Neil Riordan PhD on Peri-lymphatic Stem Cell Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

Stem Cell Pioneers featured Dr. Riordan in its February installment of “Ask the Doctor”, a monthly segment that features stem cell scientists and doctors answering questions from readers about stem cell therapy.

Over the next several days, we will share these questions and Dr. Riordan’s answers with our readers.

Question: I have heard from patients that you are doing intralymphatic stem cell injections. I think there are a lot of IntraLymph studies on other things like allergies, but none on stem cells that I can find. What is the reasoning behind this new route of administration? If stem cells get stuck in the lungs and we worry about that, why inject them directly into the lymph system where they would go to the spleen?

Dr. Riordan’s Answer: The goal of our treatments umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells for patients with multiple sclerosis really has nothing to do with repairing the damaged or destroyed myelin in the lesions found in the brain and spinal cord. Because multiple sclerosis is first and foremost an autoimmune disease our goal is to address the immune dysfunction. At the root of the disease is a pool of immune cells called T-cells, which actively proliferate, cross the blood brain barrier, and attack myelin. Our primary goal then is to interfere with myelin-specific T-cell reproduction (something called “clonal expansion’). Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown in multiple studies to have the capacity to block this so-called clonal expansion of activated T cells. In a way MSCs immunosuppress, but unlike some drugs that suppress the immune system this specific blocking of activated T cells does not quash the entire immune system—the cells and their secretions only block the clonal expansion. Other drugs that suppress the immune system—for example hydrocortisone—have an effect on the entire immune system, which can increase the risk of the recipient to infectious diseases and even some cancers.

If it were the goal of the treatment to induce remyelination then certainly the route of delivery would be of greatest importance. You would want for the cells (or whatever proposed remyelination agent) to be as close to the lesions requiring the repair as possible. So I understand the rationale for the question.

In my opinion it will be difficult to successfully treat multiple sclerosis by remyelination alone because if you do not address the immune problem you will continue to lose myelin. Therefore, getting the cells to the lesions for myelin repair is not particularly important. Further support for this opinion is that there is very good evidence that the body has the innate ability to regenerate myelin without intervention. There are two good examples of this. The first example comes from a condition called Guillain–Barré syndrome. The syndrome is an autoimmune disease that results from an immune attack on the myelin of peripheral nerves. There is an ascending paralysis and the condition can be life threatening if the paralysis gets high enough to affect breathing. It is treatable and generally temporary. In 80% of the patients the underlying nerves are not irreparably damaged and there will be no long-term neurologic symptoms. 20% experience permanent nerve damage because the axons of the nerves are damaged. The good news is that the disease is temporary. The better news is that in the mild cases in which the axons were not destroyed, complete remyelination occurs—the body has the capacity to restore myelin.

The second example comes from a phenomenon seen with serial MRI images of the brains in people with MS. Fifty percent of these low intensity lesions known as “black holes” revert within one month of appearance, indicating that remyelination has occurred spontaneously.

Further support for the “treat the immune system and not the Central Nervous System” in MS comes from the work of several groups, including Northwestern University who are using chemotherapeutic “conditioning”, ie. wiping out the immune system (and the by-standing hematopoietic stem cells) followed by bone marrow reconstitution using previously harvested bone marrow stem cells. There are published results of many cases improving without anything having been done to address the myelin loss.
To the question of intra-lymphatic injections: There has been no work on “intra-lymphatic” injections. We are looking into peri-lymphatic (near the lymph nodes) injections of huMSCs for patients who are refractory to intravenous treatment.
Here is a little background on this subject: Dr. Arnold Caplan of Case Western Reserve, the scientist to first describe mesenchymal stem cells, was in Panama last year consulting with us. He also presented at a conference that we cosponsored. In one of my discussions with Dr. Caplan he casually mentioned that whenever they injected mesenchymal stem cells into the abdominal cavity of animals that did not have an active inflammatory process in there in the cavity the MSC’s would automatically go to the abdominal lymph chains. They were able to determine this because they use cells that were labeled with the florescent probe. I found this very interesting given that the 70-80% of the immune cells of your body reside in the abdominal cavity in and around the intestines.

The rationale for peri-lymphatic treatment is relatively simple. Firstly, the goal of therapy in autoimmune disease is to induce immune tolerance in the face of immune intolerance. The majority of the immune cells are found in the lymphatic (which includes the lamina propria) system of the gut. MCSs will, when lacking a more compelling inflammatory signal, migrate to the lymph nodes. Once in the lymph nodes they will migrate and interact with the immune cells (T-cells and T-cell priming dendritic cells). We know for a fact that MSCs interfere with dendritic cell priming of T-cells.

My book will be coming out in April. It will go into greater detail on this subject and many more. There are case histories as well as treatment protocols and rationale for each condition. Information about how to get the book “Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Nature’s Pharmacy” will be on www.Riordanbooks.com, as well as on www.amazon.com.

Stem cell therapy for autism: Ken Kelley visits Amen clinic in New York

Ken Kelley visits the Amen Clinic in New York following umbilical cord-derived stem cell treatments at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama. Ken has shown remarkable improvements. See his before and after qEEGs.

http://www.cellmedicine.com/stem-cell-therapy-for-autism-amazing-qeeg-results-of-kenneth-kelley/

http://www.cellmedicine.com/stem-cell-treatments-for-autism-kenneth-kelley/

http://www.cellmedicine.com/kenneth-kelley-tv-news-story/

Panama’s First Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Clinical Trial for Rheumatoid Arthritis Approved by Comité Nacional de Bioética de la Investigación Institutional Review Board

Translational Biosciences Site Header
Panama City, Panama (PRWEB) January 14, 2014

Translational Biosciences, a subsidiary of Medistem Panama has received the county’s first clinical trial approval for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from the Comité Nacional de Bioética de la Investigación Institutional Review Board (IRB).

Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease in which the patient’s immune system generates cellular and antibody responses to various components of the joint such as type I collagen. As a result of this immune response, not only does joint destruction occur, but also other secondary complications such as pulmonary fibrosis, renal damage, and even heart damage. RA affects approximately 0.5-1% of the population in the United States.

Mesenchymal stem cells harvested from donated human umbilical cords after normal, healthy births possess anti-inflammatory and immune modulatory properties that may relieve RA symptoms. Because they are immune privileged, the recipient’s immune system does not reject them. These properties make MSC interesting candidates for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and other autoimmune disorders.

Each patient will receive five intravenous injections of umbilical cord stem cells over the course of 5 days. They will be assessed at 3 months and 12 month primarily for safety and secondarily for indications of efficacy.

The stem cell technology being utilized in this trial was developed by Neil Riordan, PhD, founder of Medistem Panama. The stem cells will be harvested and processed at Medistem Panama’s 8000 sq. ft. laboratory in the prestigious City of Knowledge. They will be administered at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama.

The Principle Investigator is Jorge Paz-Rodriguez, MD. Dr. Paz-Rodriguez also serves as the Medical Director at the Stem Cell Institute.

“While this is just the first step, it is our hope that Panama’s rapid emergence as a leader in applied stem cell research will lead to safe, effective treatments for debilitating diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and serve to benefit all Panamanians who suffer from it in the not-too-distant future,” said Ruben Berocal, M.D., National Secretary of Science, Technology and Innovation (SENACYT). “Oversight by the National Committee for Investigational Bioethics ensures patient safety by demanding ethical transparency and compliance with the highest levels of international standards,” he added.

For detailed information about this clinical trial visit http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. If you are a rheumatoid arthritis patient who has not responded to disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD) for at least 6 months you may qualify for this trial. Please email trials(at)translationalbiosciences(dot)com for more information about how to apply.

About Translational Biosciences

A subsidiary of Medistem Panama Inc., Translational Biosciences was founded solely to conduct clinical trials using adult stem cells and adult stem cell-derived products.

Translational Biosciences Web Site: http://www.translationalbiosciences.com

Email: trials(at)translationalbiosciences(dot)com

About Medistem Panama Inc.

Since opening its doors in 2007, Medistem Panama Inc. has developed adult stem cell-based products from human umbilical cord tissue and blood, adipose (fat) tissue and bone marrow. Medistem operates an 8000 sq. ft. ISO 9001-certified laboratory in the prestigious City of Knowledge. The laboratory is fully licensed by the Panamanian Ministry of Health and features 3 class 10000 clean rooms, class 100 laminar flow hoods, and class 100 incubators.

Medistem Panama Inc.
Ciudad del Saber, Edif. 221 / Clayton
Panama, Rep. of Panama

Phone: +507 306-2601
Fax: +507 306-2601

About Stem Cell Institute Panama

Founded in 2007 on the principles of providing unbiased, scientifically-sound treatment options, the Stem Cell Institute has matured into the world’s leading adult stem cell therapy and research center. In close collaboration with universities and physicians world-wide, our comprehensive stem cell treatment protocols employ well-targeted combinations of autologous bone marrow stem cells, autologous adipose stem cells, and donor human umbilical cord stem cells to treat: multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, heart disease, and autoimmune diseases. To-date, the Institute has treated over 2000 patients.

For more information on stem cell therapy:

Stem Cell Institute Website: http://www.cellmedicine.com

Stem Cell Institute
Via Israel & Calle 66
Plaza Pacific Office #2A
Panama City, Panama

Phone: +1 800 980-STEM (7836) (USA Toll-free) +1 954 636-3390 (from outside USA)
Fax: +1 866 775-3951 (USA Toll-free) +1 775 887-1194 (from outside USA)

Stem cell therapy for COPD

Email from a COPD patient on Jan 8 to Dr. Paz. We have removed this patient’s name since she has not yet informed her doctors in the US about her treatments in Panama. She received multiple intravenous injections of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells over the course of several days.

From: REDACTED
Subject: Re: Surveys
Date: January 8, 2014 at 7:48:49 AM EST
To: Jorge Paz Rodriguez

Dr. Paz,

I definitely feel there is an improvement from the 1st to the 2nd treatment. I feel much stronger and feel that I am able to function with a better quality of life. Prior to my 1st and 2nd treatments it was hard for me to keep up with the housekeeping, cooking, laundry and going out to the store for groceries was very hard for me to do. I have more energy to complete the task at hand now. I am able to walk longer distances without having to sit and rest and not getting as winded walking. Going up and down stairs is easier for me to do. I do feel I am making improvements with each treatment.

I have health insurance again and the Dr. here was wanting to do a physical with a chest X-ray to see the change in my COPD since my last X-ray a couple of years ago. I thought I could send you the X-ray on CD so you could compare the X-ray to what I originally sent you. I have not shared with the Dr.’s or anyone here about my treatments in Panama.

Please let me know about the Survey and if you think I should do the X-Ray and send it to you.

Thank you,

REDACTED

Sent from my iPad

2014-01-08T15:19:26+00:00January 8th, 2014|COPD, COPD, News, Patient Stories|

Stem cell therapy for traumatic brain injury – Oswaldo Tapanes

Oswaldo Tapanes received multiple injections of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells and his own bone marrow-derived stem cells over the course of a month both intrathecally (into the spinal fluid) and intravenously at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama. Here is what Mr. Tapanes had to day about his progress thus far:

My name is Oswaldo Tapanes. I have a traumatic brain injury; diagnosed in June 2005.

What symptoms did you have before stem cell therapy?

I couldn’t move my left arm. My vision was pretty bad. My speech is worse than it is now. I could only make sounds. My balance was very, very bad and that’s about it.

What improvements have you noticed since your stem cell treatments?

My speech is better. My eyesight is better. My arm coordination is better. My balance overall and better overall well-being.

How has this treatment changed your life?

It improved my quality of life, so much so that I’ve returned now for a second treatment.

What would you tell others who are considering this treatment?

I would say obviously, do your own research but from my point of view, it’s very safe. The medical science is explained. Everything is there on the web site if you look at it and do your homework. I wouldn’t hesitate coming. If I knew before, I would have came earlier.

Multiple sclerosis patient retires his walking stick after umbilical cord-derived stem cell therapy

From: mcgillron
Date: Wed, Nov 27, 2013 at 11:51 AM
Subject: Happy Thanksgiving!
To: edited_for_privacy@cellmedicine.com

Dr Barnett / Dr Hernandez & all staff at Clinic,

It’s a very special Thanksgiving for my household & I owe it to the efforts of all of you!

I’ve been walking without my stick since returning from stem cell therapy. 1 week of holding it for security & going on 3rd week of it riding in truck of my car. My stability is becoming more consistent & controlled. I am walking farther longer, riding bicycle more rhythmic & swimming smoother strokes.

Results are much greater than I expected. I believe the lifestyle changes, vitamin regimen, herbals, exercise & positive attitude adopted 14 months prior to visiting you allowed me to receive maximum benefit from the stem cell therapy.

I look forward to progressing my abilities back to a higher level over the next months.

If you would like me to share what I’ve done & am doing to get my results, feel free to give my email.

Dr Hernandez – please stay in contact on the herbal adjustments I’m making to solve final 2 deficiencies.

THANKS AGAIN for your hospitality & care!

Ron Mc Gill

Stem Cell Therapy for Relapsing-Remitting MS

Bonnie, who suffers from relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) received a combination of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells and adipose-derived cells administered daily over the course of 5 days.

Just wanted to send an update as I am really excited! I received my very first stem cells on 10/22/13, it has been less then a month and I am happy to report that I have tons more energy by balance is improving every day, I have no more foot drop and not even a healing I was looking for but I put my glasses on the other day only to find they made my vision blurry I didn’t need them, I am already saving for my next treatment! I can’t thank you all enough as I feel like I have a future with my 5 small children now, if you ever need someone to talk to future patients I would be happy to scream my praises! Looking forward to more and more improvement!

Sincerely,
Bonnie Barrington

For more information about MS clinical investigations at the Stem Cell Insitute: Stem Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis

Stem Cell Therapy for Autism – Ethan’s Journey

We received this message yesterday from Sean and Sarah Collins on Facebook regarding their son Ethan who suffered a mild traumatic brain injury and has symptoms of PDD-NOS and ADHD.

Hi all!

I wanted to update you on Ethan. He is doing fantastic! His cognitive flexibility has dramatically improved. We have reduced another medication and eliminated 2 major medications since we started last April. I have created a FB page if you want to check it out. Thank you so much for helping us get our little boy back!

Sean and Sarah Collins
Stem Cell Therapy for Autism Ethan’s Journey

PDD-NOS stands for Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified. Psychologists and psychiatrists sometimes use the term “pervasive developmental disorders” and “autism spectrum disorders” (ASD) interchangeably. …more information about PDD-NOS

Professor Arnold Caplan discusses mesenchymal stem cell therapy for multiple sclerosis

Professor Caplan is “The father of the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)”. In this clip, he describes a mouse experiment using human MSCs in a mouse model of MS. The experiment shows that it’s possible to place human cells in mice that have normal immune systems. He continues to discuss the astounding results.

Spinal cord injury patient demonstrates progress after treatment at Stem Cell Institute Panama

Watch towards the end to see Daniel demonstrate something his doctors told him he would never do.

Daniel W suffered a T-8 complete spinal cord injury about 6 years ago. Daniel is at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama undergoing comprehensive courses of stem cell therapy that include intrathecal and intravenous injections of his own bone marrow-derived stem cells and mesenchymal stem cells harvested from human umbilical cords donated by mothers after normal healthy births.

About Spinal Cord Injury Treatment

More Patient Stories

Disclaimer: The results of testimonials of people who appear on this website who have undergone stem cell treatment are not necessarily typical. The treatments described on cellmedicine.com are not approved by the US FDA and are not considered to be standard of care for any condition or disease.