Stem Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis – Jennifer’s Story on Treatment in Panama

Hi. My name is Jennifer and I’ve been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) since 2003. I started coming to the Stem Cell Institute last year, 2017, in January. My second treatment was in August of last year and now I am here for my third treatment [May 2018].

“I feel strongly that I wouldn’t be where I am here today. I would have been in a wheelchair.”

From my first treatment, I saw major improvements as far as being able to stand without wobbling or bouncing back and forth. I also can feel my toes. I also have more bladder control. The second treatment, I didn’t really see much improvement like I did the first. The first was major. But now I am here for my third and I’m trying to go within six to seven, eight months the most in between my treatments until I see, let’s say 70% improvement.

So, thank you and I support the Stem Cell Institute, and I feel strongly that I wouldn’t be where I am here today. I would have been in a wheelchair.

Video: Stem Cell Therapy in Panama with Dr. Riordan and Mel Gibson

Host Michael Beattie discusses stem cell therapy using *human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCT-MSCs)  at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama with renowned applied stem cell scientist and founder, Neil Riordan, Pa, PhD and acclaimed actor, director and producer Mel Gibson.

Dr. Riordan discusses the miraculous progress of a spinal cord injury patient and pilot whose doctors said that he would never walk again.  He talks about where the stem cells come from, how they work and why they can treat so many seemingly different conditions.  Dr. Riordan explains how umbilical cords, and subsequently, hUCT-MSCs used at the Stem Cell Institute are carefully selected using molecular screening.  He also discusses why mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cords function better than MSCs from adults, especially as they age or if they are suffering from a disease like multiple sclerosis.  For example. MSCs from a newborn multiply exponentially compared to MSCs from an older adult.

Mel Gibson discusses his father’s miraculous recovery, literally from his deathbed after receiving hUCT-MSCs at the age of 92.  He’s currently 99 and still going strong having been treated in Panama several times since then.  Mel also discusses his personal experiences in Panama.

Watch all this and more.

*umbilical cord tissue harvested after normal, healthy births

Stem Cell Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis

Image of Stem Cell Therapy Patient Marth Phillips

A Miracle for Martha
A woman’s journey of deliverance from pain

By Deanna Kirk Daily Sun Nov 26, 2017 (Link to original story)

The last 12 months have been a giant series of ups and downs, an extreme roller coaster for Martha Phillips.

Last December, her father-in-law battled brain cancer, which affected the lives of all of her close family; and her only brother died very suddenly from a pulmonary embolism. They were buried a week apart.

The battle with Multiple Sclerosis

Martha had been fighting her own battle against Multiple Sclerosis since a diagnosis in 2010. This disease causes the body’s immune system to attack its own tissues, and the malfunction destroys myelin, the fatty substance that coats and protects nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Phillips’ had seen her own ups and downs in that battle as well, with medications that caused huge weight gain, severe intolerance to heat, and intense bouts with pain. She tried many different protocols and medications, but what seemed to make the most difference was an extreme dietary change, which led to a loss of 72 pounds, acupuncture, adjustments, and regular massage therapy. Under the care of Dr. William “Doc” Davis in Ennis, she went from 10 prescriptions down to two, and did quite well for nearly six years.

But after the bout with all the stress during December 2016, Phillips discovered her body just could not cope with all the continuous stress demands placed upon it, and she suffered a pretty severe setback. She was forced to go on disability from her job.

“The Tysybri I was having infused regularly has a black box warning,” Phillips said. “I had to sign paperwork when I started taking it, that I knew it could kill me.”

The neurologist offered several other choices of medications, but all were either equally as risky with not as many good results, or more risky with even worse results.

“To me, it felt like my only choice was going backwards, and to me that was unacceptable,” she said.

Phillips learned about a somewhat-new innovative treatment for people with Multiple Sclerosis, and it was not being done in the United States yet, but for $25,000 one could fly to Panama City, Panama and have the complete treatment done and stay right in the same hotel where the treatments are done.

The blessings of how all her funding came together to have the treatment were chronicled in a story that ran in the July 8, 2017 edition of the Daily Sun.

But this story is about the trip itself, the treatment, and how her life has been since the trip to Panama.

Life since Panama, and new stem cells

It’s been roughly three months since Phillips returned from Panama. She took her little sister Robine Reeves with her, and the things she noticed right off were 1) the Atlanta airport is awful, and 2) Panama is a lot like Texas with regard to the weather.

“It’s very Americanized — they take American dollars, Spanish is their primary language but it’s OK if you don’t speak it,” Phillips said. “The people in Panama are so super friendly, even the kids. A group of junior high kids got on the bus with us and many of them spoke to us. That was the day Vice President Pence was there, and we, stupid Americans, didn’t know he was there, but his motorcade was very impressive.”

Phillips notice that the Panamanian president’s motorcade also came through that morning, and they watched it all from the rooftop of their hotel where the pool was. And some guy from London had to tell them their own Vice President was there.

“The clinic has a very impressive concierge,” she said. “Someone was there holding a sign with my name on it at the airport. She took us to the VIP lounge and whisked us through customs and the fingerprint deal very quickly and painlessly, and called our driver who works for the clinic. He took us to the hotel, and showed us shopping and restaurants along the way.

“They don’t have really good restaurants, they just look for consistency,” she said.

“The next day, I had a medical checkup and blood work. The second day, they gave me stem cells through an IV. I also had two subcutaneous injections in the groin/lymph region, which were more painful than the IV.”

Phillips also had physical therapy that day which consisted of evaluation, stretching exercises, balance and strength.

“The stems cells they use are umbilical cord stem cells, which women donate when they give birth,” she said. “Since they are brand new, they double every 24 hours. They’re a perfect source because they multiply so fast. I got 1.33 million stem cells.”

The way the stem cells work for MS and some other autoimmune diseases they’re using them for is that they reset the immune system, she said. They do not go in and repair the damage the MS has already done to her brain, but there is scientific evidence that shows if MS stops attacking the body, the body can heal the brain and spinal lesions.

“They believe that because there’s another virus that does the same kind of damage to your brain, but because it does not continue to attack the brain, people recover from it,” Phillips said.

There was another day of treatment just like the previous day, then the following day the sisters flew home. On the day of the blood work and checkup, the doctor discussed diet and supplements with Martha.

“He started describing a high fat, low carb diet, and I said, ‘Do you mean a keto diet?’ and he said ‘Yes,’” she said. “He said I would be throwing my $25,000 down the drain if I did NOT follow this diet and take supplements.”

Phillips had already followed this diet in the past, but wasn’t following it very strictly at the time.

Her supplement list looked something like this: 2000 mg per day of Magnesium; B vitamins; CoQ10; Stemkline; Probiotics; and a lot of it is supposed to be for energy as well as for brain health.

“When I went to Panama, I was taking 10 prescriptions,” she said. “I am taking one now, 90 days later.

“That all actually happened within the first two weeks.

“I feel amazing. I feel like I can conquer the world. I’ve had more energy than I’ve had the entire time I’ve had MS.”

Philips said when she made her trip to Panama, her thought was if she could get rid of enough of the pain and fatigue in order to return to work, she would be happy.

“But I got SO much more — I actually have no symptoms right now.”

She’s also no longer a slave to heat intolerance. Before, when she went to CrossFit, she had to wear a cooling vest full of ice packs and stand in front of a giant fan or A/C unit in order to work out. The least little bit of heat would cause her to become very, very sick.

“The first time I worked out after my transplant, Nick (Biles) came over to check on me, and I cried and said ‘I can’t remember the last time I worked out without heat intolerance,’” she said.

The heat intolerance makes the MS Symptoms you have temporarily worse until your body cools down. That can happen with one degree of change in body temperature, she said.

“It’s really weird to me now, to learn how to live without thinking about all those things,” Phillips said. “For so long, I’ve had to consider all sorts of eventualities in every scenario I find myself in.”

Dallas Morning News Features Stem Cell Institute Multiple Sclerosis Patient Judy Lecoq

Image of Stem Cell Therapy MS Patient Judy Lecoq

Judi Lecoq, 57, of Arlington, has been traveling to Panama once a year since 2010 for umbilical cord stem cell treatments to treat her multiple sclerosis — an option that’s not available in the U.S. Because the treatment is controversial and not FDA-approved, she must pay for the medical costs as well as travel. But Lecoq sees improvement with each treatment and says she’s doing much better than doctors originally predicted when she was diagnosed 20 years ago.

“When I come back, I feel a complete change in my energy level,” she says. “Before my last trip, it was hard to get anything done or to concentrate. My feet were numb; they’re not numb anymore.”

From – Ticket to Health: Do your homework before traveling for medical procedures

Read/download the entire chapter on stem cell therapy for multiple sclerosis from Dr. Riordan’s book

Image of Book Cover for Stem Cell Thearpy - Rising Tide

For more detailed information about our MS treatments, we welcome you to read/download the entire chapter on stem cell therapy for MS from Dr. Riordan’s new book, Stem Cell Therapy: A Rising Tide – How Stem Cells are Disrupting Medicine and Transforming Lives.  CLICK HERE (FREE PDF)

“Neil takes readers on a riveting journey through the past, present and future of stem cell therapy. His well-researched, educational and entertaining book could change your life. I highly recommend it.”Tony Robbins, NY Times #1 Bestselling Author

“100 years old will soon become the new 60. Stem cells are a key therapeutic to enable this future. Dr. Riordan’s book is your guide to why this is true and how you will benefit. A must read for anyone who cares about extending their healthy lifespan.”Peter H. Diamandis, MD; Founder, XPRIZE & Singularity University; Co-Founder, Human Longevity, Inc.; Author of NY Times Best Sellers Abundance and Bold

Stem Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis – Joyce Adair

Joyce discusses her progress after mesenchymal stem cell therapy at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama.

Interviewer: Today is July 28th, 2017. Can you give me your full name and diagnosis?

Joyce: Yes. My name is Joyce Adair and I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

Interviewer: So, this is your second treatment?

Joyce: Yes.

Interviewer: Could you tell me your experience after the first treatment?

Joyce: Well, after the first treatment last year in April of 2016, I noticed a big change in my energy. I was able to finally go out and do things with my family and friends that I had been unable to do for years. I noticed a change with my pain level. It didn’t go completely away but it did get better and I was able to cut back on some of my medications at that time.

Interviewer: And you also mentioned that you stopped using a wheelchair?

Joyce: Oh, yes. I wasn’t using the wheelchair. I was able to walk on my own – not using a cane or anything at that time. I could put full weight on my legs.

Interviewer: We just finished your second treatment. Can you mention if you have had any improvements this week?

Joyce: I’ve had a lot of improvement this week. When I came on Sunday, I was in terrible pain. I was even unsure if I should come or not because I was afraid to travel on the plane with the amount of pain that I was having in my right leg. But once I had my first treatment this week, I noticed a big change in my pain and I also have noticed a big change in my energy. I have a lot more energy and I can tell that it’s definitely getting better.

Interviewer: Thank you very much.

New Study Suggests Healthy Donor Stem Cells Better Than MS Patient’s Own Stem Cells

Pre-Existing Inflammatory Diseases Reduce Therapeutic Potential of Stem Cells for MS Treatment, Study Shows

BY ALICE MELÃO (Original Story from Multiple Sclerosis News Today)

Pre-existing inflammatory diseases affecting the central nervous system make mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) less effective in treating multiple sclerosis (MS), concludes a study by researchers at Cleveland’s Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine.

Diseases like EAE and MS diminish the therapeutic functionality of bone marrow MSCs, prompting re- evaluation about the ongoing use of autologous MSCs as a treatment for MS,” the team wrote, adding that its study supports the advancement of MSC therapy from donors rather than autologous MSC therapy to treat MS while raising “important concerns over the efficacy of using autologous bone marrow MSCs in clinical trials.

The study, “CNS disease diminishes the therapeutic functionality of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells,” notes that MSCs potentially produce several signaling proteins that can regulate immune system responses as well as help tissue regenerate. Preclinical studies have shown that this can reduce brain inflammation while improving neural repair in animal models of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). This model resembles the inflammation and neuronal damage seen in MS patients.

Given the need for effective new MS therapies, the results will help MSCs to advance to human clinical trials. So far, results have reported good safety data, though such therapies have failed to demonstrate therapeutic efficacy. Most such trials so far have used stem cells collected from the patient, a process known as autologous transplantation — yet this may explain why MSCs have not been effective. It’s possible that pre-existing neurological conditions may alter stem cells’ responsiveness as well as their therapeutic activity.

To see whether that is in fact the case, team members collected stem cells from the bone marrow of EAE mice. But these stem cells were unable to improve EAE symptoms, whereas stem cells collected from healthy mice retained all their therapeutic potential and improved EAE symptoms.

A more detailed analysis showed that the MSCs derived from EAE animals had different features than their healthy counterparts.

In addition, the team confirmed that MSCs collected from MS patients were also less effective in treating EAE animals, compared to MSCs from healthy controls. Indeed, these MSCs from patients produced pro-inflammatory signals instead of the protective anti-inflammatory ones.

“Diseases like EAE and MS diminish the therapeutic functionality of bone marrow MSCs, prompting re- evaluation about the ongoing use of autologous MSCs as a treatment for MS,” the team wrote, adding that its study supports the advancement of MSC therapy from donors rather than autologous MSC therapy to treat MS while raising “important concerns over the efficacy of using autologous bone marrow MSCs in clinical trials.”

Sam Harrell at Texas State House Public Hearing on Stem Cell Therapy HB810

Multiple Sclerosis patient and stem cell therapy recipient, Sam Harrell, speaks before the Texas State House Public Health Committee about how stem cell therapy at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama improved his life.

Sam’s testimony:

Chairman my name is Sam Harrell. I’m from Ennis Texas. I represent myself and I’m here in favor of House Bill 810. I’m just a football coach. That’s all I’ve ever been. There’s nothing easy about that but it’s all I’ve ever wanted to do, and I love what I do, and I’m doing what I love. I feel like the luckiest guy in the world. But I’d done that all my life and I was head coach in Ennis Texas, and everything was going great, and I had all these big plans and dreams, and in 2005 I was diagnosed with MS. At first it didn’t show up much so my wife and I didn’t tell a lot of people, but from 2005 to 2009 I’d gone where you couldn’t even notice anything to coaching out of a golf cart. Couldn’t stand up, couldn’t walk on my own, so in 2009 I had to retire from coaching, and in 2010 I had to retire completely from education, not because I wanted to, but because of MS.

During that time I was going to see the best guys, and they’re great guys in Dallas, and their heart’s in the right place, and they had me on MS meds and obviously not much was helping. That’s what they tell you about the meds. They won’t get you better. They just hope to slow it down.

Well, from 2005 to 2009, I went from coaching and walking and working out in the sun to not being able to walk and sit at home using a walker every day, so that slow down process wasn’t very slow in my mind. A friend of mine told me about Preston Walker, who went down to Central America for stem cells. Fortunately, in 2010, I found myself in Panama getting stem cells, and I fast-forwarded to 2014. I was doing so well again that I said, “I think I could coach again.” And I started again at Fort Worth Christian high school, and I’ve being doing that for the last three years. I get up every day, throw on my shorts and my tennis shoes and move again, and I never dreamed I’d do that. And it’s all because of adult stem cells in Panama. And that’s why I’m for this bill, house bill 810. I appreciate your time so much.

Stem Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis – Wes Meadlock

Transcription from Telephone Interview with MS stem cell patient, Wes Meadlock.

I’ll start from the beginning and tell you what I know.

In 2011, I started feeling something was wrong, and went to a neurologist here in town, went to his MRIs, and all his little testing, and this and that, and he said, “You’ve either got Lyme’s disease or MS.” The reason they said Lyme disease is because we have a place deep in the woods, and we stay there a lot on the weekends for a couple of years, and I got a lot of tick bites. We went through the whole thing of MS or Lyme’s disease, so I was thinking, maybe that’s what I got?

I’m not quite normal but I’m pretty close, at 80-85% of being normal. …but compared to some other people I know who have MS that I’ve done some aquatic classes with, I am far superior to them. I really believe this stuff works.

In the meantime, my father’s wife has had cancer pretty bad a couple of times, and he knows a lot of people at U. of Alabama at Birmingham; a really good hospital. He said, “I know somebody up here who’s really good with MS, why don’t you come up here and have him test you.” So, I went up there in the fall of 2012 and he did his testing, and he was telling me, “You have MS.” He said he could get me into some clinical trials, and I was thinking, “I don’t like pharmaceutical drugs.” I said, “If I could find something else, some other way, I’m going to try it.” I’ve been doing a lot of Internet research and talked to a few other people who said you should try some stem cells, so I did that. I went to Panama the first time. I did the liposuction, and they tried to get 90 million cells from me, and they could only get 45 million. I’m rather thin and wasn’t in too good a health at the time. They said, “We’ll mix it with some umbilical cord to get you the 90 million, so you’ll get 45 of your own and 45 of umbilical, and I think that was a two week ordeal to get that treatment.

I came back home and was feeling so much better. At that particular point I was having a problem walking with my left leg not cooperating, so when I came back from there, I felt like I’d gotten a good bit better. So, I decided to go back the following year. 2013 was the first time I went, and in 2014 they said, “Do you want to do umbilical?” I said no I do not, so they said they’d try something else. It turned out to be the umbilical cord cells, and when I got done a doctor told me, “You should be good for three years.” That’s where I am now, and I decided in the last few months that I need to go back again. When I called they said they had an opening on March the 13th and I said, “Okay, I’ll take it.” I just felt like, basically I don’t do any other drug, and I do believe it helps. The only one I do now is Naltrexone. It’s a 4.5mg dose of that and it sure helps my coordination and my walking. I’m not quite normal but I’m pretty close, at 80-85% of being normal. That’s about where I am now.

I’m not 100% but compared to some other people I know who have MS that I’ve done some aquatic classes with, I am far superior to them. I really believe this stuff works.

When I went back the second time, I’ve noticed a lot of difference there, I’m a full believer that stuff pulled from your own fat, and I’m 62 years old, can’t be as good as umbilical cord stuff and the way they process it. When I first started this they did nothing like it in the states, but they’re doing the liposuction stuff now. I went to a doctor close by here and told him my story, and he was trying to sell his products so he was against my story, but I said, “You need to do a little more research, because what you’re saying isn’t true. I’m a true testament.”

After I talked to him and he fed me a big line of BS, and I said, “You don’t even know what you’re talking about. You do in a sense and you’re trying to sell your product, I understand that, but you’re not hitting the whole base, that’s for sure.”

Stem Cell Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis – Jason Upshaw with Neil Riordan, PhD

MS Patient, Jason Upshaw and his wife, Michelle discuss his stem cell treatments at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama with founder and chief scientist, Neil Riordan, PhD. Jason was diagnosed with MS 21 years ago.

Transcript:

Jason: The very first time I came it was relapsing/remitting, and it progressed to secondary progressive, and that was the second trip that we came. I haven’t actually felt this good in years. I have no MS symptoms whatsoever, other than a bit of heat fatigue, still, but other than that, no numbness; no tingling; and I haven’t felt this good in years.

Jason: When I went the first time, it was to Costa Rica at y’all’s clinic and they had to put me on the plane in a wheelchair, and they had to transfer me between flights in a wheel chair. I couldn’t walk from here to the door without being exhausted and I still had a lot of numbness and tingling. When I got home from that trip I walked off the plane, got my own luggage, and walked out to the parking lot to the car that was waiting for us. It improved my life in one treatment.

Jason: Um, of course the numbness and tingling gradually went away, I haven’t had any numbness or tingling in years. The fatigue has gotten a lot better. A lot of it, if I’m smart, I don’t have any symptoms. I know my limits and if I push them too far… but I don’t think it’s just the MS. When you get tired, your body shuts down. I don’t blame a lot of it on MS. It’s just that when I get started, I just like to go, go, go, go. If I push it too far, I pay for it, but if I’m smart, I don’t go too far.

Dr. Riordan: You first came in August of 2008. When did you come a second time, in 2010? So, you felt the need to come back in 2010, so what were the symptoms like then?

Jason: The numbness and tingling wasn’t an issue. I could tell that I was dealing with more fatigue than I had been, so before I got down to where I was [before], I wanted to get a head start on it, so I came back. The heat was really bothering me then. My gait when I was walking… people could tell I wasn’t doing as well anymore. So before I got to rock bottom, to where I was before, I went to Costa Rica, I thought I’d get back down here and try to get ahead of the curve, and I’ve been going back ever since.

Jason: Yeah. I live in Texas so it’s going to be hot, but I think because of my medical history I have to pay closer attention than most, but for anyone if you stay out in the heat too long, you’re going to get drained. You’re going to get tired. It affects me more so than somebody without MS, but like I said, if I’m smart now and listen to my body, I really don’t have any problems.

Michelle: I’ve been with Jason through every step in this and with all his physicians in the states, and I would send anybody here. It’s extremely loving first of all, extremely hands-on in trying to help you.

Even if you need a glass of water, it’s not a bother, just little things like that. Extremely professional, wanting to make sure you go that extra step and know what you’re dealing with, that you’re not afraid of what you’re fixing to do. Being on the opposite end of this and not being the one who’s being treated you feel helpless, but here I haven’t felt helpless with anything Jason’s needed to go through. Everybody’s been so reassuring and reaffirming, and there’s been no questions. And if there are questions, they get answered. It’s a night and day difference. We’re not just a number, or a name, or the money being paid to make this happen. It’s truly being done because y’all care and it works! It just truly works, and I’d send anyone here in a heartbeat. The therapy of it, the physical therapy, it’s not you just go and exercise. You’re taught life skill exercise you can use until you’re 100 years old if you live that long, and continue to be stronger and better.

Jason: I’d like to qualify this: in the US I’ve had some of the best MS specialists that there are, who are still good friends of mine, but… it’s… my experience with MS in the United States is that they treat the symptoms and don’t look for a cure. I’ve been on every MS medication that there is, the last time I checked, and honestly the side effects were worse than what they were trying to fix, a lot of it. They weren’t doing anything. They said that the goal of each one of those was to lengthen the amount of time between relapses, which means you’re still going to have a relapse.

When we came here, I want to fix the problem. That’s what we found here. I speak to people with MS on a daily basis. I could make a full time job out of answering emails and phone calls about what stem cells have done for me, and I spend a great deal of time doing that. I don’t endorse the clinic, I don’t get paid a penny for doing it, but to me that would be the most selfish thing in the world to know it works if I didn’t take the time to share my story with other MS patients.

Y’all have changed my life. I’m back. I’m still in law enforcement. I work a 40 hour week that seems like a vacation. I’m not a proud man. The day my boss gave me my badge and gun back I cried like a baby because that was really the only thing that I’d ever given up on. I don’t give up. I never thought, ‘I won’t walk again,’ even when specialists told me, ‘Jason you might not walk again,’ because all that would do is make me more mad and more determined. The only thing that I nearly gave up on was never being able to wear a badge and gun again, and you guys gave me that back.

Every day when I take that first step it actually means something. It’s not I have to go to work tomorrow. I get to go to work tomorrow. It changes your whole thinking. She was talking about the staff. I get to tell people every time I talk to them that this is the finest group of doctors I ever dealt with. I’ve had some outstanding doctors in the US, but as far as… I’ll put the doctors here up against anyone in the world. The caring, the professionalism, if you have a question, they have an answer, and it’s… speaking from experience when I went to Costa Rica I was scared to death. I tried everything for my MS and nothing was working. I decide one day I’ve tried it all. I’d read about the clinic from another law enforcement officer who’d kept a blog about every day he spent in Costa Rica, which I followed religiously. I sent my application before he even got back and was approved. I met Preston Walker, the day after he got back was the day before I was supposed to leave. It was wonderful meeting him; if someone told you he had MS you wouldn’t know it to look at him, and he had the same results I did, and he’s still working today. But it was scary. I’m a country boy, I was raised on a farm, and for me to get on a plane to another country to get medical care down there… we all hear the horror stories. But after my first visit with the doctors I was at ease and it’s the finest group of doctors I’ve ever been associated with.

Michelle: And we’ve heard that from everybody. We have a group of people from every time we were here. I keep a group of people and stay in contact, and everybody is happy. Everybody who is dealing with children who have patients here to adults… we tell everyone when we were coming here that we were going on a family reunion because that’s just how we feel. This is like a family for us. Y’all have loved us and stood there with us through the hardest times and helped us have our life back and to us, that’s family.

Jason: We sat in our driveway and cried the day I sold my electric scooter because that was the only way I could get around. We sold it and when the gentleman come picked it up, we sat in our driveway and cried. It was so good to see that go, it was a godsend when I needed it, but it was so good seeing that go.

I’ll stand on top of the highest mountain and sing your praises to anyone that will listen, because like I said, it would be the most selfish thing in the world if I didn’t. I don’t just think it works, I’m walking proof that it works. I’ve talked to hundreds of people who have ended up coming down here, and I won’t say that everyone’s had the same results that I’ve had, but I can only think of two out of hundreds who just flat-out said it didn’t work.

That was my whole philosophy when I came down, I was so scared of getting my hopes up. I saw it worked for Preston Walker, but I’d been giving every witch potion you can think of saying this is going to make it all better. Medicine or herbal it didn’t matter. All I could see it was draining my checking account and not helping me at all. Of the hundreds I’ve talked to, with all but two, have said they were much better when they got back. I told myself if I had a better quality of life when I got home, then it worked. I don’t care how big or how small, if I had a better quality of life then it worked, and boy did it.

Michelle: If it didn’t work we wouldn’t be coming back for maintenance. If I can advise a spouse that is wanting to help in any way, this is not a miracle cure. This is something like with anything you do to change your life and make that commitment. This is going to give you the tools and everything you need and it’s going to jumpstart you to such a level – that you have that will and desire to go again that it’s given him. It’s your responsibility when you’re given that gift, You have to take care of it. You have to maintain it and nurture it. I think that’s why Jason’s been so successful; coming in with his mind-frame, when he got that gift with the stem cells. He’s taken it and he’s taking care of that gift and has nurtured it and that’s why we keep coming back; to boost it and keep it going.

Jason: When I was coming back I told my Sheriff, my boss, that I was coming back, and he’s seen me at my worst and my best because I’ve been working for the same place for seventeen years. When I told him I was coming back down, he got a very concerned look at first like, ‘are you not doing okay?’ and I laughed. It’s the joke around the office that I haven’t felt this good in years. I’m going down for a tune-up, and they all got a good laugh out of that. That’s how I see it. I’m getting a tune-up and I’ll keep coming down for it as long as you’ll have me.

Michelle: When I say I love you guys, and I haven’t met y’all, it’s because you’ve meant so much to me. I married this man not-healthy, walking with the assistance of a cane or a walker. I was the one who got to pick him up at the airport that day, and watch him walk upright like the strong man that he is for the very first time and it was wonderful. So that was the most wonderful thing anybody can have. So I’ve loved y’all since that moment.

Neil Riordan, PhD discusses stem cell therapy on Larry North’s “Better you Show” – CBS KRLD 1080am

Picture of Larry North

Larry North

KRLD 1080

Larry North has been helping people become healthy for over 25 years. He’s done this with three best-selling books, seminars, and gyms. These people were no different than you. The only difference is that they chose to make a change in their life. Now it’s your turn. Don’t put it off any longer. Let Larry help you become an even better you. Here’s Larry North.

Larry: Hey everyone. We had a cold front. It went from 105 degrees down to 97. It was really like a cool breeze for everyone in North Texas. This is the Better You show. I’m just thrilled! I’m always seeking to help you in my quest to deliver the best experts, the best guests, the best technology, the best medical advice that you could possibly get; be it exercise or nutrition, and of course your health. My guest is Dr. Neil Riordan, chairman of MedStem out of Panama. There’s so much to talk about. He’s published dozens and dozens of scientific articles, [and] internally peer reviewed journals. He’s just a cutting edge expert when it comes to stem cells. In fact, he and his colleagues have published articles together on MS, spinal cord injuries, heart failure, arthritis, autism. He’s also CEO of Riordan-McKenna Institute right here in Southlake. So he’s local, but he’s actually more international that he is local. Just happens to be close by, consults with numerous universities, and I consider him a friend. You flew in from Wichita, which is where you’re from, right?

Image of Neil Riordan, PA, PhD

Neil Riordan, PA, PhD

NR: Yeah, that’s my hometown. We were doing a fund raiser for a young man who has Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy, and originally we started treating him in Panama using stem cells from umbilical cords, and he responded very well, and he responds each time he gets treated, but we have to keep treating him. It’s a very long-term treatment. He has to get new cells every 4-6 months. He is the first person in the US to get umbilical cord stem cells for any indication, and we’re under the FDA. They’ve given us an investigational new drug, compassionate use, because he was treated seven times out of the country, but they gave us the green light for him to get treated in the country. He’s been treated now three years, every four months now, and when he gets those stem cells his breathing goes up, everything improves. In fact, now, eight years later since his first treatment, he’s in better health now than he was at 22, and he’s about 30 and a half.

Larry: I’ve been around you long enough and I’ve heard these types of stories, I really hope we can inspire a lot of our listeners. I’d like to start from the beginning. Your father was really kind of a holistic pioneer when it came to better health, was he not?

NR: Absolutely. My father and later myself, we did a lot of work on cancer therapy, and what we worked most on was intravenous vitamin C for cancer treatment, decades ago, back when that was really quackery. Now we have universities like Thomas Jefferson starting their third clinical trial using intravenous vitamin C for cancer patients, university of Iowa, even Johns Hopkins has started a study. Some of these ideas take time to catch on, but they’re really catching on now.

Larry: What was it like growing up with a father so cutting edge, so way ahead of his time?

NR: I think in retrospect now I realize how brave he was in doing the things he was doing. As my brother says, you can recognize a pioneer by the arrows in his back. He certainly had a few, but I think his legacy is that those arrows were unwarranted, and now you have major universities carrying on the research. The quality of life of cancer patients when they get intravenous vitamin C has improved. It’s been proven. More and more literature comes out, and he’s being vindicated.

Larry: What I’ve found, and this is why I’m so excited to have you, what I’ve found is that I know just enough about stem cells to really be dangerous when I try to educate people, and I don’t. Most people really have no clue. They’ve heard of stem cells. They think they know a little bit about it, but they’re really not sure. They’ll just be inquisitive. Where did all the stem cell research start?

NR: It actually started with one of our other research projects alongside the vitamin C research at the Riordan Clinic in Wichita, where we were looking at host non-toxic therapies for cancer. One of them…, there are cells in your body called dendritic cells. They are commanders of the immune system. They tell the immune system what to do, and in cancer patients they’re being blocked. One way to overcome that blockade to the immune system is by enhancing these dendritic cells and harvesting white blood cells to convert to dendritic cells. That was late 80s, and I left in the 90s to start my own clinic to actually make dendritic cells, to make cancer-therapeutic vaccines for cancer patients. I was in the Riordan Clinic for fourteen years, working on intravenous vitamin C and dendritic cell vaccines.

Larry: Interesting. What are the most common types of stem cells people have available to them today? I want to talk about that, and also, why umbilical? From what I’ve read, if you want stem cells that’s where you want to go, but I understand there are other options. You were able to treat this young man locally, but most people have to go out of the country. What were the early stages of stem cell options for people and where has it evolved to?

NR: First I want to exclude embryonic and fetal stem cells, which are subject to a lot of debate–religious and ethical–and we want to exclude that because that’s not even part of our conversation. It’s from an ethical and scientific standpoint that we’ve never utilized or even studied embryonic or fetal stem cells. We only use what’s classified as adult stem cells, and what’s included in that, is after a full-term healthy birth, we call those post-natal or adult stem cells. Once a healthy, normal life has begun on until your demise, those are all considered adult stem cells, and we can separate those into two major categories: one is blood-forming stem cells that are formed in your bone marrow, and those are called hematopoetic stem cells or blood-forming cells because that’s what they do. There’s a lot of confusion these days about those cells being used to treat cancer or MS, but those cells don’t really treat anything. When you hear about a cancer patient being treated with stem cells, they’re actually being treated with chemotherapy and/or radiation, in the hope that they get a high enough dose to kill the cancer, but it also kills your bone marrow’s ability to produce blood cells, so you die of an infection or you die of bleeding or something like that. The stem cells in that world are a rescue, not a treatment. Your stem cells are gone. They’ve all been obliterated, so you need new stem cells and start making all these blood products again. The world we’re in are repair stem cells -the repair stem cells are found throughout your body called MSCs. We use the term MSC for mesenchymal stem cells. We have them throughout our body and as we age, they become fewer in number, and as we age they lose their ability to fix things. They become less robust. So you have them in your fat, your bone marrow, every organ in your body. The healthiest, most robust stem cells from a non-dangerous, non-controversial source are from the umbilical cord. If we look at the potency of umbilical cord MSCs compared to mine, I’m 57 years old, my cells are going to divide once every 50-60 hours, whereas the umbilical cord cells divide every 24 hours, which doesn’t sound like a lot, until you look at the numbers. One cell after 30 days you’re going to have a billion cells from one if they divide every 24 hours. If you look at my cells in a lab, I’ll have a pitiful 2-300 cells after that period of time. It’s not just the cells, but it’s also what the cells secrete, molecules that stimulate regeneration. Our cells because we’re over the age of 50, they do not produce as many of those factors that stimulate regeneration, they’re also less robust their capacity to modulate the immune system and decrease inflammation. We all know that inflammation is the real key to aging.

Larry: You’ve touched on a lot of things. You are so brilliant and so smart. You’re a scientist. One of the great things about having you, is that this is the future of medicine, and being able to explain to people how they work. I want more stories from people who are actually, truly changing their lives as the result of stem cells, but I also want to talk to you about the confusions. I’ve had some friends who have gone to Houston and had some body fat taken out of their body, processed, and what are the benefits of that vs. umbilical? We’ll come back and talk about that. [Commercial break] We’re talking about the umbilical stem cells. Let’s say someone lives in Dallas. How would they know if they’re a candidate for stem cells?

NR: Typically we would want them to go to our website, and we’d want them to read all about what we do what we don’t do there. [www.cellmedicine.com]

Larry: So let’s say they go to the site, and one of my sponsors here is BioMedical and they’re about hormone optimization, and I love that your clinic actually does BioT. So if you’re thirty, and you test your testosterone levels and it’s high, let’s say above 800, they’d tell you you’re not a candidate for it. What tells you about who needs stem cells?

NR: We have a number of protocols. One of the things we do most of is we treat autoimmune diseases, and one of the indications we have is multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and others. The cells are very good when you infuse them in the vein. They change the auto-immune environment in the body. If someone wants to explore it as a treatment option, they’d go to the site and read about what we do and fill out an application. We have six MDs that work at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama. They review every case and will call them and typically ask them for medical records.

Larry: I’ve been there, to Panama, visited and got to work with your medical professionals, and I found it an amazing experience because for me, it was orthopedic because of the fact that I was a body-builder back in the 70s and 80s and we did things back then we probably shouldn’t have done. We sort of didn’t know any better. After being in several auto accidents, my neck, my back, my knee, and I have to tell you I had stem cells directly into the knee, and prior to meeting you I thought I was going to have to have surgery. In the month or so since we last saw each other, I don’t know what’s going on in my body but I’m feeling amazing. I want more of that! For me it was orthopedic. For others listening, you talked about inflammation, and stem cells are definitely able to help with that.

NR: Absolutely. They’re producers of the anti-inflammatory molecules in your body, the producers of your natural ibuprophen or naproxine. A lot of people, if they have a lot of arthritis, that’s another one of our protocols. Osteoarthritis, they don’t need to take those things anymore. We can inject right into the joint as well as do intravenous [injections]. The cells have this capacity to home to inflamed areas and respond to the situation to make the appropriate antibodies.

Larry: Let’s open up the phone lines. Let’s go to Said in Arlington:

Said: I am 60 years old and have been diagnosed with diabetes for six years. My A1C average is about 7-7.2. My question is, is there any research on diabetes and diabetic people? Will what you do help me?

NR: We don’t treat Type 2 diabetes in Panama, but there was a very good study done by the University of Miami, and they used bone marrow stem cells from the patient themselves, isolated the stem cells and pushed the stem cells into the pancreas, and if I remember correctly got a reduction in hemogloben A1C of 2.5 points was the mean for 20-some patients. I can post that study to my blog for you.

Said: Did that study proceed further?

NR: That was a one-time study and they followed the patients for a year. The procedure itself took one day, the bone marrow harvest, concentrating, and then the injection.

Said: What I have read, all these pharmaceutical companies are making money, tons of money, so naturally they don’t want anyone to promote to cure this disease. I’m sure there is a cure but no one wants to do the research.

Larry: Also, with Type 2, you do want to exercise, eat right, have your hormones in balance, take good care of yourself. That’s one of the best ways you can deal with your overall health and wellness, which you do control. Good luck to you. Neil, so, help me out here. Stem cells is a hot topic right now but you’ve been doing this for decades. You’ve devoted your life to it. I’ve seen and I’ve read on social media that locally, people are offering stem cells you can get locally. But really, without that special dispensation you have for one patient, what are people doing that are saying they can get it from a local clinic here.

NR: In our case at RMI in Southlake, we do stem cell therapy but we’re limited by FDA to using the patient’s own bone marrow. We also use amnion from afterbirth that has growth factors to make your bone marrow perform younger. We’ve got Dr. Wade McKenna, our board certified orthopedic surgeon. He does treatments using the patient’s own bone marrow in a relatively painless extraction procedure. He uses that in combination with amnion and with surgery. In his words, he likes to take big surgeries and make them small surgeries, and small surgeries and make them injections.

Larry: It’s a relatively new clinic but he’s busy, right?

NR: Yep, he’s done thousands of surgeries using bone marrow in Decatur and now he’s here, only for orthopedics, but we have another doctor there for overall wellness and optimization and hormone replacement therapies.

Larry: What led you to umbilical stem cells over other forms of stem cell treatment?

NR: It was mainly the science. One of the misconceptions is that the cells actually become new tissue. We have people come to us asking for new bladders and new body parts. These cells do not do that. These cells do home to places of inflammation in your body. That’s the sweet spot for these MSCs and they secrete substances that turn off these inflammations, and another sweet spot is autoimmune disease. If you look at what they secrete and their activity on the immune system and compare that to fat stem cells, you can get MSCs from your own fat, if you compare that, you have way more modulation potency from the umbilical cord than you do from your fat.

Larry: That’s quite significant.

NR: Basically you have to get this rock over a hill from an immune standpoint, and you can get halfway up the hill and it doesn’t do any good. If you want to get the rock over the hill, the best way to do it is with the best cells that produce the right molecules that stimulate your immune system to normalize.

Larry: The science agrees with you, there’s no question, but in the early stages, where did you go to get the cells in the first place?

NR: In Southlake, we have specialized equipment that allows us to take out the bone marrow, and we also have the amnion product that “hops up” the bone marrow. In Panama, we have a 16,000 square foot laboratory where we isolate the stem cells from umbilical cells, grow them out, freeze them down, and then we thaw them as required for use. All the hard work in Panama is in the laboratory because the actual therapy is nothing more, as you know.

Larry: Now, are there a lot of labs in the world that produce those types of cells?

NR: There’s about a handful. We’re creating a wedge with this Duchenne’s, and we’re creating a wedge for larger studies with more individuals.

Larry: Our callers touched upon it a little bit with pharma, I imagine there’s a lot of red tape and lobbying and I imagine pharma’s a lot of the pushback on why you’re not able to have your labs all over the United States.

NR: If you take rheumatoid arthritis as an example, and there was a study that came out where they treated over 172 people with umbilical MSCs, and all of them improved, after one infusion.

Larry: This is huge for those patients, because it’s very painful and there’s no cure before stem cells.

NR: If you look at the drugs that you hear about all the time watching television, you see these anti-rheumatic drugs over and over again, and they represent a 14 billion dollar industry in the US. So if you have a competitor that’s not yet FDA approved, there’s not going to be a great deal of pharma support for that.

Larry: Am I wrong in believe that the future is here, stem cells are going to be much bigger in peoples’ lives than they ever imagined?

NR: Yeah, I think it’s definitely right up there with vaccinations and antibiotics as far as the next leap forward in medicine, and as congressman Joe Barton pointed out in a meeting we had a couple of months ago, the truth always comes out. Sometimes it takes longer, and in this case the effectiveness of these cells, the safety of these cells, the naturalness of these cells, all those truths will become self evident at some point. How long it takes, I don’t know. There are other countries investing and building a regulatory process that will speed things up. For example, Japan has put in rules and regulations that will speed things up. Germany, South Korea, and Taiwan are right behind Japan. They’re going to allow for innovation like we’ve never seen before. If we don’t do something in this country, we’re going to be left in the dust. So, Japan’s rule basically states that once you prove the safety of your product, it can go to market for seven years, and in that seven years you can demonstrate what it’s effective for. I think we need something like that in this country if we’re going to stay competitive. There’s a bill being revised right now called the Renew Act. I don’t know that that’s going to make it, but we need something like it or for one of the states to create a statute much like medical marijuana, where the state of Colorado has said in spite of federal regulations we’re going to allow this and the attorney general’s going to back us up. I think Texas has a pretty good chance of that. I just got back from Kansas, and they’ve got a pretty good chance too.

Larry: Partly because of you! You’re at the forefront pushing and lobbying and really trying to create awareness.

NR: If you look at the economic benefit, I hate to use marijuana as a comparative, but if you look at the economics in Colorado, the state coffers are swollen with cash, and I think that would happen if a state were to say to the federal government, this is what we’re going to do. There’s enough evidence of safety, certainly with the patient’s own stem cells, with the post-natal stem cells, there’s enough safety data that one state will stand up, or the federal government’s going to have to make a break.

Larry: Any parting words?

NR: I think the best resource is www.cellmedicine.com and RMIclinic.com. It tells you everything we do and don’t do.