Umbilical Cord Tissue Mesenchymal Stem Cells Best For Clinical Applications

A recent study concluded that umbilical cord tissue is the best source for clinically utilizable mesenchymal stem cells.

Comparative Characterization of Cells from the Various Compartments of the Human Umbilical Cord Shows that the Wharton’s Jelly Compartment Provides the Best Source of Clinically Utilizable Mesenchymal Stem Cells.


Arjunan Subramanian, Chui-Yee Fong, Arijit Biswas, Ariff Bongso

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University Health System, National University of Singapore, Kent Ridge, Singapore, 119228, Singapore

Mesenchymal Stem Cell Harvesting Picture

Abstract

The human umbilical cord (UC) is an attractive source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) with unique advantages over other MSC sources. They have been isolated from different compartments of the UC but there has been no rigorous comparison to identify the compartment with the best clinical utility. We compared the histology, fresh and cultured cell numbers,morphology, proliferation, viability, stemness characteristics and differentiation potential of cells from the amnion (AM), subamnion (SA), perivascular (PV), Wharton’s jelly (WJ) and mixed cord (MC) of five UCs. The WJ occupied the largest area in the UC from which 4.61 ± 0.57 x 106 /cm fresh cells could be isolated without culture compared to AM, SA, PV and MC that required culture. The WJ and PV had significantly lesser CD40+ non-stem cell contaminants (26-27%) compared to SA, AM and MC (51-70%). Cells from all compartments were proliferative, expressed the typical MSC-CD, HLA, and ESC markers, telomerase, had normal karyotypes and differentiated into adipocyte, chondrocyte and osteocyte lineages. The cells from WJ showed significantly greater CD24+ and CD108+ numbers and fluorescence intensities that discriminate between MSCs and non-stem cell mesenchymal cells, were negative for the fibroblast-specific and activating-proteins (FSP, FAP) and showed greater osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation potential compared to AM, SA, PV and MC. Cells from the WJ offer the best clinical utility as (i) they have less non-stem cell contaminants (ii) can be generated in large numbers with minimal culture avoiding changes in phenotype, (iii) their derivation is quick and easy to standardize, (iv) they are rich in stemness characteristics and (v) have high differentiation potential. Our results show that when isolating MSCs from the UC, the WJ should be the preferred compartment, and a standardized method of derivation must be used so as to make meaningful comparisons of data between research groups.

The researchers considered the following factors in their in-depth analysis:

  • Fresh live cell counts
  • Cell counts after culture
  • Cell morphology
  • Cell proliferation
  • Cell viability
  • CD marker analysis
  • Telomerase analysis (TRAP assay)
  • Pluripotent marker analysis
  • Genomic markers
  • Cell differentiation
  • Degrees of differentiation

Click the link below to read the entire article.

Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Umbilical Cord Tissue Are Best in Clinical Applications

Why Stem Cells Work: Clinical Trials for Spinal Cord Injury, Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy

Neil Riordan, PhD speaks at the Riordan-McKenna Institute and Stem Cell Institute fall seminar in Southlake, Texas on October 10, 2015.

Dr. Riordan discusses:

  • How our lab selects uses specialized screening techniques to select only the stem cells that we know will be the most useful for our patients. Only about 1 in 100 cords pass this screening process.
  • How umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) control inflammation, modulate the immune system and stimulate regeneration.
  • How the number and function of our own stem cells decline over time.
  • How MSC secretions promote healing
  • Where MSCs are found in our body
  • First clinic trial in the US using umbilical cord tissue-derived stem cells
  • How MSC doubling times dramatically decrease as people age, which is why cord cells are much more robust than a patient’s own cells as they age
  • The origin of Medistem Lab in Panama
  • Why the Stem Cell Institute and Medistem Labs are in Panama
  • Stem cell therapy laws and approvals around the world
  • Global interest in mesenchymal stem cell therapy research
  • Current clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells
  • Clinical trials in Panama
  • Collaborations with corporations and educational institutions
  • Mesenchymal stem cell selection, donor selection, and testing
  • Brief tour of Medistem Panama stem cell laboratory
  • Isolation and production of mesenchymal stem cells
  • Discovery of mesenchymal stem cells in menstrual blood
  • Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell studies for rheumatoid arthritis
  • The role of T-regulatory cells in rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis
  • Treating spinal cord injuries with mesenchymal stem cells
  • Mechanism of mesenchymal stem cells on spinal cord injury. They are not becoming tissue. It’s their secretions that allow the spinal cord to heal itself.
  • Umbilical cord MSC studies on spinal cord injury
  • Data from Stem Cell Institute spinal cord injury patients
  • Video from treated spinal cord injury patients
  • Postnatal MSC safety
  • MSCs and cancer risk – MSCs have been shows to actually inhibit tumor growth

Stem Cell Therapy: Study finds that autologous bone marrow disc injections significantly reduce lumbar disc pain

A study published last year (2015) in the scientific journal Stem Cells entitled “Percutaneous injection of autologous bone marrow concentrate significantly reduces lumbar discogenic pain through 12 months”, reported that patients suffering from chronic back pain due to degenerative disc disease who were treated by injecting their own bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) into their lumbar discs experienced significant pain reduction 12 months after treatment.

Woman Back PainDegenerative disc disease (DDD) is a term used to describe normal changes in spinal discs as one ages. Spinal discs separate the spinal vertebrae and act as shock absorbers that allow the spine to twist, bend and flex. DDD usually affects the discs in the lower back (lumbar) or the neck (cervical).

DDD in lumbar discs can cause lower back pain, osteoarthritis, abnormal disc bulging (herniated disc) and spinal stenosis (narrowing of the tunnel-like space that holds the spinal cord), any of which can exert pressure on spinal nerves and the spinal cord causing pain and affecting nerve function.

BMAC contains mesenchymal stem cells and CD34+ stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote tissue growth including cartilage and CD34+ stem cells can promote tissue vascularization, thus increasing blood supply to new or damaged tissue.

The researchers studied 26 patients who were suffering from discogenic lower back pain. Patients were followed up at 3, 6, and 12 months.

After 12 months, 21 out of 26 patients experienced statistically significant improvements in pain scores and impairment. The most dramatic improvements were seen in patients with higher stem cell counts.

The original publication can be found here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/stem.1845/epdf

At Riordan-McKenna Institute, Dr. Riordan’s orthopedic stem cell clinic in Dallas-Fort Worth, Dr. McKenna performs a procedure for degenerative disc disease that is similar to the one described in the Stem Cell Journal study.

However, Dr. McKenna augments the BMAC injections with *AlphaGEMS amniotic tissue product. AlphaGEMS is a pliable tissue allograft (transplant) derived from human placental amnion, which contains over 100 growth factors and functions as a biologic structural matrix to facilitate and enhance tissue healing and repair. The inclusion of AlphaGEMS adds a new dimension to the tissue repair process that was successfully tested in the cited study.

“Since we perform lumbar disc injections with BMAC and AphaGEMS at RMI, we are encouraged to see an independent study published that shows the effectiveness of a similar procedure for patients suffering from discogenic lumbar back pain,” states Riordan-McKenna Institute Medical Director, Wade McKenna, DO.

For more information about BMAC and AlphaGEMS treatment at RMI, please visit: http://www.rmiclinic.com/non-surgical-stem-cell-injections-joint-pain/stemnexa-protocol/

If you are suffering from degenerative disc disease and would like to be evaluated for treatment at RMI, the first step is to complete an online medical history. Once we receive it, our staff will contact you to answer general questions and to guide you through the rest of the evaluation process, which usually requires recent MRI images and an MRI report.

https://secureform.rmiclinic.com/forms/13299/3207/VVp7/form.html


*AlphaGEMS tissue is procured from contracted hospitals after normal, healthy births

Study on Compensated Rotator Cuff Tear Arthropathy by Orthopedic Surgeon and Stem Cell Specialist, Wade McKenna, DO Published in Techniques in Shoulder and Elbow Surgery

Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas (PRWEB) November 08, 2015

A Study by orthopedic surgeon and stem cell specialist, Dr. Wade McKenna of the Riordan-McKenna Institute entitled, “Outpatient Treatment of Compensated Cuff Arthropathy Using Inlay Arthroplasty With Subscapularis Preservation” is published in the December edition of Techniques in Shoulder and Elbow Surgery.

Picture of Dr. Wade McKenna

Dr. McKenna

Dr. McKenna is co-founder and chief medical officer of the Riordan-McKenna Institute of Regenerative Orthopedics (RMI) in Southlake, Texas. Co-author of this work is Troy Chandler, PA-C from North Central Texas Orthopedics in Decatur, Texas.

Rotator cuff tear arthropathy sometimes develops in patients who have had a very large, long-standing rotator cuff injury. In CTA, changes in the shoulder due to the rotator cuff tear cause arthritis and lead to destruction of joint cartilage.

The Shoulder HemiCAP® restoration procedure is designed to match the shape and contour of individual patient’s cartilage and joint surface and be an ideal alternative to shoulder replacement. It simply recreates a smooth surface where the cartilage has worn away — similar to a filling for a tooth cavity.

The study examined a consecutive series of 50 CTA patients treated by Dr. McKenna from 2007 to 2015. It concluded that resurfacing the humeral head (shoulder bone) using a HemiCAP shoulder implant preserves the joint and avoids bone loss and complications associated with more invasive procedures like stemmed arthroplasty or total shoulder replacement.

Furthermore, the HemiCAP procedure disrupts the degenerative cycle of early-stage CTA, effectively addresses causes of pain, and avoids further muscle imbalance. The latter is achieved by a special deltoid muscle-splitting approach that leaves the tendon under the shoulder bone intact.

All of these advantages resulted in accelerated recovery and rehabilitation for patients.

“We are very pleased with the positive outcome of this study. Although we specialize in non-surgical stem cell interventions at RMI, sometimes, as in the case of CTA, surgical intervention is indicated. That’s why it’s important for patients to seek out an experienced orthopedic surgeon who, in addition to orthopedic expertise, is well versed on the latest advances in stem cell therapy. A surgeon needs both to know when stem cell therapy may be effective and when surgery, perhaps augmented with biologics like bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) and AlphaGEMS amniotic tissue product, is a better option,” commented Dr. McKenna.

About Riordan-McKenna Institute (RMI)

RMI specializes in non-surgical treatment of acute and chronic orthopedic conditions using *AlphaGEMS flowable amniotic tissue allograft and bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) that is harvested using the patented BioMAC bone marrow aspiration cannula. Common conditions treated include meniscal tears, ACL injuries, rotator cuff injuries, runner’s knee, tennis elbow, and joint pain due to degenerative conditions like osteoarthritis. RMI also uses AlphaPATCH amniotic membranes as part of a complete wound care treatment regimen.

RMI also augments orthopedic surgeries with BMAC and AlphaGEMS to promote better post-surgical outcomes.

BMAC contains a patient’s own mesenchymal stem cells (MSC,) hematopoietic stem cells (CD34+), growth factors and other progenitor cells. AlphaGEMS is composed of collagens and other structural proteins, which provide a biologic matrix that supports angiogenesis, tissue growth and new collagen during tissue regeneration and repair.

*AlphaGEMS and AlphaPATCH products are produced by Amniotic Therapies Inc. from donated amniotic tissue after normal healthy births. For more information about AlphaGEMS, please visit: http://www.rmiclinic.com/non-surgical-stem-cell-injections-joint-pain/stemnexa-protocol/

http://www.rmiclinic.com

801 E. Southlake Blvd.

Southlake, Texas

76092

Tel: (817) 776-8155

Toll Free: (877) 899-7836

Fax: (817) 776-8154

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2015/11/prweb13068117.htm

2015-11-09T20:59:07+00:00 November 9th, 2015|News, Riordan-McKenna Institute, Wade McKenna DO|

After FDA Approval, Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy Patient Receives First Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Treatment in the United States

Ryan Benton, a 28 year-old Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy patient from Wichita, Kansas, received his first umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment yesterday at Asthma and Allergy Specialists of Wichita, KS following US FDA approval of his doctor’s application for a single patient, investigational new drug (IND) for compassionate use.

Wichita, KS (PRWEB) September 10, 2014

Picture of Ryan Benton

Ryan Benton

Ryan Benton, a 28 year-old Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy patient from Wichita, Kansas, received his first umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment yesterday following US FDA approval of his doctor’s application for a single patient, investigational new drug (IND) for compassionate use.

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive form of muscular dystrophy that occurs primarily in boys. It is caused by an alteration (mutation) in a gene, called the DMD gene, which causes the muscles to stop producing the protein dystrophin. Individuals who have DMD experience progressive loss of muscle function and weakness, which begins in the lower limbs and leads to progressively worsening disability. Death usually occurs by age 25, typically from lung disorders. There is no known cure for DMD.

This trial, officially entitled “Allogeneic transplantation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSC) for a single male patient with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)” marks the first time the FDA has approved an investigational allogeneic stem cell treatment for Duchenne’s in the United States.

Ryan received his first intramuscular stem cell injections from allergy and immunology specialist, Van Strickland, M.D at Asthma and Allergy Specialists in Wichita, Kansas. He will receive 3 more treatments this week on consecutive days. Dr. Strickland will administer similar courses to Ryan every 6 months for a total of 3 years.

This is not the first time Ryan has undergone umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell therapy. Since 2009, Ryan has been traveling to the Stem Cell Institute in Panama for similar treatments. Encouraging results from these treatments prompted Dr. Strickland to seek out a way to treat Ryan in the United States.

The stem cell technology being utilized in this trial was developed by renowned stem cell scientist Neil H. Riordan, PhD. Dr. Riordan is the founder and president of the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama and Medistem Panama. Medistem Panama is providing cell harvesting and banking services for their US-based cGMP laboratory partner.

Funding for this trial is being provided by the Aidan Foundation, a non-profit organization founded by Dr. Riordan in 2004 to provide financial assistance for alternative therapies to people like Ryan.

About Van Strickland, MD

Dr. Strickland came to Wichita in 1979 from his fellowship at the National Jewish Hospital in Denver. Since then he has spent one year in Wyoming, one year in Dallas, Texas and one year in Lee’s Summit Missouri before returning to full-time practice in Wichita, Kansas.

Dr. Strickland has been a clinical faculty member at The University of Kansas School of Medicine in Wichita in the department of Pediatrics and later in the department of internal medicine for most of his years in Wichita.

Dr. Strickland is certified by the American Board of Allergy and Immunology and the American Board of Pediatrics. He graduated from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas and served a full residency in Pediatrics at Baylor and a fellowship in Allergy and Immunology in Denver at National Jewish. He has trained in allergy and immunology at the University of Texas School of Medicine in Galveston as an elective while at Baylor and was a student on the team with Mary Ann South, MD and John Montgomery, MD who put baby David in the Bubble (Bubble Boy).

Dr. Strickland is a fellow of The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, The American Association of Certified Allergists, The American Academy of Pediatrics, and The American College of Physicians. Dr Strickland has been recognized in the “Top Doctors in Wichita” listing several times.

Allergy & Asthma Consultants
MHV Strickland M.D.
10021 W. 21st St. Wichita, KS 67205

Phone: +1 (316) 722-4800
Toll-free: +1 (800) 347-4800
Fax: +1 (316) 722-5117

Web Site: http://www.stricklandallergy.com

About Neil Riordan, PhD

Neil Riordan PhD is the co-founder of the Riordan-McKenna Institute, a regenerative orthopedics clinic that will open its doors in Southlake, Texas in late 2014. RMI will offer non-surgical stem cell treatments and stem cell enhanced surgeries for orthopedic conditions. He is the founder and chairman of Medistem Panama, Inc., (MPI) a leading stem cell laboratory and research facility located in the Technology Park at the prestigious City of Knowledge in Panama City, Panama. Founded in 2007, MPI stands at the forefront of applied research on adult stem cells for several chronic diseases. MPI’s stem cell laboratory is ISO 9001 certified and fully licensed by the Panamanian Ministry of Health. Dr. Riordan is the founder of Stem Cell Institute (SCI) in Panama City, Panama (est. 2007).

Under the umbrella of MPI subsidiary Translational Biosciences, MPI and SCI are currently conducting seven IRB-approved clinical trials in Panama for autism, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis using human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells, mesenchymal trophic factors and stromal vascular fraction. Additional trials for spinal cord injury, and cerebral palsy are scheduled to commence in late 2014 upon IRB approval.

Dr. Riordan’s research team collaborates with a number of universities and institutions, including National Institutes of Health, Indiana University, University of California, San Diego, University of Utah, University of Western Ontario, and University of Nebraska.

Dr. Riordan has published over 60 scientific articles in international peer-reviewed journals and authored two book chapters on the use of non-controversial stem cells from placenta and umbilical cord. He is listed on more the 25 patent families, including 11 issued patents including a 2010 patent for a new cellular cancer vaccine.

In 2007, Dr. Riordan’s research team was the first to discover and document the existence of mesenchymal-like stem cells in menstrual blood. For this discovery, his team was honored with the “Medical Article of the Year Award” from Biomed Central.
Neil Riordan, PhD

Riordan-McKenna Institute
801 E. Southlake Bivd.
Southlake, TX 76092

Phone: +1 (817) 776-8155
Fax: +1 (817) 776-8154

Website: http://www.rmiclinic.com

Stem Cell Institute Public Seminar on Adult Stem Cell Therapy Clinical Trials in New York City May 17th, 2014

New York, NY (PRWEB) April 09, 2014

The Stem Cell Institute, located in Panama City, Panama, will present an informational umbilical cord stem cell therapy seminar on Saturday, May 17, 2014 in New York City at the New York Hilton Midtown from 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm.

Speakers include:

Neil Riordan PhD“Clinical Trials: Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Autism and Spinal Cord Injury”

Dr. Riordan is the founder of the Stem Cell Institute and Medistem Panama Inc.

Jorge Paz-Rodriguez MD“Stem Cell Therapy for Autoimmune Disease: MS, Rheumatoid Arthritis and Lupus”

Dr. Paz is the Medical Director at the Stem Cell Institute. He practiced internal medicine in the United States for over a decade before joining the Stem Cell Institute in Panama.

Light snacks will be served afterwards. Our speakers and stem cell therapy patients will also be on hand to share their personal experiences and answer questions.

Admission is free but space in limited and registration is required. For venue information and to register and reserve your tickets today, please visit: http://www.eventbrite.com/e/stem-cell-institute-seminar-tickets-11115112601 or call Cindy Cunningham, Patient Events Coordinator, at 1 (800) 980-7836.

About Stem Cell Institute Panama
Founded in 2007 on the principles of providing unbiased, scientifically sound treatment options; the Stem Cell Institute (SCI) has matured into the world’s leading adult stem cell therapy and research center. In close collaboration with universities and physicians world-wide, our comprehensive stem cell treatment protocols employ well-targeted combinations of autologous bone marrow stem cells, autologous adipose stem cells, and donor human umbilical cord stem cells to treat: multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, heart disease, and autoimmune diseases.

In partnership with Translational Biosciences, a subsidiary of Medistem Panama, SCI provides clinical services for ongoing clinical trials that are assessing safety and signs of efficacy for osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis using allogeneic umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSC), autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and hU-MSC-derived mesenchymal trophic factors (MTF). In 2014, Translation Biosciences expects to expand its clinical trial portfolio to include spinal cord injury, heart disease, autism and cerebral palsy.

To-date, SCI has treated over 2000 patients.

For more information on stem cell therapy:

Stem Cell Institute Website: http://www.cellmedicine.com

Stem Cell Institute
Via Israel & Calle 66
Plaza Pacific Office #2A
Panama City, Panama

About Medistem Panama Inc.
Since opening its doors in 2007, Medistem Panama Inc. has developed adult stem cell-based products from human umbilical cord tissue and blood, adipose (fat) tissue and bone marrow. Medistem operates an 8000 sq. ft. ISO 9001-certified laboratory in the prestigious City of Knowledge. The laboratory is fully licensed by the Panamanian Ministry of Health and features 3 class 10000 clean rooms, class 100 laminar flow hoods, and class 100 incubators.

Medistem Panama Inc.
Ciudad del Saber, Edif. 221 / Clayton
Panama, Rep. of Panama

Phone: +507 306-2601
Fax: +507 306-2601

About Translational Biosciences
A subsidiary of Medistem Panama Inc., Translational Biosciences was founded solely to conduct clinical trials using adult stem cells and adult stem cell-derived products.

Translational Biosciences webSite: http://www.translationalbiosciences.com

Email: trials(at)translationalbiosciences(dot)com

VIDEO – The Science of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine – Arnold Caplan PhD (Part 6)

In part 6, Prof. Caplan discusses Trophic properties of mesenchymal stem cells; MSCs for heart disease; MSCs homing to heart injury site and also to skin incision site; MSCs limit left ventricular thinning following infarction; Trophic properties of MSCs: anti-apoptotic, anti-fibrotic, anti-scarring, angiogenic, mitotic; phase 1 data for allogeneic MSCs show fewer arrhythmias, prompt heart rate recovery, and improved lung function; autologous adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction for treatment of chronic heart disease; Active mesenchymal stem cell clinical trials around the world; Induction therapy with autologous MSCs in kidney transplants; MSCs can coax neural stem cells to become oligodendrocytes, curing mice with MS using allogeneic human MSCs.

The dual effect of MSCs on tumour growth and tumour angiogenesis

Michelle Kéramidas, Florence de Fraipont, Anastassia Karageorgis, Anaïck Moisan, Virginie Persoons, Marie-Jeanne Richard, Jean-Luc Coll and Claire Rome

Abstract (provisional)
Introduction

Understanding the multiple biological functions played by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) as well as their development as therapeutics in regenerative medicine or in cancer treatment are major fields of research. Indeed, it has been established that hMSCs play a central role in the pathogenesis and progression of tumours, but their impact on tumour growth remains controversial.

Our results suggest that hMSCs injection decreased solid tumour growth in mice and modified tumour vasculature, which confirms hMSCs could be interesting to use for the treatment of pre-established tumours.

Methods

In this study, we investigated the influence of hMSCs on the growth of pre-established tumours. We engrafted nude mice with luciferase-positive mouse adenocarcinoma cells (TSA-Luc+) to obtain subcutaneous or lung tumours. When tumour presence was confirmed by non-invasive bioluminescence imaging, hMSCs were injected into the periphery of the SC tumours or delivered by systemic intravenous injection in mice bearing either SC tumours or lung metastasis.

Results

Regardless of the tumour model and mode of hMSC injection, hMSC administration was always associated with decreased tumour growth due to an inhibition of tumour cell proliferation, likely resulting from deep modifications of the tumour angiogenesis. Indeed, we established that although hMSCs can induce the formation of new blood vessels in a non-tumoural cellulose sponge model in mice, they do not modify the overall amount of haemoglobin delivered into the SC tumours or lung metastasis. We observed that these tumour vessels were reduced in number but were longer.

Conclusions

Our results suggest that hMSCs injection decreased solid tumour growth in mice and modified tumour vasculature, which confirms hMSCs could be interesting to use for the treatment of pre-established tumours.

Original Link: http://stemcellres.com/content/4/2/41/abstract

2013-04-30T18:17:29+00:00 April 30th, 2013|Cancer, Mesenchymal Stem Cells, News, Stem Cell Research|

Autologous bone marrow-derived cell therapy combined with physical therapy induces functional improvement in chronic spinal cord injury patients

Cell Transplant. 2013 Feb 26. [Epub ahead of print]

El-Kheir WA, Gabr H, Awad MR, Ghannam O, Barakat Y, Farghali HA, Maadawi ZM, Ewes I, Sabaawy HE.

Abstract

Spinal cord injuries (SCI) cause sensory loss and motor paralysis and are treated with physical therapy, but most patients fail to recover due to limited neural regeneration. Here we describe a strategy in which treatment with autologous adherent bone marrow cells is combined with physical therapy to improve motor and sensory functions in early-stage chronic SCI patients

In a phase I/II controlled single-blind clinical trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00816803), 70 chronic cervical and thoracic SCI patients with injury durations of at least 6 months were treated with either intrathecal injection(s) of autologous adherent bone marrow cells combined with physical therapy, or with physical therapy alone. Patients were evaluated with clinical examinations, electrophysiological somatosensory evoked potential, MRI imaging, and functional independence measurements.

Chronic cervical and thoracic SCI patients treated with autologous adherent bone marrow cells combined with physical therapy showed functional improvements over patients in the control group treated with physical therapy alone, and there were no cell therapy-related side effects. At 18 months posttreatment, 23 of the 50 cell therapy-treated cases (46 percent) showed sustained improvement using the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS). Compared to those patients with cervical injuries, a higher rate of functional improvement was achieved in thoracic SCI patients with shorter durations of injury and smaller cord lesions.

Therefore, when combined with physical therapy, autologous adherent bone marrow cell therapy appears to be a safe and promising therapy for patients with chronic spinal cord injuries. Randomized controlled multicenter trials are warranted.

Allogeneic and autogolous stem cell therapy combined with physical rehabilitation: A case report on a chronically injured man with quadriplegia

Allogeneic and autogolous stem cell therapy combined with physical rehabilitation - A case report on a chronically injured man with quadriplegia

Daniel Leonard in Panama

This is a research paper written by Rebecca Johnston, Daniel Leonard’s sister. She recently graduated from a Physical Therapy degree program, and wrote her Capstone paper about Daniel’s stem cell therapy treatment in Panama.

Daniel is presented anonymously in the paper, but Rebecca and Daniel have given their permission for this paper to be shared. Daniel’s ASIA scores (pre and post treatment) are in the appendix of this paper.

 

Allogeneic and autogolous stem cell therapy combined with physical rehabilitation: A case report on a chronically injured man with quadriplegia

Abstract:

Background and Purpose: Stem cell therapy for SCI is a potentially promising treatment with increasing interest. This case report describes the use of a particular stem cell therapy protocol for a patient with chronic spinal cord injury, and describes his subsequent therapy and outcomes.

Case Description: The patient is a 29-year-old male who is chronically injured from a cervical spinal injury, resulting in quadriplegia. The patient was treated with a combined protocol of intrathecal (IT) and intravaneous (IV) allogeneic MSC and CD34+ cells and IT autologous BMMC at 6 ½ years post-injury. The results track the patient’s physical therapy progress until 6 months following stem cell treatment.

Outcomes: Recovery of strength in upper extremity and lower extremity muscle groups was noted, along with a functional increase in grip strength, ability to ambulate with assistance, and a significant decrease in daily medications.
Discussion: This case supports further investigation into treatment of chronically injured SCI patients with stem cell therapy followed by physical therapy.

Manuscript word count: 4321

A few highlights:

“After the patient underwent the stem cell treatment and returned to outpatient physical therapy in his hometown clinic in the United States, his MMT scores were tested over the period of 5 months post-stem cell treatment…. The patient did not decrease in strength in any of the muscles tested, and experienced improvements in 6/13 upper extremity muscle groups, and 8/9 lower extremity muscle groups.”

“The patient also had an increase in grip strength. His grip strength was measured by his occupational therapist to be 5 lbs on the right and 25 lbs on the left at one month before his stem cell treatment. Six months later, his grip strength was measured to be 22 lbs on the right and 36 lbs on the left. The patient reported that this increase in grip strength led to functional improvements, such as being able to self-catheterize, which he was completely unable to do since his injury.”

“The patient was also able to ambulate for the first time in 5 years at approximately 4 months after finishing his treatment. He was able to ambulate in partial weight bearing with the harness and max assist of two for 40 yards at .5 MPH.”


The original post on Daniel Leonard’s blog can be found here.