US FDA Green Lights Second Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy Patient To Receive Human Umbilical Cord Stem Cells In US

(PRWEB) MAY 26, 2016

Cell Dividing in SuspensionAfter several promising treatments in Panama using stem cell technology developed by Medistem Panama Inc. at the City of Knowledge in Panama, a 6 year-old Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy patient received his first umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the US earlier this year following FDA approval of a second application for a single patient, investigational new drug (IND) for compassionate use.

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive form of muscular dystrophy that occurs primarily in boys. It is caused by an alteration (mutation) in a gene, called the DMD gene, which causes the muscles to stop producing the protein dystrophin. Individuals who have DMD experience progressive loss of muscle function and weakness, which begins in the lower limbs and leads to progressively worsening disability. Death usually occurs by age 25, typically from lung disorders. There is no known cure for DMD.

This trial marks the second time the FDA has granted an investigational allogeneic stem cell IND for Duchenne’s in the United States.

Ryan Benton, the first DMD patient to be treated in the US with umbilical cord stem cells just celebrated his 30th birthday, a landmark age for any Duchenne’s patient. The FDA recently approved a request to increase Ryan’s treatments from two to three times per year. Since his treatments began in September 2014, Ryan’s condition has stabilized and there have not been any adverse side effects reported.

The new subject had traveled to the Stem Cell Institute in Panama several times for treatments similar to Ryan’s. Encouraging results and news of Ryan’s compassionate use trial prompted his parents to seek out a similar trial for him in the US, which was recently granted by the FDA.

Since 2007, The Stem Cell Institute has treated patients with human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells for autism, cerebral palsy, heart failure, multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and spinal cord injury.

In Panama, the institute is currently providing clinical services for Translational Biosciences’ Institutional Review Board-approved phase 1/2 clinical trials for autism, MS, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and spinal cord injury. It anticipates approvals for cerebral palsy and heart failure trials in the future. For more information about see: Translational Biosciences on ClinicalTrials.gov.

Renowned stem cell scientist Neil H. Riordan, PhD, developed the stem cell technology being utilized in this trial. Dr. Riordan is the founder and president of the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama, and Medistem Panama. Medistem Panama is providing cell harvesting and banking services for this trial.

The Aidan Foundation, a non-profit organization founded by Dr. Riordan in 2004 to provide financial assistance for researching unmet medical needs, is providing financial assistance for this trial.

About Stem Cell Institute Panama

Founded in 2007 on the principles of providing unbiased, scientifically sound treatment options; the Stem Cell Institute (SCI) has matured into the world’s leading adult stem cell therapy and research center. In close collaboration with universities and physicians world-wide, our comprehensive stem cell treatment protocols employ well-targeted combinations of autologous bone marrow stem cells and donor human umbilical cord stem cells to treat: autism, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, heart disease, and autoimmune diseases.

In partnership with Translational Biosciences, a subsidiary of Medistem Panama, SCI provides clinical services for ongoing clinical trials that are assessing safety and signs of efficacy for autism, multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and spinal cord injury using allogeneic umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSC) and hU-MSC-derived mesenchymal trophic factors (MTF). In the future, Translation Biosciences expects to expand its clinical trial portfolio to include heart disease and cerebral palsy.

For more information on stem cell therapy:

Stem Cell Institute Website: http://www.cellmedicine.com

Stem Cell Institute
Via Israel & Calle 66
Plaza Pacific Office #2A
Panama City, Panama

About Medistem Panama Inc.

Since opening its doors in 2007, Medistem Panama Inc. has developed adult stem cell-based products from human umbilical cord tissue and blood, adipose (fat) tissue and bone marrow. Medistem operates an 8000 sq. ft. ISO 9001-certified laboratory in the prestigious City of Knowledge. The laboratory is fully licensed by the Panamanian Ministry of Health and features 3 class 10000 clean rooms, class 100 laminar flow hoods, and class 100 incubators.

Medistem Panama Website: http://www.medistempanama.com

Medistem Panama Inc.
Ciudad del Saber, Edif. 221 / Clayton
Panama, Rep. of Panama
Phone: +507 306-2601
Fax: +507 306-2601

About Translational Biosciences

A subsidiary of Medistem Panama Inc., Translational Biosciences was founded solely to conduct clinical trials using adult stem cells and adult stem cell-derived products.

Translational Biosciences Web Site: http://www.translationalbiosciences.com

First Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy Patient To Receive Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Therapy In US Turns 30

The first patient with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy to be granted FDA approval for allogeneic adult stem cell therapy in the United States turned 30 this year, well surpassing his original life expectancy and paving the way for future patients, according to non-profit organization Coming Together For A Cure.

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patient and Stem Cell Recipient, Ryan Benton

Ryan Benton

WICHITA, KANSAS (PRWEB) MAY 18, 2016 – Ryan Benton was diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) at the age of three and given a life expectancy in the late teens to early twenties. DMD is a relatively common progressive genetic disorder, which causes aggressive deterioration of the muscles.

In 2009, at the age of 22, Benton’s condition was critical. He met with the founder of the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama and Medistem Panama, Neil H. Riordan, PhD. Research had shown that adult stem cell therapy might have the potential to reverse the progression of DMD.

Because of the laws restricting adult stem cell therapy in the United States, Benton was forced to travel to Panama to receive his first life-saving treatment. Ryan made seven trips to Panama to receive treatments from Dr. Riordan’s team of physicians at the Stem Cell Institute.

“Ryan has seen vast improvements in muscle mass and lung capacity as a result of his treatments…”

Ryan was assured at the start that there was no guarantee that we would find success but we knew it was his only hope in fighting the disease, especially since his health was at a critical point. Ryan could tell shortly after the first treatment that something was working. He found a renewed strength that he had never felt before and not once did he see any adverse side effects. He trusted Dr. Riordan and felt safe and eager to undergo additional treatments.

It took five years of hard work and successful treatments, but Benton became the first (and only) DMD patient granted FDA approval for this form of medical therapy inside the United States. An investigational new drug (IND) for compassionate use application was approved, allowing Benton to receive treatment in his hometown, Wichita, KS.

Approval from the FDA came with many stipulations, however. This form of treatment was to be used for only a single patient, twice a year for 3 years.

By all accounts, January 2016 was a major milestone. The FDA has recently granted an additional treatment per year, now allowing Ryan three total treatments per year, as well as approval for a second compassionate use IND for another patient. This second patient, a six-year-old boy, has also shown success from previous treatments in Panama. He received his first treatment in the United States this year .

Ryan and his family have been actively involved in the local muscular dystrophy community, and have personally known dozens of others with DMD who have passed away at far too young of an age. That number continues to grow each day, which only continues to frustrate Ryan and his family as they fight for this treatment to be more readily available for others suffering from the same disease. Ryan believes that if treated early enough, patients could have a strong chance to live a “normal” life. Ryan believes if he had been treated when he was six years old, it could be very likely that he would never have faced any of the diseases debilitating effects.

Ryan has seen vast improvements in muscle mass and lung capacity as a result of his treatments, but we believe additional treatments on a more frequent basis would help ensure maximum potential when it comes to reversing the progression of his disease. Immediately following each round of treatment, we see dramatic increases in his overall health, stamina, physical strength, and ease in ability to breathe. Unfortunately, we have found that on average, three to four months after each treatment, the effectiveness of the cells begins to decrease. We believe the FDA’s permission to increase the number of treatments per year will help safeguard Ryan’s ability to preserve his improvements and more effectively control his Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy. Video: Ryan Benton discusses stem cell therapy for DMD
For many families that have lived alongside, or suffered from this disease, this is very exciting news. Ryan and his family are continually heart stricken as they hear of another member of their md community has died far too young due to the disease. It’s their hope they can help provide other families the same opportunities that they were so fortunate to receive.

Coming Together for a Cure, (CTFAC) is a non-profit organization founded by Benton’s siblings, Lauren and Blake after Ryan’s first round of treatments in 2009. In the 7 years since the Bentons were given new hope, they’ve been hard at work raising awareness and support for adult stem cell research and therapy.

To find more information about their organization, their family, or to find out how you can help, please visit http://www.comingtogetherforacure.org

For all other inquiries, please email comingtogetherforacure(at)gmail(dot)com

Why Stem Cells Work: Clinical Trials for Spinal Cord Injury, Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy

Neil Riordan, PhD speaks at the Riordan-McKenna Institute and Stem Cell Institute fall seminar in Southlake, Texas on October 10, 2015.

Dr. Riordan discusses:

  • How our lab selects uses specialized screening techniques to select only the stem cells that we know will be the most useful for our patients. Only about 1 in 100 cords pass this screening process.
  • How umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) control inflammation, modulate the immune system and stimulate regeneration.
  • How the number and function of our own stem cells decline over time.
  • How MSC secretions promote healing
  • Where MSCs are found in our body
  • First clinic trial in the US using umbilical cord tissue-derived stem cells
  • How MSC doubling times dramatically decrease as people age, which is why cord cells are much more robust than a patient’s own cells as they age
  • The origin of Medistem Lab in Panama
  • Why the Stem Cell Institute and Medistem Labs are in Panama
  • Stem cell therapy laws and approvals around the world
  • Global interest in mesenchymal stem cell therapy research
  • Current clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells
  • Clinical trials in Panama
  • Collaborations with corporations and educational institutions
  • Mesenchymal stem cell selection, donor selection, and testing
  • Brief tour of Medistem Panama stem cell laboratory
  • Isolation and production of mesenchymal stem cells
  • Discovery of mesenchymal stem cells in menstrual blood
  • Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell studies for rheumatoid arthritis
  • The role of T-regulatory cells in rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis
  • Treating spinal cord injuries with mesenchymal stem cells
  • Mechanism of mesenchymal stem cells on spinal cord injury. They are not becoming tissue. It’s their secretions that allow the spinal cord to heal itself.
  • Umbilical cord MSC studies on spinal cord injury
  • Data from Stem Cell Institute spinal cord injury patients
  • Video from treated spinal cord injury patients
  • Postnatal MSC safety
  • MSCs and cancer risk – MSCs have been shows to actually inhibit tumor growth

After FDA Approval, Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy Patient Receives First Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Treatment in the United States

Ryan Benton, a 28 year-old Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy patient from Wichita, Kansas, received his first umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment yesterday at Asthma and Allergy Specialists of Wichita, KS following US FDA approval of his doctor’s application for a single patient, investigational new drug (IND) for compassionate use.

Wichita, KS (PRWEB) September 10, 2014

Picture of Ryan Benton

Ryan Benton

Ryan Benton, a 28 year-old Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy patient from Wichita, Kansas, received his first umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell treatment yesterday following US FDA approval of his doctor’s application for a single patient, investigational new drug (IND) for compassionate use.

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive form of muscular dystrophy that occurs primarily in boys. It is caused by an alteration (mutation) in a gene, called the DMD gene, which causes the muscles to stop producing the protein dystrophin. Individuals who have DMD experience progressive loss of muscle function and weakness, which begins in the lower limbs and leads to progressively worsening disability. Death usually occurs by age 25, typically from lung disorders. There is no known cure for DMD.

This trial, officially entitled “Allogeneic transplantation of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSC) for a single male patient with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)” marks the first time the FDA has approved an investigational allogeneic stem cell treatment for Duchenne’s in the United States.

Ryan received his first intramuscular stem cell injections from allergy and immunology specialist, Van Strickland, M.D at Asthma and Allergy Specialists in Wichita, Kansas. He will receive 3 more treatments this week on consecutive days. Dr. Strickland will administer similar courses to Ryan every 6 months for a total of 3 years.

This is not the first time Ryan has undergone umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell therapy. Since 2009, Ryan has been traveling to the Stem Cell Institute in Panama for similar treatments. Encouraging results from these treatments prompted Dr. Strickland to seek out a way to treat Ryan in the United States.

The stem cell technology being utilized in this trial was developed by renowned stem cell scientist Neil H. Riordan, PhD. Dr. Riordan is the founder and president of the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama and Medistem Panama. Medistem Panama is providing cell harvesting and banking services for their US-based cGMP laboratory partner.

Funding for this trial is being provided by the Aidan Foundation, a non-profit organization founded by Dr. Riordan in 2004 to provide financial assistance for alternative therapies to people like Ryan.

About Van Strickland, MD

Dr. Strickland came to Wichita in 1979 from his fellowship at the National Jewish Hospital in Denver. Since then he has spent one year in Wyoming, one year in Dallas, Texas and one year in Lee’s Summit Missouri before returning to full-time practice in Wichita, Kansas.

Dr. Strickland has been a clinical faculty member at The University of Kansas School of Medicine in Wichita in the department of Pediatrics and later in the department of internal medicine for most of his years in Wichita.

Dr. Strickland is certified by the American Board of Allergy and Immunology and the American Board of Pediatrics. He graduated from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas and served a full residency in Pediatrics at Baylor and a fellowship in Allergy and Immunology in Denver at National Jewish. He has trained in allergy and immunology at the University of Texas School of Medicine in Galveston as an elective while at Baylor and was a student on the team with Mary Ann South, MD and John Montgomery, MD who put baby David in the Bubble (Bubble Boy).

Dr. Strickland is a fellow of The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, The American Association of Certified Allergists, The American Academy of Pediatrics, and The American College of Physicians. Dr Strickland has been recognized in the “Top Doctors in Wichita” listing several times.

Allergy & Asthma Consultants
MHV Strickland M.D.
10021 W. 21st St. Wichita, KS 67205

Phone: +1 (316) 722-4800
Toll-free: +1 (800) 347-4800
Fax: +1 (316) 722-5117

Web Site: http://www.stricklandallergy.com

About Neil Riordan, PhD

Neil Riordan PhD is the co-founder of the Riordan-McKenna Institute, a regenerative orthopedics clinic that will open its doors in Southlake, Texas in late 2014. RMI will offer non-surgical stem cell treatments and stem cell enhanced surgeries for orthopedic conditions. He is the founder and chairman of Medistem Panama, Inc., (MPI) a leading stem cell laboratory and research facility located in the Technology Park at the prestigious City of Knowledge in Panama City, Panama. Founded in 2007, MPI stands at the forefront of applied research on adult stem cells for several chronic diseases. MPI’s stem cell laboratory is ISO 9001 certified and fully licensed by the Panamanian Ministry of Health. Dr. Riordan is the founder of Stem Cell Institute (SCI) in Panama City, Panama (est. 2007).

Under the umbrella of MPI subsidiary Translational Biosciences, MPI and SCI are currently conducting seven IRB-approved clinical trials in Panama for autism, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis using human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells, mesenchymal trophic factors and stromal vascular fraction. Additional trials for spinal cord injury, and cerebral palsy are scheduled to commence in late 2014 upon IRB approval.

Dr. Riordan’s research team collaborates with a number of universities and institutions, including National Institutes of Health, Indiana University, University of California, San Diego, University of Utah, University of Western Ontario, and University of Nebraska.

Dr. Riordan has published over 60 scientific articles in international peer-reviewed journals and authored two book chapters on the use of non-controversial stem cells from placenta and umbilical cord. He is listed on more the 25 patent families, including 11 issued patents including a 2010 patent for a new cellular cancer vaccine.

In 2007, Dr. Riordan’s research team was the first to discover and document the existence of mesenchymal-like stem cells in menstrual blood. For this discovery, his team was honored with the “Medical Article of the Year Award” from Biomed Central.
Neil Riordan, PhD

Riordan-McKenna Institute
801 E. Southlake Bivd.
Southlake, TX 76092

Phone: +1 (817) 776-8155
Fax: +1 (817) 776-8154

Website: http://www.rmiclinic.com

Fat Stem Cells Turn to Muscle: A Treatment for Muscular Dystrophy?

New research published in the journal Biomaterials by University of California, San Diego researcher Adam Engler suggests fat-derived stem cells that are developed on a stiff surface transform into mature muscle cells. This remarkable discovery could lead to new treatments for muscular dystrophy in the future.

Fat stem cells and bone marrow stem cells were grown on surfaces with different degrees of hardness ranging from very hard bone-like surfaces to very soft brain tissue-like surfaces.

The researchers found that the fat derived stem cells were much more likely (up to fifty times) to exhibit proteins that are essential to the cells becoming muscle tissue.
Yuk Suk Choi, a post-doc team member, says that the fat-derived stem cells seem to proliferate better than bone marrow cells when introduced to the hard surfaces. “They are actively feeling their environment soon, which allows them to interpret the signals from the interaction of cell and environment that guide development,” explained Choi.

Unlike bone marrow stem cells, stem cells from fat fused together to form myotubes. Although this phenomenon has been observed in the past, it has never been observed at such a high degree by Engler in the lab. Myotubes comprise an essential step in muscle formation.

Next, Engler and his team plan to observe how fused cells from fat perform in lab mice which are afflicted with a particular form of muscular dystrophy.

However, Dr. Engler cautioned, “From the perspective of translating this into a clinically viable therapy, we want to know what components of the environment provide the most important cues for these cells.”

2012-01-31T18:38:24+00:00January 31st, 2012|Adult Stem Cells, Muscular Dystrophy, News, Stem Cell Research|

Stem cells secrete factors that promote muscle growth after exercise

Stem cells that aid in healing disease and injury in skeletal muscle have been found inside muscles in greater numbers after exercise, according to a new animal study at the University of Illinois.

Just one exercise session increases the number of muscle-derived mesenchymal stem cells (mMSCs) in mice, according to Beckman Institute researcher Marni Boppart. Dr. Bopart is an assistant professor of kinesiology and community health at the University of Illinois.

mMSCs can differentiate (change) into many different cell types and are found throughout the body. For the first time, this study also showed that they also facilitate tissue healing indirectly.

Bopart said, “What we’ve been able to show in this paper and our current work is that mMSCs are not directly contributing to muscle growth, but do in fact secrete a variety of different factors that positively impact muscle growth.”

Bopart believes that these secreted factors, which specifically respond to mechanical strain are an important step toward treatments that can prevent muscle loss that occurs with aging.

This work was reported in the journal PlosOne.

2012-01-20T18:50:22+00:00January 20th, 2012|Adult Stem Cells, Muscular Dystrophy, News, Stem Cell Research|

Muscular Dystrophy Sufferers Hope New Treatment Can Answer Prayers

Adult stem cell therapy has been used for many diseases
including heart failure, liver failure, stroke, multiple sclerosis, and even
drug resistant tuberculosis. The biological basis for how stem cell therapy
works seems to be two-fold. On the one hand, the stem cells appear to have the
ability to become new tissues, on the other hand, the stem cells produce various
proteins that stimulate the body to heal itself. One condition for which stem
cell therapy may offer great hope is Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, a disease in
which muscle cells deteriorate due to the presence of a mutated gene (dystrophin)
whose protein produce is involved in muscle contraction.

Researchers from Cellmedicine in collaboration with
Medistem has previously published a case report in the peer-reviewed literature
demonstrating improvement in a Duchenne’s patient treated with mesenchymal stem
cells (Ichim et al. Mesenchymal stem cells as anti-inflammatories:
implications for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Cell Immunol.
2010;260(2):75-82
). The patient described in the paper, Ryan Benton, was
the subject of a previous news report which is available at

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jyt2LHayjcs
.

Today a news report was published describing follow-up on
Ryan Benton as well as another Duchenne’s patient Ian Conner that was treated
with stem cells by Cellmedicine.

Ryan and Ian have known each other all of their lives,
having watched their condition progressively deteriorate. Last year Ian’s
condition substantially worsened.

"At the time, I didn’t think I was going to live much
longer," Conner said. His mother Laurie Conner stated "Last year, I thought it
would be very soon that he would be dying. We needed to get ready, because he
was so sick, in bed a lot and he felt terrible." However there was a glimmer of
hope. Ian’s mother told him about the response Ryan had after receiving stem
cell therapy.

"We got a muscle biopsy back and it has produced dystrophin
and it’s producing normal amounts of dystrophin," Ryan said. He continued "The
main difference I’ve noticed I’ve gained a lot of weight I was down to 77
pounds."

The treatment appears to show greater effects the more
times the stem cells are injected. Both Ian and Ryan are hoping that stem cell
therapy for Duchenne’s will one day be approved in the United States so that
they do not have to travel outside of the country.

Dr.
Riordan has been in discussions with various organization and welcomes any input
on collaborations that can be used to accelerate implementation of this approach
through the Food and Drug Administration.

2010-05-04T17:43:17+00:00May 4th, 2010|Muscular Dystrophy, News, Stem Cell Research|