The Lip TV News: Neil Riordan, PhD on Exploring New Stem Cell Treatments for MS, Arthritis, Autism and More

Stem cell treatment and research towards curing illness–from multiple sclerosis to spinal injury–is detailed by Dr. Neil Riordan. The American medical industry, obstructions to research in the states, misconceptions about stem cells, and the details about the treatment process are explained–and we look at video of patient recovery and speculate at what the future could spell for stem cell treatment and research in this Lip News interview, hosted by Elliot Hill.

GUEST BIO:
Dr. Neil Riordan is the founder and Chairman of Medistem Panama, a leading stem cell laboratory and research facility – located in Panama City. His institute is at the forefront of research of the effects of adult stem cells on the course of several chronic diseases. Dr. Riordan has more than 60 scientific articles in international peer-reviewed journals. In the stem cell arena, he and his colleagues have published more than 20 articles on Multiple Sclerosis, Spinal Cord Injury, Heart Failure, Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Endometrial regenerative cells for treatment of heart failure: a new stem cell enters the clinic

Leo Bockeria, Vladimir Bogin, Olga Bockeria, Tatyana Le, Bagrat Alekyan, Erik J Woods, Amalia A Brown, Thomas E Ichim and Amit N Patel

Journal of Translational Medicine 2013, 11:56 doi:10.1186/1479-5876-11-56
Published: 5 March 2013

Heart failure is one of the key causes of morbidity and mortality world-wide. The recent findings that regeneration is possible in the heart have made stem cell therapeutics the Holy Grail of modern cardiovascular medicine. The success of cardiac regenerative therapies hinges on the combination of an effective allogeneic “off the shelf” cell product with a practical delivery system. In 2007 Medistem discovered the Endometrial Regenerative Cell (ERC), a new mesenchymal-like stem cell. Medistem and subsequently independent groups have demonstrated that ERC are superior to bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), the most widely used stem cell source in development. ERC possess robust expansion capability (one donor can generate 20,000 patients doses), key growth factor production and high levels of angiogenic activity. ERC have been published in the peer reviewed literature to be significantly more effect at treating animal models of heart failure (Hida et al. Stem Cells 2008).Current methods of delivering stem cells into the heart suffer several limitations in addition to poor delivery efficiency. Surgical methods are highly invasive, and the classical catheter based techniques are limited by need for sophisticated cardiac mapping systems and risk of myocardial perforation. Medistem together with Dr. Amit Patel Director of Clinical Regenerative Medicine at University of Utah have developed a novel minimally invasive delivery method that has been demonstrated safe and effective for delivery of stem cells (Tuma et al. J Transl Med 2012). Medistem is evaluating the combination of ERC, together with our retrograde delivery procedure in a 60 heart failure patient, double blind, placebo controlled phase II trial. To date 17 patients have been dosed and preliminary analysis by the Data Safety Monitoring Board has allowed for trial continuation.The combined use of a novel “off the shelf” cell together with a minimally invasive 30 minute delivery method provides a potentially paradigm-shifting approach to cardiac regenerative therapy.

http://www.translational-medicine.com/content/11/1/56/abstract

Endometrial Stem Cells Yeild Postive Clinical Trial Results for Heart Disease

More progress reported on the treatment of heart disease with endometrial stem cells. Neil Riordan, PhD is one of the early pioneers of endometrial stem cell technology. Dr. Riordan is also the Founder and President of the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama.

Positive Two-Month Data From RECOVER-ERC Congestive Heart Failure Trial

SAN DIEGO, CA–(Marketwire – Jun 4, 2012) – Medistem Inc. (PINKSHEETS: MEDS) announced today positive safety data from the first 5 patients enrolled in the Non-Revascularizable IschEmic Cardiomyopathy treated with Retrograde COronary Sinus Venous DElivery of Cell TheRapy (RECOVER-ERC) trial. The clinical trial uses the company’s “Universal Donor” Endometrial Regenerative Cells (ERC) to treat Congestive Heart Failure (CHF).

According to the study design, after 5 patients enter the trial, they must be observed for a two month time period before additional patients are allowed to enter the study. Patient data was analyzed by the study’s independent Data Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB), which concluded that based on lack of adverse effects, the study be allowed to continue recruitment.

“Medistem is developing a treatment for CHF that uses a 30-minute catheter-based procedure to administer the ERC stem cell into the patients’ hearts. The achievement of 2 month patient follow-up with no adverse events is a strong signal for us that our new approach to this terrible condition is feasible,” said Thomas Ichim, CEO of Medistem.

The RECOVER-ERC trial will treat a total of 60 patients with end-stage heart failure with three concentrations of ERC stem cells or placebo. The clinical trial is being conducted by Dr. Leo Bockeria, Chairman of the Backulev Centre for Cardiovascular Surgery, in collaboration with Dr. Amit Patel, Director of Clinical Regenerative Medicine at University of Utah.

“As a professional drug developer, I am very optimistic of a stem cell product that can be used as a drug. The ERC stem cell can be stored frozen indefinitely, does not need matching with donors, and can be injected in a simple 30-minute procedure into the heart,” said Dr. Sergey Sablin, Vice President of Medistem and co-founder of the multi-billion dollar NASDAQ company Medivation.

Currently patients with end-stage heart failure, such as the ones enrolled in the RECOVER-ERC study, have no option except for heart transplantation, which is limited by side effects and lack of donors. In contrast to other stem cells, ERC can be manufactured inexpensively, do not require tissue matching, and can be administered in a minimally-invasive manner. Animal experiments suggest ERC are more potent than other stem cell sources at restoring heart function. The FDA has approved a clinical trial of ERC in treatment of critical limb ischemia in the USA.

About Medistem Inc.
Medistem Inc. is a biotechnology company developing technologies related to adult stem cell extraction, manipulation, and use for treating inflammatory and degenerative diseases. The company’s lead product, the endometrial regenerative cell (ERC), is a “universal donor” stem cell being developed for critical limb ischemia and heart failure. A publication describing the support for use of ERC for this condition may be found at http://www.translational-medicine.com/content/pdf/1479-5876-6-45.pdf.

Cautionary Statement
This press release does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any of our securities. This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Forward-looking statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties, some of which cannot be predicted or quantified. Future events and actual results could differ materially from those set forth in, contemplated by, or underlying the forward-looking information. Factors which may cause actual results to differ from our forward-looking statements are discussed in our Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2007 as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Medistem Contact:

Thomas Ichim
Chief Executive Officer
Medistem Inc.
9255 Towne Centre Drive
Suite 450
San Diego
CA 92122
858 349 3617
858 642 0027
www.medisteminc.com
twitter: @thomasichim

2012-06-06T17:50:59+00:00June 6th, 2012|Adult Stem Cells, Heart Disease, News, Stem Cell Research|

Making Blood Cells into Heart Cells

Vojdani et al. Hum Cell. 2011 Mar;24(1):35-42
One of the major debates in the area of stem cell therapy is whether adult stem cells are capable of directly transforming (differentiating) into new tissue, or whether the therapeutic effects of administered stem cells occur because of growth factors produced by the injected stem cells. There are supporting data for both possibilities. The direct differentiation of adult stem cells into damaged tissue is supported by studies showing donor-derived adult tissue formed in patients treated. However in many situations that amount of new tissue found is relatively small. Supporting the “growth factor” hypothesis are numerous studies showing that administration of the tissue culture media that the stem cells have been grown in is capable of eliciting therapeutic effects.
Besides adult stem cells differentiating into other cells, there is some belief that other cells of the body are capable of this “transdifferenetiation” ability. For example, there was some work suggesting that B cells are capable of transforming into monocytes. There is some similarity between memory T and B cells with stem cells in that both of them express telomerase in a similar manner as stem cells. Therefore it would be interesting to see if B or T cells may express potential for differentiation into other cells. This is what was investigated in a recent paper (Vojdani et al. Cardiomyocyte marker expression in a human lymphocyte cell line using mouse cardiomyocyte extract. Hum Cell. 2011 Mar;24(1):35-42)
The investigators used a human B cell line called Raji. These cells are immortalized, therefore they may express some of the properties associated with pluripotency. What I mean is that generally cancer cells seem to start reexpressing proteins associated with “earlier” cells and possibly stem cells. For example, cancer cells are known to start re-expressing embryonic stem cell markers such as Oct-4 (Huang et al. Med Oncol. 2011 May 1).
Usually stem cells are made to differentiate into various tissues by exposing them to extracts of the cells that you want them to become. By extracts is usually meant the protein content of the cells after breaking up the cells either through freeze-thaw, sonication, or hypotonic lysis. In the current experiment the Raji cells were “retrodifferentiated” by treatment with 5-azacytidine, which is a DNA methylase inhibitor, as well as the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A. These chemicals act to remove methylation of the cells, as well as to “open up” the histones by allowing for histone acetylation, respectively. To these undifferentiated cells the extracts from mouse heart cells were added. An interesting method of adding the extracts was used. The cell membrane was temporarily permeabilized and the extracts were added.
After 10 days, 3, and 4 weeks the cells started adhering and expressed a morphology similar to heart cells. Interestingly the cells stated expressing myosin heavy chain, α-actinin and cardiac troponin T after 3 and 4 weeks. Flow cytometry confirmed these data. In cells exposed to trichostatin A and 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and permeabilized in the presence of the cardiomyocyte extract, troponin T expression was seen in 3.53% of the cells and 3.11% of them expressed α-actinin. These data suggest that pluripotency may be expressed by cells other than conventional stem cells. These experiments are similar to those performed by Collas’ group who demonstrated that administration of cytoplasm from Jurkat T cells to fibroblasts is capable of inducing the transdifferentiation of fibroblasts into cells that express T cell receptor and are capable of secreting IL-2 in response to ligation of the T cell receptor. This reminds us of the opposite of reprogramming by nuclear transfer (eg cloning).

2012-03-31T19:56:18+00:00March 31st, 2012|Heart Disease, News, Stem Cell Research|

New stem cell study promises to heal the heart

Miami Herald, Fred Tasker ftasker@MiamiHerald.com
University of Miami cardiologist led by Dr. Joshua Hare reported success in a small, preliminary human clinical trial of a new stem cell therapy they hope some day will routinely mend human hearts and reduce the need for lifelong medication, possibly even for transplants. The study was published in the peer reviewed journal Circulation Research (Williams et al. Circ Res. 2011 Apr 1;108(7):792-6.).
In the study eight patients of approximately 57.2±13.3 years of age received transendocardial, intramyocardial injection of their own (autologous) bone marrow stem cells (mononuclear or mesenchymal stem cells) in left ventrical scar and border zone. All patients who underwent the procedure had no serious adverse events. Cardiac MRI at 1 year demonstrated a decrease in end diastolic volume (208.7±20.4 versus 167.4±7.32 mL; P=0.03), a trend toward decreased end systolic volume (142.4±16.5 versus 107.6±7.4 mL; P=0.06), decreased infarct size (P<0.05), and improved regional LV function. This study is different than previous studies performed by Dr. Hare’s group that used stem cell administration intravenously. The belief is that directly placing the stem cells into the heart muscle may cause better therapeutic effects as compared to injection intravenously and letting them home to where they need to be. “That’s the Holy Grail, the quest the whole field has been pursuing for close to a decade, and this is evidence we’re on the right track,” said Dr. Joshua Hare. He did, however, emphasize that the current trial is only a small, run-up phase of extensive testing that will take up to five years and involve dozens of hospitals and hundreds of patients before obtaining U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for routine use. The trial was primarily about the safety of the procedure, and all eight patients came through without significant side effects, he said. The procedure also reduced the size of hearts swollen by previous heart attacks, a condition called cardiomyopathy or simply heart failure. Max Eaton, the 68-year-old direct-buy franchise owner who was patient No.1 said that he is thankful he was part of the trial, adding that he had just completed a 2.8-mile, 41-minute walk around his neighborhood in Lauderdale-by-the-Sea. “I feel very grateful,” he said. “Almost certainly, I would be deceased or in much worse shape had I not had the opportunity to be in this program.” Eaton’s part of the testing is finished. He says he’s glad he took part, even though it hasn’t quite turned him into an Olympic runner. “I still get chest pains at times. It depends on the time of year. I had my heart attack 11 years ago in the fall. That’s when I get them,” he said. But he adds: “I’m not ready to go. I’ll keep going as long as I can enjoy what’s to be enjoyed.” An explanation of stem cell clinical trials for heart failure may be seen at in one of our videos, presented on this link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfSdCYFNdPw

2012-03-17T20:13:28+00:00March 17th, 2012|Clinical Trials, Heart Disease, News, Stem Cell Research|

Rare Heart Defect Reproduced in Petri Dish, Hope for Cure

Dr. Ananya Mandal, MD

A team of researchers has created beating heart cells in the lab using skin cells of children with a rare heart defect. The team, led by Ricardo Dolmetsch of Stanford University took skin cells from children with Timothy syndrome, a rare heart condition commonly associated with autism, as well as syndactyly (webbing of fingers and toes).

The process the team underwent included reprogramming the stem cells and then developing them into cardiac cells in order to have a human model to test on, instead of mice models. “Because every cell in our body has the same genetic programming, that means we can take skin cells and reprogram them to generate stem cells, and we can take those cells to make heart cells,” said Dolmetsch.

Once the heart cells were developed, the team then used them to test several heart rhythm drugs. Unfortunately, none of the drugs initially tested corrected the heart problems associated with Timothy syndrome. However, further research and testing resulted in the discovery of the success of a cancer compound roscovitine, which is now in phase 2 clinical trials. Dolmetsch added that “The potential is really large”, Stanford has applied for patents on this technology and several drug companies have expressed interest in this research.

2012-02-13T20:30:05+00:00February 13th, 2012|Heart Disease, News, Stem Cell Research|

Medistem Begins Phase II Clinical Trial for Heart Failure

Medistem Inc announced today treatment of 3 heart failure patients in the Non-Revascularizable IschEmic Cardiomyopathy treated with Retrograde COronary Sinus Venous DElivery of Cell TheRapy (RECOVER-ERC) trial. The trial is aimed at assessing safety and efficacy of the company’s Endometrial Regenerative Cell (ERC) stem cell product in 60 heart failure patients who have no available treatment options. The cells were discovered by Dr. Neil Riordan and the team at Medistem. The “Universal Donor” adult stem cells will be administered using a novel catheter-based retrograde administration methodology that directly implants cells in a simple, 30 minute, procedure.

“We are honored to have had the opportunity to present at the prestigious Cardiovascular Stem Cell Research Symposium, alongside companies such as Athersys, Aastrom, Pluristem, Cardio3, Cytori, and Mesoblast,” stated Thomas Ichim, CEO of Medistem. “The RECOVER-ERC trial is the first trial combining a novel stem cell, with a novel administration procedure. Today cardiac administration of stem cells is relatively invasive and can only be performed at specialized institutions, we feel the retrograde procedure will circumvent this hurdle.”

Medistem has been focusing on the endometrium because this is a unique tissue in that it undergoes approximately 500 cycles of highly vascularized tissue growth and regression within a tightly controlled manner in the lifetime of the average female. One of the first series of data describing stem cells in the endometrium came from Prianishnikov in 1978 who reported that three types of stem cells exist: estradiol-sensitive cells, estradiol- and progesterone-sensitive cells and progesterone-sensitive cells.

Interestingly, a study in 1982 demonstrated that cells in the endometrium destined to generate the decidual portion of the placenta are bone marrow derived, which prompted the speculation of a stem cell like cell in the endometrium. Further hinting at the possibility of stem cells in the endometrium were studies demonstrating expression of telomerase in endometrial tissue collected during the proliferative phase. One of the first reports of cloned stem cells from the endometrium was by Gargett’s group who identified clonogenic cells capable of generating stromal and epithelial cell colonies, however no differentiation into other tissues was reported. The phenotype of these cells was found to be CD90 positive and CD146 positive. The cells isolated by this group appear to be related to maintaining structural aspects of the endometrium but to date have not demonstrated therapeutic potential. In 2007, Meng et al, used the process of cloning rapidly proliferating adherence cells derived from menstrual blood and generated a homogenous cell population expressing CD9, CD29, CD41a, CD44, CD59, CD73, CD90, and CD105 and lacking CD14, CD34, CD45 and STRO-1 expression. Shortly after, Patel’s group reported a population of cells isolated using c-kit selection of menstrual blood mononuclear cells. The cells had a similar phenotype, proliferative capacity, and ability to be expanded for over 68 doublings without induction of karyotypic abnormalities. Interestingly both groups found expression of the pluripotency gene OCT-4 but not NANOG. More recent investigations have confirmed these initial findings. For example, Park et al demonstrated that endometrial cells are significantly more potent originating sources for dedifferentiation into inducible pluripotent cells as compared to other cell populations. Specifically, human endometrial cells displayed accelerated expression of endogenous NANOG and OCT4 during reprogramming compared with neonatal skin fibroblasts. Additionally, the reprogramming resulted in an average colony-forming iPS efficiency of 0.49 ± 0.10%, with a range from 0.31-0.66%, compared with the neonatal skin fibroblasts, resulting in an average efficiency of 0.03 ± 0.00% per transduction, with a range from 0.02-0.03%. Suggesting pluripotency within the endometrium compartment, another study demonstrated that purification of side population (eg rhodamine effluxing) cells from the endometrium results in a population of cells expressing transdifferentiation potential with a genetic signature similar to other types of somatic stem cells.

Given the possibility of ERC playing a key role in angiogenesis, Murphy et al utilized an aggressive hindlimb ischemia model combined with nerve excision in order to generate a model of limb ischemia resulting in limb loss. ERC administration was capable of reducing limb loss in all treated animals, whereas control animals suffered necrosis. In the same study, ERC were demonstrated to inhibit ongoing mixed lymphocyte reaction, stimulate production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 and inhibit production of IFN-g and TNF-alpha. It is important to note that the animal model involved administration of human ERC into immunocompetent BALB/c mice. The relationship between angiogenesis and post myocardial infarct healing is well-known. Given previous work by Umezawa’s group demonstrating myocytic differentiation of ERC-like cells, administration of ERC into a model of post infarct cardiac injury was performed. Recovery was compared to bone marrow MSC. A superior rate of post-infarct recovery of ejection fraction, as well as reduction in fibrosis was observed with the ERC-like cells. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the cells were capable of functionally integrating with existing cardiomyocytes and exerted effects through direct differentiation. The investigators also demonstrated in vitro generation of cardiomyocyte cells that had functional properties.

The RECOVER-ERC TRIAL that has begun will recruit 60 patients with congestive heart failure, which will be randomized into 3 groups of 20 patients each. Group 1 will receive 50 million ERC, Group 2 will receive 100 million and Group 3 will receive 200 million. Cells will be administered via catheter-based retrograde administration into the coronary sinus, a 30 minute procedure developed by Dr. Amit Patel’s Team. Each group will comprise of 15 patients receiving cells and 5 patients receiving placebo. Efficacy endpoints include ECHO and MRI analysis, which will be conducted at 6 months after treatment. The trial design is similar to the recent Mesoblast Phase II cardiac study, in order to enable comparison of efficacy.

2012-01-30T18:42:22+00:00January 30th, 2012|Adult Stem Cells, Heart Disease, News, Stem Cell Research|

Bone Marrow Stem Cells Significantly Improve Cardiac Mortality Rate in Heart Disease Patients

Texas Heart Institute researcher, Emerson Perin MD, PhD revealed that heart patients who were treated with bone marrow-derived adult stem cells died at a significantly lower rate that those who did not receive stem cells. Dr. Perin’s scientific findings represent yet another positive step in the ongoing fight against heart disease.

Dr. Perin is the Director of Clinical Research for Cardiovascular Medicine and Medical Director for the Stem Cell Institute at the Texas Heart Institute in Houston, Texas. Dr. Perin’s study showed that patients treated with stem cells were 90% less likes to die from an adverse cardiac event than patients who were not treated with stem cells.

“We obtained remarkable results from our study in which we injected stem cells derived from the bone marrow of a healthy donor into patients with heart failure. Heart function and exercise capacity improved in some cell-treated patients. Most importantly, cell therapy significantly reduced cardiac adverse events, including death. Three of 15 (20%) control patients died of cardiac causes, whereas only 1 of 45 (2%) cell-treated patients had a cardiac-related death. Despite the small numbers, our findings showed that cell therapy significantly improved cardiac mortality,” said Dr. Perin.

2012-01-25T18:44:01+00:00January 25th, 2012|Adult Stem Cells, Heart Disease, News, Stem Cell Research|

The Role of Adult Stem Cells in Angioplasty

The National Institute of Health has granted the Creighton School of Medicine $3.3 million dollars to study repairing damaged coronary arteries with adult stem cells. Such damage can occur when patients undergo coronary artery angioplasty and stenting.

A serious problem that occurs is the re-narrowing (restenosis) of coronary arteries after stent placement. Stents are used to help widen narrowed arteries. Restenosis can be reduced by using drug-eluding stents but they can also lead to deposits of blood platelets within the artery that destroy its lining. To counteract this effect, anti-platelet therapy is employed. However, upset stomach, diarhea and nausea are serious side effects that are caused by anti-platelet therapy.

Creighton researchers, Devendra Agrawal, Ph.D, Michael Del Core and William Hunter are the primary and co-investigators. Dr. Agrawal is a professor of biomedical sciences. Dr. Del Core is a cardiologist and Dr. Hunter is a pathologist.

Autologous mesenchymal stem cells will be delivered with a specialized gene into the coronary arteries of pigs. The goal of this study is to determine if adult stem cell + gene therapy is superior to drug eluting stents, which are today’s standard of care. Such a treatment could eliminate the need for stents altogether if successful.

Recent research has shown that angioplasty and stenting – commonly used to open narrowed coronary arteries – are not as effective as once thought.

The Archives of Internal Medicine published a study of 15,000 patients showing that angioplasty + stenting can cause more harm than good in certain patients. The study determined that 10% of patients had to be readmitted to a hospital within 30 days of stenting and that they were at a higher risk of death within 1 year than the other 90%.

2012-01-24T18:48:50+00:00January 24th, 2012|Adult Stem Cells, Heart Disease, News, Stem Cell Research|

Medistem and Licensee ERCell Receive Russian Regulatory Approval for the RECOVER-ERC Trial

The clinical trial, Non-Revascularizable IschEmic Cardiomyopathy treated with Retrograde COronary Sinus Venous DElivery of Cell TheRapy (RECOVER-ERC), is being led by Principle Investigator Dr. Leo Bockeria, Chairman of the Backulev Center http://www.bakulev.ru/en/about/director/.

The Backulev Center is Russia’s premier institute for cardiovascular surgery and cardiology. Every year the Backulev Center performs approximately 30,000 diagnostic and treatment procedures, which includes 7,000 open heart surgeries and more than 12,000 angioplasties.

The RECOVER-ERC trial will recruit 60 patients with congestive heart failure, and randomize the patients into 3 groups of 20 patients each. Group 1 will receive 50 million ERC, Group 2 will receive 100 million and Group 3 will receive 200 million. Each group will have 15 patients receiving cells and 5 patients receiving placebo. Efficacy endpoints include ECHO and MRI analysis, which will be conducted at 6 months after treatment.

“I joined Medistem and personally invested into the company because of its strong science and intellectual property position. It is this strong science that has allowed for such a rapid progression of the ERC product from discovery, to animal studies, and now to approval for initiation of efficacy finding studies,” said Dr. Vladimir Bogin, President and Chairman of Medistem, and a Yale-trained physician practicing in the USA. “As a medical doctor I see the suffering and lack of options for patients with CHF. I am proud that our team is able to offer hope.”

This is the second clinical trial that Medistem has been granted approvals for. In September 2011, the company received FDA clearance for beginning a 15 patient trial treating critical limb ischemia patients together with Dr. Michael Murphy at Indiana University.

“We are especially grateful to our Russian licensee ERCell LLC which has worked intensely with our CRO and the Backulev Center in laying down the groundwork for this approval,” said Vladimir Zaharchook, Vice President and Vice Chairman of Medistem. “To our knowledge, ERCell is the only company in Russia working on a stem cell product that can be reproducibly manufactured, frozen, and sold as a drug, not a procedure.”

“This approval is a key milestone for ERCell. Given that Russia has one of the highest incidences of heart failure per capita in the world, we are confident that we can make a difference in patients’ lives and position Russia as an international leader in cell therapy,” said Tereza Ustimova, CEO of ERCell.

About Medistem Inc.
Medistem Inc. is a biotechnology company developing technologies related to adult stem cell extraction, manipulation, and use for treating inflammatory and degenerative diseases. The company’s lead product, the endometrial regenerative cell (ERC), is a “universal donor” stem cell being developed for critical limb ischemia. A publication describing the support for use of ERC for this condition may be found at http://www.translational-medicine.com/content/pdf/1479-5876-6-45.pdf. ERC can be purchased for scientific use through Medistem’s collaborator, General Biotechnology http://www.gnrlbiotech.com/?page=catalog_endometrial_regenerative_cells.

Cautionary Statement
This press release does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any of our securities. This press release may contain certain forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Forward-looking statements are inherently subject to risks and uncertainties, some of which cannot be predicted or quantified. Future events and actual results could differ materially from those set forth in, contemplated by, or underlying the forward-looking information. Factors which may cause actual results to differ from our forward-looking statements are discussed in our Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2007 as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

2012-01-24T18:45:51+00:00January 24th, 2012|Adult Stem Cells, Heart Disease, News, Stem Cell Research|