UFC Champion TJ Dillashaw discusses how stem cell therapy in Panama cleared up his psoriasis

UFC bantamweight World Champion TJ Dillashaw discusses a side effect of his stem cell treatment at Stem Cell Institute in Panama with its founder, Neil Riordan, PA, PhD during dinner in Panama.

Dr. Riordan – I am talking about the last time you were down here.

TJ – I’ve been learning a lot about what the stem cell therapy did for me. Stuff that I didn’t even know it was going to do until I listened to you on the [Joe Rogan] podcast [with Mel Gibson]. And one was it got rid of my psoriasis.

Dr. Riordan – And where was your psoriasis?

TJ – My scalp. I had it for like six years. I thought changing my diet and all this stuff would help it out but I think what really helped it was coming down and getting stem cells.

Dr. Riordan – And how long was it after you got treated that you felt the difference?

TJ – Shoot. I didn’t notice for probably a couple months, I think is when I figured it out. I had it really bad but a couple months later it was completely gone.

Dr. Riordan – Wow.

TJ – I had it for six years, you know? Yeah.

Stem Cell Therapy for Autism – Brady B’s Story

Interview with the parents of Brady B, during his second round of stem cell therapy for autism at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama using *umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

For more information, visit: https://www.cellmedicine.com/stem-cell-therapy-for-autism/

*umbilical cords donated after normal, healthy births

Interview Transcript

Interviewer: Today is December 22nd 2017. Please give your names.

Michele: Steve and Michelle Bacon and this is Brady.

Interviewer: Brady’s diagnosis?

Michele: Brady was diagnosed when he was two and a half with autism.

Interviewer: So, this would be his second stem cell treatment?

Michelle: Umm, hmm.

Interviewer: The first treatment was performed when?

Michelle: April, 2017.

Interviewer: Can you describe his improvements?

Michelle: The first round of stem cells, after the second infusion, we were putting him to bed that night and he said spontaneously, without any requests or anything, us prompting, nothing…his first 3-word sentence. He said, “I want pizza.”

Steve: When Brady was diagnosed he was, or is diagnosed as non-verbal. So that was a complete surprise that he came up with a spontaneous 3-word phrase.

Michelle: And before that, he had only been doing like “echoing” and a lot of it was not understandable to everyone. I mean, we understood because we know him but other people wouldn’t have been able to understand.

Steve: Since stem cells, he’s become more patient and able to wait for things and not have to quick go and do something. He can stand in a line and wait now.

Michelle: He’s more… His school reported that he is more tolerant of transitions, like when they’re transitioning from a preferred activity to, like, work, like a work sheet – school stuff.

Steve: He’s able to read some sight words now since…

Michelle: About 30. Yeah, he can read words now. He wasn’t able to do that before. He can… It started out just recognizing like, from an array of three pictures, and then he would have like, “apple” or “banana” and he’d have a horse and a pencil and a banana and he cold match the word “banana” to the picture. And he would trade out the words and he could correctly identify which word went with which picture. And now, all we need is the flashcard of the word, no pictures, just like “horse” or “yellow”. And he can identify about 30 words. 30 or 40 words.

Steve: And he can now read some simple sentences with the sight words in it that he knows. And this is all new since stem cell treatments.

Michelle: Yeah, a lot more tolerant. Eye contact is better. He seeks out peers to play now whereas he didn’t before. Greetings are better – like “Hi” and “Bye”. Still working on the eye contact though. That one’s still kind of tough. He can look at you in a mirror, do eye contact in a mirror but the face is a little hard still.

Interviewer: Ok, anything else that you’d like to mention?

Michelle: Anything else guys?

Brother: He’s my brother.

Sister: [Inaudible]

Steve: More interactive with peers and family members.

Michelle: He’s definitely more interactive with everyone.

Interviewer: Ok.

Michelle: And no.. Oh yeah! He used to, it was hard always to get him to come out of his room. He would just want to sit in his room and play on his iPad and now he actually comes out and he sits with us a lot more. And he’s a lot more interactive with the family. We used to have a hard time getting him to stay at the table for dinner and now, he stays at the table no problems. He used to have meltdowns that would last 20 or 30 minutes. Now, he turns around in like, a minute. It’s so much better. His temperament is a lot better. I mean, he’s always been a very good boy but he gets rigid about things, you know? If he doesn’t have it just that way, it’s a 20 – 30 minute meltdown – before. Now, it’s much better.

Interviewer: Ok. That’s it. Thank you very much.

Everyone (including Brady): Cheese!

Video: Stem Cell Therapy in Panama with Dr. Riordan and Mel Gibson

Host Michael Beattie discusses stem cell therapy using *human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCT-MSCs)  at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama with renowned applied stem cell scientist and founder, Neil Riordan, Pa, PhD and acclaimed actor, director and producer Mel Gibson.

Dr. Riordan discusses the miraculous progress of a spinal cord injury patient and pilot whose doctors said that he would never walk again.  He talks about where the stem cells come from, how they work and why they can treat so many seemingly different conditions.  Dr. Riordan explains how umbilical cords, and subsequently, hUCT-MSCs used at the Stem Cell Institute are carefully selected using molecular screening.  He also discusses why mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cords function better than MSCs from adults, especially as they age or if they are suffering from a disease like multiple sclerosis.  For example. MSCs from a newborn multiply exponentially compared to MSCs from an older adult.

Mel Gibson discusses his father’s miraculous recovery, literally from his deathbed after receiving hUCT-MSCs at the age of 92.  He’s currently 99 and still going strong having been treated in Panama several times since then.  Mel also discusses his personal experiences in Panama.

Watch all this and more.

*umbilical cord tissue harvested after normal, healthy births

Stem Cell Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis

Image of Stem Cell Therapy Patient Marth Phillips

A Miracle for Martha
A woman’s journey of deliverance from pain

By Deanna Kirk Daily Sun Nov 26, 2017 (Link to original story)

The last 12 months have been a giant series of ups and downs, an extreme roller coaster for Martha Phillips.

Last December, her father-in-law battled brain cancer, which affected the lives of all of her close family; and her only brother died very suddenly from a pulmonary embolism. They were buried a week apart.

The battle with Multiple Sclerosis

Martha had been fighting her own battle against Multiple Sclerosis since a diagnosis in 2010. This disease causes the body’s immune system to attack its own tissues, and the malfunction destroys myelin, the fatty substance that coats and protects nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Phillips’ had seen her own ups and downs in that battle as well, with medications that caused huge weight gain, severe intolerance to heat, and intense bouts with pain. She tried many different protocols and medications, but what seemed to make the most difference was an extreme dietary change, which led to a loss of 72 pounds, acupuncture, adjustments, and regular massage therapy. Under the care of Dr. William “Doc” Davis in Ennis, she went from 10 prescriptions down to two, and did quite well for nearly six years.

But after the bout with all the stress during December 2016, Phillips discovered her body just could not cope with all the continuous stress demands placed upon it, and she suffered a pretty severe setback. She was forced to go on disability from her job.

“The Tysybri I was having infused regularly has a black box warning,” Phillips said. “I had to sign paperwork when I started taking it, that I knew it could kill me.”

The neurologist offered several other choices of medications, but all were either equally as risky with not as many good results, or more risky with even worse results.

“To me, it felt like my only choice was going backwards, and to me that was unacceptable,” she said.

Phillips learned about a somewhat-new innovative treatment for people with Multiple Sclerosis, and it was not being done in the United States yet, but for $25,000 one could fly to Panama City, Panama and have the complete treatment done and stay right in the same hotel where the treatments are done.

The blessings of how all her funding came together to have the treatment were chronicled in a story that ran in the July 8, 2017 edition of the Daily Sun.

But this story is about the trip itself, the treatment, and how her life has been since the trip to Panama.

Life since Panama, and new stem cells

It’s been roughly three months since Phillips returned from Panama. She took her little sister Robine Reeves with her, and the things she noticed right off were 1) the Atlanta airport is awful, and 2) Panama is a lot like Texas with regard to the weather.

“It’s very Americanized — they take American dollars, Spanish is their primary language but it’s OK if you don’t speak it,” Phillips said. “The people in Panama are so super friendly, even the kids. A group of junior high kids got on the bus with us and many of them spoke to us. That was the day Vice President Pence was there, and we, stupid Americans, didn’t know he was there, but his motorcade was very impressive.”

Phillips notice that the Panamanian president’s motorcade also came through that morning, and they watched it all from the rooftop of their hotel where the pool was. And some guy from London had to tell them their own Vice President was there.

“The clinic has a very impressive concierge,” she said. “Someone was there holding a sign with my name on it at the airport. She took us to the VIP lounge and whisked us through customs and the fingerprint deal very quickly and painlessly, and called our driver who works for the clinic. He took us to the hotel, and showed us shopping and restaurants along the way.

“They don’t have really good restaurants, they just look for consistency,” she said.

“The next day, I had a medical checkup and blood work. The second day, they gave me stem cells through an IV. I also had two subcutaneous injections in the groin/lymph region, which were more painful than the IV.”

Phillips also had physical therapy that day which consisted of evaluation, stretching exercises, balance and strength.

“The stems cells they use are umbilical cord stem cells, which women donate when they give birth,” she said. “Since they are brand new, they double every 24 hours. They’re a perfect source because they multiply so fast. I got 1.33 million stem cells.”

The way the stem cells work for MS and some other autoimmune diseases they’re using them for is that they reset the immune system, she said. They do not go in and repair the damage the MS has already done to her brain, but there is scientific evidence that shows if MS stops attacking the body, the body can heal the brain and spinal lesions.

“They believe that because there’s another virus that does the same kind of damage to your brain, but because it does not continue to attack the brain, people recover from it,” Phillips said.

There was another day of treatment just like the previous day, then the following day the sisters flew home. On the day of the blood work and checkup, the doctor discussed diet and supplements with Martha.

“He started describing a high fat, low carb diet, and I said, ‘Do you mean a keto diet?’ and he said ‘Yes,’” she said. “He said I would be throwing my $25,000 down the drain if I did NOT follow this diet and take supplements.”

Phillips had already followed this diet in the past, but wasn’t following it very strictly at the time.

Her supplement list looked something like this: 2000 mg per day of Magnesium; B vitamins; CoQ10; Stemkline; Probiotics; and a lot of it is supposed to be for energy as well as for brain health.

“When I went to Panama, I was taking 10 prescriptions,” she said. “I am taking one now, 90 days later.

“That all actually happened within the first two weeks.

“I feel amazing. I feel like I can conquer the world. I’ve had more energy than I’ve had the entire time I’ve had MS.”

Philips said when she made her trip to Panama, her thought was if she could get rid of enough of the pain and fatigue in order to return to work, she would be happy.

“But I got SO much more — I actually have no symptoms right now.”

She’s also no longer a slave to heat intolerance. Before, when she went to CrossFit, she had to wear a cooling vest full of ice packs and stand in front of a giant fan or A/C unit in order to work out. The least little bit of heat would cause her to become very, very sick.

“The first time I worked out after my transplant, Nick (Biles) came over to check on me, and I cried and said ‘I can’t remember the last time I worked out without heat intolerance,’” she said.

The heat intolerance makes the MS Symptoms you have temporarily worse until your body cools down. That can happen with one degree of change in body temperature, she said.

“It’s really weird to me now, to learn how to live without thinking about all those things,” Phillips said. “For so long, I’ve had to consider all sorts of eventualities in every scenario I find myself in.”

Sam Harrell at Texas State House Public Hearing on Stem Cell Therapy HB810

Multiple Sclerosis patient and stem cell therapy recipient, Sam Harrell, speaks before the Texas State House Public Health Committee about how stem cell therapy at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama improved his life.

Sam’s testimony:

Chairman my name is Sam Harrell. I’m from Ennis Texas. I represent myself and I’m here in favor of House Bill 810. I’m just a football coach. That’s all I’ve ever been. There’s nothing easy about that but it’s all I’ve ever wanted to do, and I love what I do, and I’m doing what I love. I feel like the luckiest guy in the world. But I’d done that all my life and I was head coach in Ennis Texas, and everything was going great, and I had all these big plans and dreams, and in 2005 I was diagnosed with MS. At first it didn’t show up much so my wife and I didn’t tell a lot of people, but from 2005 to 2009 I’d gone where you couldn’t even notice anything to coaching out of a golf cart. Couldn’t stand up, couldn’t walk on my own, so in 2009 I had to retire from coaching, and in 2010 I had to retire completely from education, not because I wanted to, but because of MS.

During that time I was going to see the best guys, and they’re great guys in Dallas, and their heart’s in the right place, and they had me on MS meds and obviously not much was helping. That’s what they tell you about the meds. They won’t get you better. They just hope to slow it down.

Well, from 2005 to 2009, I went from coaching and walking and working out in the sun to not being able to walk and sit at home using a walker every day, so that slow down process wasn’t very slow in my mind. A friend of mine told me about Preston Walker, who went down to Central America for stem cells. Fortunately, in 2010, I found myself in Panama getting stem cells, and I fast-forwarded to 2014. I was doing so well again that I said, “I think I could coach again.” And I started again at Fort Worth Christian high school, and I’ve being doing that for the last three years. I get up every day, throw on my shorts and my tennis shoes and move again, and I never dreamed I’d do that. And it’s all because of adult stem cells in Panama. And that’s why I’m for this bill, house bill 810. I appreciate your time so much.

Stem Cell Therapy for Autism: John Guerriero Interview with Neil Riordan, PhD, PA

John Guerriero discusses the progress of his son Anthony with Neil Riordan, PhD, PA after undergoing stem cell therapy at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama. Anthony was treated with human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The umbilical cords were donated by mothers following normal, healthy births.

Stem Cell Thearpy for Autism – Interview with Stephen Lallo and Neil Riordan, PhD, PA

Stephen Lallo discusses his son Jack’s improvements after undergoing stem cell therapy at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama. The treatments us human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The umbilical cords are donated by mothers following normal, healthy births.

Stem Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis – Wes Meadlock

Transcription from Telephone Interview with MS stem cell patient, Wes Meadlock.

I’ll start from the beginning and tell you what I know.

In 2011, I started feeling something was wrong, and went to a neurologist here in town, went to his MRIs, and all his little testing, and this and that, and he said, “You’ve either got Lyme’s disease or MS.” The reason they said Lyme disease is because we have a place deep in the woods, and we stay there a lot on the weekends for a couple of years, and I got a lot of tick bites. We went through the whole thing of MS or Lyme’s disease, so I was thinking, maybe that’s what I got?

I’m not quite normal but I’m pretty close, at 80-85% of being normal. …but compared to some other people I know who have MS that I’ve done some aquatic classes with, I am far superior to them. I really believe this stuff works.

In the meantime, my father’s wife has had cancer pretty bad a couple of times, and he knows a lot of people at U. of Alabama at Birmingham; a really good hospital. He said, “I know somebody up here who’s really good with MS, why don’t you come up here and have him test you.” So, I went up there in the fall of 2012 and he did his testing, and he was telling me, “You have MS.” He said he could get me into some clinical trials, and I was thinking, “I don’t like pharmaceutical drugs.” I said, “If I could find something else, some other way, I’m going to try it.” I’ve been doing a lot of Internet research and talked to a few other people who said you should try some stem cells, so I did that. I went to Panama the first time. I did the liposuction, and they tried to get 90 million cells from me, and they could only get 45 million. I’m rather thin and wasn’t in too good a health at the time. They said, “We’ll mix it with some umbilical cord to get you the 90 million, so you’ll get 45 of your own and 45 of umbilical, and I think that was a two week ordeal to get that treatment.

I came back home and was feeling so much better. At that particular point I was having a problem walking with my left leg not cooperating, so when I came back from there, I felt like I’d gotten a good bit better. So, I decided to go back the following year. 2013 was the first time I went, and in 2014 they said, “Do you want to do umbilical?” I said no I do not, so they said they’d try something else. It turned out to be the umbilical cord cells, and when I got done a doctor told me, “You should be good for three years.” That’s where I am now, and I decided in the last few months that I need to go back again. When I called they said they had an opening on March the 13th and I said, “Okay, I’ll take it.” I just felt like, basically I don’t do any other drug, and I do believe it helps. The only one I do now is Naltrexone. It’s a 4.5mg dose of that and it sure helps my coordination and my walking. I’m not quite normal but I’m pretty close, at 80-85% of being normal. That’s about where I am now.

I’m not 100% but compared to some other people I know who have MS that I’ve done some aquatic classes with, I am far superior to them. I really believe this stuff works.

When I went back the second time, I’ve noticed a lot of difference there, I’m a full believer that stuff pulled from your own fat, and I’m 62 years old, can’t be as good as umbilical cord stuff and the way they process it. When I first started this they did nothing like it in the states, but they’re doing the liposuction stuff now. I went to a doctor close by here and told him my story, and he was trying to sell his products so he was against my story, but I said, “You need to do a little more research, because what you’re saying isn’t true. I’m a true testament.”

After I talked to him and he fed me a big line of BS, and I said, “You don’t even know what you’re talking about. You do in a sense and you’re trying to sell your product, I understand that, but you’re not hitting the whole base, that’s for sure.”

High-Dose Intravenous Vitamin C Therapy at Riordan Clinic Offers New Hope to Young Cancer Patient After Chemotherapy Fails

WICHITA, KANSAS (PRWEB) NOVEMBER 15, 2016

Hoyt Lee

Hoyt Lee

After undergoing failed chemotherapy treatments and the debilitating side effects that go along with them, things are finally looking up for 6 year-old cancer patient, Hoyt Lee. Since starting high-dose intravenous vitamin C therapy at the Riordan Clinic in Wichita, Kansas two and a half years ago, Hoyt’s condition stabilized and is now improving; something his oncologists said would likely never happen.

At just three months of age, doctors diagnosed Hoyt Lee with Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF-1). At 16 months old, he started chemotherapy for a brain tumor. After completing a grueling year of drug cocktails that wracked his young body, Hoyt’s mother, Shawna Overbey, received the news that she’d feared the most. Hoyt’s tumors were not responding to the chemo. They were growing.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) showed accelerated tumor growth in his optic nerve chiasm. The optic chiasm is an X-shaped structure formed by the crossing of the optic nerves in the brain. The tumor was affecting his right and left eyes, his pituitary gland, and his hypothalamus.

The only available treatment alternatives were radiation or a different chemotherapy cocktail that can cause nerve damage and affect motor skills like walking and hand movement.

That’s when Shawna knew there had to be another way. Countless hours of research lead Shawna and Hoyt to Dr. Ron Hunninghake at the Riordan Clinic, a non-profit organization in Wichita, Kansas that specializes in alternative cancer therapies. The Riordan Clinic was founded in 1975 by Dr. Hugh Riordan and benefactor Olive W. Garvey. It has been providing IV therapy to patients like Hoyt for the past 40 years.

The late Dr. Riordan and his son, Neil H. Riordan, PhD, were pioneers in the use of vitamin C to treat cancer. Far ahead of their time, they invented patents (6,448,287, 6,436,411, 6,284,786) on treating cancer with vitamin C that date back prior to the turn of this century. For the past 20 years, Nina Mikirova, PhD has carried on their cancer research at the clinic.

At present, Neil Riordan, PhD is a renowned applied stem cell therapy researcher whose clinic in Panama, Stem Cell Institute, specializes in treating inflammatory and autoimmune related conditions with human *umbilical cord tissue–derived mesenchymal stem cells. Dr. Riordan has also teamed up with board-certified orthopedic surgeon, Wade McKenna, DO to bring stem cell therapy for orthopedic conditions to Southlake, Texas at the Riordan-McKenna Institute (RMI). RMI uses a proprietary mixture of the patient’s own bone marrow stem cells with *amniotic tissue products. Patients can receive intravenous high-dose vitamin C and other intravenous nutritional supplements at Riordan Wellness, which occupies space at the RMI building in Southlake.

Decades after the Riordans’ pioneering research, ascorbic acid treatment for cancer is entering the mainstream, with clinical trials being conducted at John’s Hopkins, University of Iowa, Jefferson University and Cornell. A clinical trial on vitamin C and prostate cancer was recently completed at Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Denmark and in a study published November 5th in Science, a team of researchers from Weill Cornell Medicine, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Tufts Medical Center, Harvard Medical School and The Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center found that high doses of vitamin C – roughly equivalent to the levels found in 300 oranges – impaired the growth of KRAS mutant and BRAF mutant colorectal tumors in cultured cells and mice.

Since undergoing IV high-dose vitamin C therapy, Hoyt Lee’s progress has been miraculous. According to his mother, MRIs have shown tumor stability or shrinkage over the past two and a half years. The tumor is no longer affecting his right eye, pituitary gland or hypothalamus. As of February 2016, there is almost no sign of a tumor in Hoyt’s optic nerve chiasm. Hoyt is doing so well that he won’t have to return to the hospital for another year.

“As Schopenhauer said, ‘All truth passes through three stages. First, it is ridiculed. Second, it is violently opposed. Third, it is accepted as being self-evident.’,” said Dr. Riordan. “As far as high-dose vitamin C goes, I think that, fortunately, we are finally entering the third stage,’ he added.

“We are delighted with Hoyt’s progress and equally proud that through generous charitable contributions, we’ve been able to do it without the crushing costs that can be associated with conventional treatments like chemotherapy,” commented Donna Kramme, CEO of Riordan Clinic. “It can cost as much as $15,000 per year to treat a child like Hoyt. We ask that everyone who is passionate about helping children like Hoyt please contact the Riordan Clinic to donate today. Without your help we cannot continue vital research that will make Hugh Riordan’s dream four decades ago, a reality today and into the future,” she concluded.

About Riordan Clinic

Riordan Clinic is a not-for-profit 501(c)(3), nutrition-based health facility in Wichita, Kansas. We have integrated lifestyle and nutrition to help you find the underlying causes of your illness. Since our inception in 1975, our mission has been clear and unwavering. Our functional medicine providers “stimulate an epidemic of health.”

People turn to the Riordan Clinic to restore, improve, and maintain health. Our integrative health practitioners listen to the needs of patients. Then we test and measure to map out a research-based, nutrition-fueled path to well being. Together, our professionals move beyond simply treating symptoms to address illness at its cause. Your Way to Well communicates a positive, hope-filled message. It stresses our individualized approach and achieves the best possible outcomes.

Riordan Clinic Website: http://www.riordanclinic.org

Riordan Clinic
3100 N. Hillside Ave.
Wichita, Kansas
67219

Tel: (316) 682-3100
Fax: (316) 682-2062

About Riordan-McKenna Institute (RMI)

RMI specializes in non-surgical treatment of acute and chronic orthopedic conditions using *amniotic tissue allograft and bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) that is harvested using the patented BioMAC bone marrow aspiration cannula. Common conditions treated include meniscal tears, ACL injuries, rotator cuff injuries, runner’s knee, tennis elbow, and joint pain due to degenerative conditions like osteoarthritis.

Additionally, RMI augments orthopedic surgeries with BMAC and amniotic tissue allograft to promote better post-surgical outcomes and uses amniotic membranes as part of a complete wound care treatment regimen.

BMAC contains a patient’s own mesenchymal stem cells (MSC,) hematopoietic stem cells (CD34+), growth factors and other progenitor cells. Amniotic tissue allograft is composed of collagens and other structural proteins, which provide a biologic matrix that supports angiogenesis, tissue growth and new collagen during tissue regeneration and repair.
*Amniotic tissue is donated after normal healthy births.

Riordan-McKenna Institute Website: http://www.rmiclinic.com

Riordan-McKenna Institute
801 E. Southlake Blvd.
Southlake, Texas
76092

Tel: (817) 776-8155
Toll Free: (877) 899-7836
Fax: (817) 776-8154

About Stem Cell Institute Panama

Founded in 2007 on the principles of providing unbiased, scientifically sound treatment options; the Stem Cell Institute (SCI) has matured into the world’s leading adult stem cell therapy and research center. In close collaboration with universities and physicians world-wide, our comprehensive stem cell treatment protocols employ well-targeted combinations of autologous bone marrow stem cells, autologous adipose stem cells, and donor human umbilical cord stem cells to treat: autism, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, heart disease, and autoimmune diseases.

In partnership with Translational Biosciences, a subsidiary of Medistem Panama, SCI provides clinical services for ongoing clinical trials that are assessing safety and signs of efficacy for autism, multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and spinal cord injury using allogeneic umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSC) and hU-MSC-derived mesenchymal trophic factors (MTF). In 2017, Translation Biosciences plans to expand its clinical trial portfolio to include heart disease and cerebral palsy.

For more information on stem cell therapy:

Stem Cell Institute Website: https://www.cellmedicine.com

Aquilino de la Guardia Street
BICSA Financial Center
63rd Floor
Panama City, Panama

*Tissue is donated after normal, healthy births.

How Stem Cell Therapy Saved My Son

autism_hope_alliance_web_liogo_copy

By Susie Reveles September 11, 2016
View Original Interview

Interview with Marty Kelley – Mother, Wife and Stem Cell Advocate

kelley-family-in-panama
She fought for her son and won. She never gave up and followed her instincts. Her message is one of Hope, Determination and Unconditional Love. The Autism Hope Alliance had the pleasure of learning more about her journey and hearing her story.

Autism Hope Alliance:

Can you tell us what is Stem Cell Therapy and why you are so passionate about it?

Marty Kelley:

We received stem cell therapy at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama, which is where all of Ken’s treatments have taken place, they use stem cells harvested from donated human umbilical cord tissue after normal, healthy births called mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Umbilical cord tissue is a rich source of the most potent MSCs, which modulate the immune system and possess anti-inflammatory properties. Each donating mother is tested for infectious diseases and has her medical history screened. Proper consent is received from each family prior to donation. Before they are approved for use in treatment all umbilical cord-derived stem cells are screened for infectious diseases to International Blood Bank Standards. Only a small percentage of donated umbilical cords pass the rigorous screening process.

The actual treatments are relatively simple. There are just several quick intravenous injections of the purified MSCs over the course of several days. Each injection only takes a few minutes. Autism (and its degree of severity) has been significantly correlated with elevated levels of macrophage-derived cytokines (MDC) and thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), both of which are implicated in neuro-inflammation. Intravenous administration of umbilical cord MSCs can reduce inflammation in the brain and throughout the body, thus lowering the levels of MDC and TARC and improving a child’s symptoms. This is the rationale behind the treatment, which is currently in the process of being tested in controlled clinical trials.

Autism Hope Alliance:

What changes if any did you see in your son after doing it?

Marty Kelley:

After doing our first stem cell treatment, Kenneth started talking about the past for the first time! Within a few months, he was able to have simple conversation and at nine months after the cells, Kenneth potty trained and started reading. It was a few months before his ninth birthday.

ken-kelley-with-dog

Autism Hope Alliance:

How long before you noticed any changes?

Marty Kelley:

Before stem cells, my husband and I categorized Ken as moderately to severely autistic. So, it was while we at the Stem Cell Institute getting our first stem cell treatment, where Ken started speaking clearer and adding more words to his limited sentences, we knew the cells were working. Changes continued to occur daily, such as Ken having a concept of time, describing his trip to Panama as “four hours in the car and 8 hours on the plane” in a news interview 2 weeks after getting cells!

Autism Hope Alliance:

What therapies did you do before trying Stem Cell Therapy?

Marty Kelley:

Like most parents on this journey, we tried biomedical intervention intensively before stem cells, starting when Ken was 6 years old. We bought a mild hyperbaric oxygen chamber for our home and treated him for two years with 900 hours of dives. Also, we used around 30 different vitamin supplements as well as the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, along with fermented foods. We used the top autism biomedical doctors at the time (2006-2009), including having Ken’s gastrointestinal issues diagnosed with Dr. Arthur Krigsman at Thoughtful House and QEEG scans to give us markers for improvements.

Autism Hope Alliance:

How did you even hear about stem cell therapy and how did you decide on the clinic to go to?

Marty Kelley:

A news story in Orlando, Florida, introduced us to stem cell therapy and Daniel Faiella, a father who had treated his son at the Stem Cell Institute. I called Daniel every day for two years while I researched adult stem cells. It was still hard to decide on a clinic to use. I chose the Stem Cell Institute because of their reputation and what I researched. And a great quote that sums it all up is, “You cannot always wait for the perfect time, sometimes you must dare to jump.” As long as I was sure that umbilical cord cells would not cause any harm, it was just a matter of taking the “jump.”

Autism Hope Alliance:

Where was your child before Stem Cell Therapy?

Marty Kelley:

Before stem cells, Kenneth was out of control. He could not have a conversation with us. He could not tell us spontaneous things, like what happened at school, if he was sick or hurt, or things he needed. Ken often screamed and yelled and was violent and threw things and would run awayfrom us, ripping his clothes off, running naked. At the time, our physician did not know anything about stem cells, but recommended that we place Ken in an institution because of his out of control behavior. This devastated us.

In a documentary film featuring Ken’s story, we tried to capture the essence of Ken’s life before stem cells and then show the changes from the cells. This film is called Ken’s Journey To Recovery and can be viewed on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FaGf0h20Vw

Autism Hope Alliance:

Paint us a picture of where he is today?

ken-kelley-today

Marty Kelley:

Today, Ken is calm, peaceful, and polite–the sweetest joy in our lives. He is what life should be, happy and caring and intuitive. Ken has a passion for learning, I think because of all of the gaps with the autism. Even his teachers recognize his passion and he recently received an award in History in a mainstream classroom out of 70 neuro-typical peers.

Autism Hope Alliance:

How many stem cell treatments did he get and do you do any therapies with him currently?

Marty Kelley:

From 2009 to 2012, Ken has had six stem cell treatments. We have not had him on any diet or supplements since 2012. Our lives are very normal with limited therapies, except for speech therapy and school. We have not done any biomedical since 2009.

ken-kelley-at-fair

Autism Hope Alliance:

What advice would you give to someone who is thinking of doing Stem Cell Therapy?

Marty Kelley:

If parents were considering stem cells for their child, I would recommend lots of research. Make sure you know that the treatment is safe and find a clinic with a good reputation. And don’t wait. Stem cells are amazing, but, like any medical treatment, it doesn’t work for everyone. For your child, however, it may be worth a try.

“Dream big dreams, small dreams have no magic”

For more info:

www.KensJourneyToRecovery.Blogspot.com

https://www.facebook.com/marty.kelley.9

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FaGf0h20Vw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B6T9MZYM_wY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jyU4m2ZF-pA

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=csJGUbonU4k

*This interview is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. It is for informational purposes only. Each parent knows their child the best and we recommend individuals to consult their doctor before considering any therapy or treatments.