s good. That’s been a good improvement.

Since we’ve been here this time, I haven’t really seen anything where I could say, “Oh, I think that’s the stem cells.” yet but I do know that last time it did take a couple of weeks for us to notice, you know, or to really pinpoint and say, “Yes, we think that is the stem cells. There’s no way she could have done that before.” So, and all of our therapists agree that her range of motion and her upper body for sure, and her vision would not have been the way they were without coming here.