Applied Stem Cell Therapy Expert, Neil Riordan, PhD, Authors “Cell Therapy for Liver Failure: A New Horizon” in Contemporary Liver Transplantation Medical Reference

DALLAS-FORT WORTH, TEXAS (PRWEB) NOVEMBER 08, 2016 (Original Press Release on PRWeb)

Picture of Neil Riordan, PhD

Neil Riordan, PhD

A new chapter by renowned applied stem cell therapy expert, Neil Riordan, PhD of the Riordan-McKenna Institute in Southlake, Texas; Medistem Labs Panama, and the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama, entitled, “Cell Therapy for Liver Failure: A New Horizon” is now available in the printed and online medical reference, “Contemporary Liver Transplantation – The Successful Liver Transplant Program”.

Contemporary Liver Transplantation provides a comprehensive review of the most crucial and provocative aspects of liver transplantation. The reference covers all disciplines involved in a multidisciplinary liver transplant team; provides a valuable resource for surgeons, hepatologists, anesthesiologists, transplant coordinators and administrators, amongst others; addresses organizational issues that are vital to the good performance of transplant programs; and offers the first 360-degree analysis of liver transplantation.

Liver failure is the seventh largest cause of death in industrialized countries. It occurs as a result of a number of acute and chronic clinical inciting factors, including drug-/alcohol-induced hepatotoxicity, viral infections, vascular injury, autoimmune disease, or genetic predisposition. The only available cure, liver transplantation, is severely limited by a lack of donors and further complicated by the adverse effects of chronic immune suppression.

In his chapter on stem cell therapy for liver failure, Dr. Riordan examines pre-clinical data and analyzes published clinical trials to identify promising sources of autologous stem cells to treat liver failure including: bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC), adipose tissue MSC (AT-MSC), and bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMC) including their purified forms. In addition, he delves into allogeneic stem cells such as those harvested from umbilical cords after normal, healthy births.

“Many liver failure patients contact our clinics in Panama and Texas asking if there is anything we can do for them. Unfortunately, we have to tell them that we cannot treat liver failure. Even though some clinical trials have shown signals of efficacy, which is encouraging, I don’t think sufficient rationale exists to treat liver failure patients with the types of stem cells I’ve studied at present,” stated Dr. Riordan.

About Riordan-McKenna Institute (RMI)

RMI specializes in non-surgical treatment of acute and chronic orthopedic conditions using *amniotic tissue allograft and bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) that is harvested using the patented BioMAC bone marrow aspiration cannula. Common conditions treated include meniscal tears, ACL injuries, rotator cuff injuries, runner’s knee, tennis elbow, and joint pain due to degenerative conditions like osteoarthritis.

Additionally, RMI augments orthopedic surgeries with BMAC and amniotic tissue allograft to promote better post-surgical outcomes and uses amniotic membranes as part of a complete wound care treatment regimen.

BMAC contains a patient’s own mesenchymal stem cells (MSC,) hematopoietic stem cells (CD34+), growth factors and other progenitor cells. Amniotic tissue allograft is composed of collagens and other structural proteins, which provide a biologic matrix that supports angiogenesis, tissue growth and new collagen during tissue regeneration and repair.

*Amniotic tissue is donated after normal healthy births.

Riordan-McKenna Institute Website: http://www.rmiclinic.com

Riordan-McKenna Institute
801 E. Southlake Blvd.
Southlake, Texas 76092

Tel: (817) 776-8155
Toll Free: (877) 899-7836
Fax: (817) 776-8154

About Stem Cell Institute Panama

Founded in 2007 on the principles of providing unbiased, scientifically sound treatment options; the Stem Cell Institute (SCI) has matured into the world’s leading adult stem cell therapy and research center. In close collaboration with universities and physicians world-wide, our comprehensive stem cell treatment protocols employ well-targeted combinations of autologous bone marrow stem cells, autologous adipose stem cells, and donor *human umbilical cord stem cells to treat: autism, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, heart disease, and autoimmune diseases.

In partnership with Translational Biosciences, a subsidiary of Medistem Panama, SCI provides clinical services for ongoing clinical trials that are assessing safety and signs of efficacy for autism, multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and spinal cord injury using allogeneic umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSC) and hU-MSC-derived mesenchymal trophic factors (MTF). In 2017, Translation Biosciences plans to expand its clinical trial portfolio to include heart disease and cerebral palsy.
*umbilical cord tissue is donated after normal, healthy births

For more information on stem cell therapy:

Stem Cell Institute Website: http://www.cellmedicine.com
Stem Cell Institute
Via Israel & Calle 66
Plaza Pacific Office #2A
Panama City, Panama

About Medistem Panama Inc.
Since opening its doors in 2007, Medistem Panama Inc. has developed adult stem cell-based products from human umbilical cord tissue and blood, adipose (fat) tissue and bone marrow. Medistem operates an 8000 sq. ft. ISO 9001-certified laboratory in the prestigious City of Knowledge. The laboratory is fully licensed by the Panamanian Ministry of Health and features 3 class 10000 clean rooms, class 100 laminar flow hoods, and class 100 incubators.

Medistem Panama Website: http://www.medistempanama.com

About Contemporary Liver Transplantation

Edited by Cataldo Doria, Contemporary Liver Transplantation provides a comprehensive review of the most crucial and provocative aspects of liver transplantation. It represents a unique source of information and guidance for the current generation of transplant surgeons that evolved from being pure clinicians into savvy administrators knowledgeable in every regulatory aspect governing transplantation.

The book contains 35 chapters covering every single aspect of the surgical operation in the donors as well as the recipients of liver transplants. The pre-operative work-up, as well as the post-operative immunosuppression management and the treatment of recurrent diseases are addressed in detail. Single chapters are dedicated to controversial issues like transplantation in patients diagnosed with NASH, transplantation for patients diagnosed with HCC beyond Milan criteria and usage of HIV positive donors. Dedicated chapters on HCV, HCC, FHF and NASH will make this book a unique resource for any health care provider part of the multidisciplinary liver transplant team.

The book goes beyond the analysis of the formal medical and surgical aspects of liver transplantation and introduces deep knowledge on key aspects of contemporary transplant programs, such as: physical rehabilitation, palliative care, pregnancy, the multiple requirements of regulatory agencies ruling transplantation, quality measurements for transplant programs, finance and liability.

The book is organized in 9 sections focusing on each key aspect of liver transplantation. Contemporary Liver Transplantation addresses the need and the questions of the multidisciplinary group involved including surgeons, Hepatologists, anesthesiologists, infectious disease specialists, radiologists, transplant coordinators, financial specialists, epidemiologists and administrators.

Contemporary Liver Transplantation Online: http://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319072081

Stem cell pioneer sets sights on Japan – Japan Times features Neil Riordan, PhD of Medistem Panama

Japan Times Article Medistem

“We enjoy the advantage of having a large amount of clinical data on 2,000 patients. So we analyzed who received which cells and which cells worked best in different conditions. This allowed us to create our selection process through molecular profiling,” explained Medistem (Panama) Founder and CEO Dr. Neil Riordan.

Operating what is arguably the country’s most advanced laboratory, an 8,000-sq-ft facility in the City of Knowledge science and technology cluster, Medistem has raised its profile in recent years as it develops stem cell-based products for clinical trials for treatment of autism, asthma, multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and spinal cord injuries.

Utilizing its patented technologies, Medistem harvests human adult stem cells from umbilical cords, tissues and blood as well as from bone marrow and adipose tissue. “We have intellectual property on a methodology for basically defining which are good cells, which are mediocre and which are the useless ones. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved our cells for compassionate use in the United States. This is a big step,” Riordan said.

Compassionate use, also known as expanded access, refers to the use of investigational new drugs outside of a clinical trial by patients with serious, life-threatening conditions. After finishing its first prospective clinical trial, and with six others in the pipeline, the company is considering the favorable regulatory conditions for cell therapy in Japan, now a promising market for its products.

“Japan has a law on the books that allows a company of our size to commercialize such products. That makes it our number one priority. We are gearing up to present our data to regulators, as well holding talks with potential partners over there,” Riordan added.

Neil Riordan PhD – on opening a stem cell clinic in the United States

Stem Cell Pioneers featured Dr. Riordan in its February installment of “Ask the Doctor”, a monthly segment that features stem cell scientists and doctors answering questions from readers about stem cell therapy.

Over the next several days, we will share these questions and Dr. Riordan’s answers with our readers.

Question for Dr. Riordan: If the FDA loosens regulations in the U.S., do you have any plans to open a clinic here?

Dr. Riordan’s Answer: Unfortunately I don’t see FDA loosening regulations any time soon so I have no plans to do anything in the U.S. using umbilical cord MSCs or even autologous SVF in the near future.

It would be great if the U.S. would follow Japan’s lead. The Japanese parliament passed legislation in November of last year that essentially allows a company to market a cell product after the product has been demonstrated to be safe. Quoting from an Athersys press release: “Recently, Japan’s parliament enacted new legislation to promote the safe and accelerated development of treatments using stem cells. The new regenerative medicine law and revised pharmaceutical affairs law define products containing stem cells as regenerative medicine products and allow for the conditional approval of such products if safety has been confirmed in clinical trials, even if their efficacy has not been fully demonstrated.”

So you can guess where everyone is running to and isn’t the U.S. Here are press releases from Mesoblast and Athersys, respectively:


http://globenewswire.com/news-release/2013/11/25/592037/10059311/en/New-Japanese-Regenerative-Medicine-Legislation-and-Commercial-Opportunities-for-Stem-Cell-Products.html

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/athersys-announces-patents-japan-stem-120000430.html

Regarding plans for the U.S., I have thankfully partnered with Dr. Wade McKenna, who is Board Certified in Orthopedic surgery and Fellowship trained in Trauma and Trauma Reconstructive Surgery. Dr. McKenna has more experience using bone marrow concentrate for orthopedic conditions that anyone I know. We are opening a regenerative orthopedic center in the Dallas area hopefully by mid-April of this year. It will be in a new building and is being built out now. The center is called the Riordan McKenna Institute. It is located in Southlake, Texas, which is between Dallas and Ft. Worth, very near DFW airport.

Neil Riordan PhD on stem cell expansion in stem cell therapy

Stem Cell Pioneers featured Dr. Riordan in its February installment of “Ask the Doctor”, a monthly segment that features stem cell scientists and doctors answering questions from readers about stem cell therapy.

Over the next several days, we will share these questions and Dr. Riordan’s answers with our readers.

Question: Are there some conditions such as neurological ones that respond better when the cells are greatly expanded? Is a high quantity essential for success or is that something that may be more of a selling point at some clinics? I have also seen this advertised for COPD and other conditions. It’s almost like the more cells the better, but I would like your opinion.

Dr. Riordan’s Answer: That really depends on the quality of the cells after expansion. If they are still robust, not senescent, and still have a good secretion profile, then the more the better may be useful up to a point. If you take a small pool of starter cells and expand them to exhaustion, then I don’t think you are going to have a very good product. The MSCs used in Panama are not expanded beyond passage 5—a point at which there is no senescence in the population and they have a robust cytokine secretion profile. In order to use only cells that meet our release criteria, cells from approximately one (1.2 to be exact) out of 10 donated umbilical cords are used.

Contrast that to cells from a patient’s own fat tissue that are expanded. Firstly, the starting cells may, and many times are not very robust—they secrete little or no beneficial cytokines or chemokines, and must be expanded to hilt in order to hit the cell number. Please see my answer to number 7 for more on this subject.

This brings up a slightly different, yet related topic. There has been a lot of talk at recent meetings about more defined endpoints for the cells being used, and I couldn’t agree more. There are MSCs from bone marrow, menstrual blood, fat tissue, umbilical cord (even different parts of the umbilical cord—around the blood vessels, from the Wharton’s jelly, from the subepithelium, from the cord blood itself—which are most likely contaminants from a bruised placenta rather than the blood), teeth, amniotic membrane, amniotic fluid just to name sources in the “we didn’t mess with mother nature” adult stem cell world. Add to that the infinite variables when you consider the age and physical condition of the donor, particularly when using adipose or bone marrow as a source material and we, as a field, could be saying almost anything by using the term, “mesenchymal stem cell.” I think it is time that there is standardization in the field beyond the current definition of expressing/not expressing certain surface markers and the ability to differentiate into fat, bone, and cartilage. That standardization could come from using endpoints such as “remaining proliferative capacity (the number of doublings achievable in culture from the treatment cell bank), the secretome, even if there is standardization of one or two molecules, such as HGF, or one of the prostaglandins.

In the future I believe the field will take it a step further by measuring, even by a surrogate marker, the potential effects of the cells on the target condition. In the case of autoimmunity the cells and their secretions could be tested for their capacity to modulate the immune system. In the case of inflammatory conditions, the cells and their secretions could be tested for the ability to control or block inflammation.

Autologous Cell Therapies Do Not Represent a Public Health Risk and Should Not Be Regulated Like Drugs

SevOne Founder and Stem Cell Institute patient, Michael Phelan discusses what’s financially at stake for scientists, universities, drug companies, and the FDA who oppose autologous stem cell therapy and lobby for patients’ own stem cells to be regulated as drugs.

VIEW FULL ARTICLE

Forbes interview with Michael Phelan from Feb 2013: One Man’s Reluctant Tour for Adult Stem Cells by John Farrell

Excerpt:

“I chose the Stem Cell Institute because they published their research in Translational Medicine. In addition, I corresponded with physicians and researchers experienced in Autologous Stem Cell treatments, including Roger Nocera, author of Healing Cells – Cells that heal us from cradle to grave, and I also listened to Arnold Caplan of Case Western.

So, at a Johns Hopkins managed hospital in Panama I had a mini-liposuction procedure. From my adipose-fat tissue they separated and expanded my cells, which took about a week then they gave to me in an IV.

I had visual problems for over a year before treatment, including double vision. After my first treatment in May of 2012, my vision problems resolved and I was able to continue driving. My mental and physical energy improved dramatically. A number of other problems improved. So, I was pleased with the outcome.”

Medistem Panama Awarded ISO 9001 International Global Certification

Medistem Panama ISO 9001-2008 Logo

Awarded this:

CERTIFICATION

for the Quality Management System of:

MEDISTEM PANAMA

Offices included in the scope:

Ciudad del Saber, Edificio # 221, piso # 2,
Clayton, Ancón
Panama City, Republic of Panama

IAF ENAC Logos

The scope includes the following activities:

  • Isolation of stem cells from adipose tissue(ADSC) and mononuclear cells from bone marrow.
  • Expansion and harvest of mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord, adipose tissue and its derivatives.

ISO 9001:2008

Valid from 19, June 2016
Granted from Panama 20, June 2013

Antonio Martin
Director

IGC10126

IGC10126

VIDEO – The Science of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine – Arnold Caplan PhD (Part 6)

In part 6, Prof. Caplan discusses Trophic properties of mesenchymal stem cells; MSCs for heart disease; MSCs homing to heart injury site and also to skin incision site; MSCs limit left ventricular thinning following infarction; Trophic properties of MSCs: anti-apoptotic, anti-fibrotic, anti-scarring, angiogenic, mitotic; phase 1 data for allogeneic MSCs show fewer arrhythmias, prompt heart rate recovery, and improved lung function; autologous adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction for treatment of chronic heart disease; Active mesenchymal stem cell clinical trials around the world; Induction therapy with autologous MSCs in kidney transplants; MSCs can coax neural stem cells to become oligodendrocytes, curing mice with MS using allogeneic human MSCs.

The Science of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine – Arnold Caplan PhD (VIDEO Part 3)

In part 3, Professor Caplan discusses the science behind mesenchymal stem cells: sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), because all MSCs are pericytes one can find them in any tissue that has blood vessels, pericytes express markers of MSCs, frequency of pericytes in human tissue, most abundant source of pericytes is adipose (fat) tissue, adipose-derived stem cells, how MSCs are separated from fat, chemistries MSCs from different tissues are not the same, MSCs function at sites of injury, mesenchymal stem cell homing in mice, MSCs don’t make fat, they don’t make muscle. They come back as pericytes, and not all pericytes are MSCs.

Arnold Caplan and Riccardo Calafiore inside Medistem Panama stem cell laboratory

Arnold Caplan and Riccardo Calafiore in Medistem Panama Lab

Arnold Caplan PhD and Riccardo Calafiore

Prof. Arnold Caplan of Case Western Reserve University and Prof. Riccardo Calafiore of the University of Perugia, Italy inside our stem cell lab. Prof. Caplan and Prof. Calafiore toured one of our three clean rooms and viewed stem cells during their visit.

They were speaking in Panama City, Panama at “La Medicina Del Futuro En El Presente”, an event organized by the honarable Ruben Berrocal MD, Minister of Science, Technology and Innovation SENACYT (National Secretariat of Science, Technology and Innovation) and Prof. K. S. Jagannatha Rao, Ph.D., FNASc, FABAP, FASB, FLS (Reino Unido) Director INDICASAT-AIP (Instituto de Investigaciones Cientificas y Servicios de Alta Tecnologia – Institute for Scientific Research and High Technology Services).

Arnold Caplan PhD of Case Western Reserve University and Riccardo Calafiore of Perugia University in Italy tour Medistem stem cell lab in Panama

Arnold Caplan PhD, Neil Riordan PhD and Riccardo Calafiore MD at Medistem Labs Panama

Arnold Caplan PhD, Neil Riordan PhD and Riccardo Calafiore MD at Medistem Labs Panama

Professor Arnold Caplan (left) and Professor Riccardo Calafiore (right) pose with Medistem Labs Panama Founder, Neil Riordan, PhD. Dr. Riordan is also the Founder of Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama.

Prof. Caplan and Prof. Calafiore were in Panama City with Amit Patel MD to speak at “La Medicina Del Futuro En El Presente”, an event organized by the honarable Ruben Berrocal MD, Minister of Science, Technology and Innovation SENACYT (National Secretariat of Science, Technology and Innovation) and Prof. K. S. Jagannatha Rao, Ph.D., FNASc, FABAP, FASB, FLS (Reino Unido) Director INDICASAT-AIP (Instituto de Investigaciones Cientificas y Servicios de Alta Tecnologia – Institute for Scientific Research and High Technology Services).

Prof. Caplan is a Professor of Biology and General Medical Sciences (oncology) at Case Western Reserve University and the Director of the Skeletal Research Center at Case Western Reserve. Prof. Caplan is widely regarded as “The father of the mesenchymal stem cell”.

Prof. Calafiore is the Head of the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at the Medical School at the University of Perugia, Italy and Director of the Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Endocrine and Organ Transplant at the University of Perugia School of Medicine. He is also a director at ALTuCELL.

Amit Patel, MD, MS, is an associate professor in the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery at the University of Utah School of Medicine and Director of Clinical Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering at the University of Utah

Neil Riordan PhD is Founder of Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama and the President of Medistem Panama. He is also CEO of Aidan Products.