Neil Riordan, PA, PhD Presents at the 5th Annual Perinatal Stem Cell Society Congress in Salt Lake City, UT on Thursday, February 28th

Neil Riordan, PA, PhD presented “Results From Panama Clinical Trials Using Human Umbilical Cord Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (HUCT-MSCs) for Multiple Sclerosis and Autism” at the 5th Annual Perinatal Stem Cell Society Congress in Salt Lake City, UT on Thursday, February 28th.

Image of Neil Riordan, PA, PhD

Neil Riordan, PA, PhD

SALT LAKE CITY (PRWEB) MARCH 01, 2019

Neil Riordan, PA, PhD presented “Results From Panama Clinical Trials Using Human Umbilical Cord Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (HUCT-MSCs) for Multiple Sclerosis and Autism” at the 5th Annual Perinatal Stem Cell Society Congress in Salt Lake City, UT on Thursday, February 28t.

During his talk, Dr. Riordan discussed his recently published phase I/II clinical trial entitled, “Clinical feasibility of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of multiple sclerosis”.

“It was an honor to speak with my distinguished peers on the advances of stem cell therapy in perinatal medicine today,” Neil H. Riordan, PA, PhD

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29523171

He also touched on his recently completed and soon-to-be-published phase 1/II clinical trial on autism, “Allogeneic Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy for Autism” (NCT02192749).

About Perinatal Stem Cell Society

In 2013, the International Perinatal Stem Cell Society, Inc. a non-profit (501(c)(3) organization was founded on the basic principle that stem cells from perinatal tissues contain enormous, untapped life potential to treat many diseases and disorders. Perinatal stem cell sources include: amnion, amniotic fluid, cord blood, cord tissue/wharton’s jelly, as well as placental blood and placental tissue. Perinatal stem cells are formed around the time of birth and are classified as adult stem cells but they really are more primitive then stem cells found in bone marrow or adipose tissue or other traditional sources of adult stem cells and as such, have greater therapeutic potential.

Learn more at http://www.perinatalstemcells.com

About Riordan Technologies

Riordan Technologies strives to improve the human condition through innovation in scientific research, regenerative medicine, and stem cell therapy. Riordan Technologies comprises companies founded by Neil Riordan, PA, PhD: Dallas-based Aidan Products, Signature Biologics, and Riordan Medical Institute, and Panama-based Stem Cell Institute and Medistem Panama.

Read Dr. Riordan’s Amazon #1 Best Seller: Stem Cell Therapy: A Rising Tide – How Stem Cells Are Disrupting Medicine and Transforming Lives

Learn more at at http://www.neilriordan.com

Stem Cell Treatments for Autism – James M’s Story

Donna: Hi, I’m Donna McCairn and this is my son…

James: James

Donna: And how old are you James?

James: 14 years old, 15…

Donna: Yeah, 15 in February. So, we came to Stem Cells last September and since then, the changes we’ve seen in James is that his math has really improved. For the first time he got two B’s at the end of last year for school. And then this year he had a target to get 70% mark by June of this year, but he actually got it when, James?

James: This month – for math.

Donna: For your test? And what have you noticed with the stem cells? What things have you found easier?

James: My daily life.

Donna: Such as?

James: Getting ready for school.

Donna: And what about your homework?

James: I’m completing my homework on time.

Donna: And so what we found at home is James is being more self-directed so instead of coming home and struggling to get through all the homework, he’s come home and sort of had that forward awareness where, “I’ve gotta get my homework done because it’s due tomorrow,” and sitting down and starting his homework unassisted, which has been a huge change. And what about with other people? What changes have you felt?

James: I’m talking to more people.

Donna: And are you less shy or more shy?

James: Less shy.

Donna: Ugh Huh. And what happened on this trip to Panama?

James: I made some friends.

Donna: It’s a first. As all the parents know, making friends is the hardest thing, isn’t it?

James: Yeah

Donna: Yeah. Reading people is really tricky. So with our home life, with his siblings, there’s been less arguing, more being friendly, more being able to reason, just not getting so uptight and blocked. He can understand others rather than being self-orientated and only interested in what he needs and getting frustrated. He’s starting to see his sisters’ point of view, But… They’re still not right are they?

James: Um, Hmm. (laughing)

Donna: And it’s those little things. So. James likes to be driven to school, but when I say, “No, you gotta go catch the bus,” he normally would have resisted and waited and waited, but what I’ve notice between the last stem cell visit and this visit is the ability for him to reason, “Okay, mom’s not going to drive me to school today. I just have to get ready and go.” Whereas before, he’d just wait, and just wait until someone just gave in, or at least walked him to the bus stop to get the bus. And what about coming home from school on your own on the bus?

James: I’m more happy.

Donna: And what about walking with the other boys?

James: I talk to them more.

Donna: And do you sometimes walk and get off the bus with the other boys and come the other way?

James: Yeah

Donna: So, it’s like he can get off at a stop where boys from his school get off together, and that’s a very new thing to go, “Oh, I need to be…” We all said, “You need to be in a group. You need pals.” What are you nudging me for? What’s the best thing about coming to Stem Cells?

James: The people and it doesn’t hurt. Oh, bringing your parents.

Donna: No, No, not parents. Being on holidays…

James: With mom.

Donna: Exactly! Being on holidays with mom. So if you want a great holiday, leave the kids. Leave the husband. Just come with your boy.

Joe Rogan Interview with Mel Gibson and Dr. Riordan

Joe Rogan interviews Stem Cell Institute founder Neil Riordan, PA, PhD and award-winning actor, director and producer Mel Gibson, who first brought his father to Panama at the age of 92.  Mel discusses his father’s miraculous recovery.  He is now 99.  Dr. Riordan discusses stem cell therapy using human *umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells including their application in conditions like multiple sclerosis and autism.

*umbilical cords are donated following normal, healthy births

Stem Cell Therapy for Autism – Brady B’s Story

Interview with the parents of Brady B, during his second round of stem cell therapy for autism at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama using *umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

For more information, visit: https://www.cellmedicine.com/stem-cell-therapy-for-autism/

*umbilical cords donated after normal, healthy births

Interview Transcript

Interviewer: Today is December 22nd 2017. Please give your names.

Michele: Steve and Michelle Bacon and this is Brady.

Interviewer: Brady’s diagnosis?

Michele: Brady was diagnosed when he was two and a half with autism.

Interviewer: So, this would be his second stem cell treatment?

Michelle: Umm, hmm.

Interviewer: The first treatment was performed when?

Michelle: April, 2017.

Interviewer: Can you describe his improvements?

Michelle: The first round of stem cells, after the second infusion, we were putting him to bed that night and he said spontaneously, without any requests or anything, us prompting, nothing…his first 3-word sentence. He said, “I want pizza.”

Steve: When Brady was diagnosed he was, or is diagnosed as non-verbal. So that was a complete surprise that he came up with a spontaneous 3-word phrase.

Michelle: And before that, he had only been doing like “echoing” and a lot of it was not understandable to everyone. I mean, we understood because we know him but other people wouldn’t have been able to understand.

Steve: Since stem cells, he’s become more patient and able to wait for things and not have to quick go and do something. He can stand in a line and wait now.

Michelle: He’s more… His school reported that he is more tolerant of transitions, like when they’re transitioning from a preferred activity to, like, work, like a work sheet – school stuff.

Steve: He’s able to read some sight words now since…

Michelle: About 30. Yeah, he can read words now. He wasn’t able to do that before. He can… It started out just recognizing like, from an array of three pictures, and then he would have like, “apple” or “banana” and he’d have a horse and a pencil and a banana and he cold match the word “banana” to the picture. And he would trade out the words and he could correctly identify which word went with which picture. And now, all we need is the flashcard of the word, no pictures, just like “horse” or “yellow”. And he can identify about 30 words. 30 or 40 words.

Steve: And he can now read some simple sentences with the sight words in it that he knows. And this is all new since stem cell treatments.

Michelle: Yeah, a lot more tolerant. Eye contact is better. He seeks out peers to play now whereas he didn’t before. Greetings are better – like “Hi” and “Bye”. Still working on the eye contact though. That one’s still kind of tough. He can look at you in a mirror, do eye contact in a mirror but the face is a little hard still.

Interviewer: Ok, anything else that you’d like to mention?

Michelle: Anything else guys?

Brother: He’s my brother.

Sister: [Inaudible]

Steve: More interactive with peers and family members.

Michelle: He’s definitely more interactive with everyone.

Interviewer: Ok.

Michelle: And no.. Oh yeah! He used to, it was hard always to get him to come out of his room. He would just want to sit in his room and play on his iPad and now he actually comes out and he sits with us a lot more. And he’s a lot more interactive with the family. We used to have a hard time getting him to stay at the table for dinner and now, he stays at the table no problems. He used to have meltdowns that would last 20 or 30 minutes. Now, he turns around in like, a minute. It’s so much better. His temperament is a lot better. I mean, he’s always been a very good boy but he gets rigid about things, you know? If he doesn’t have it just that way, it’s a 20 – 30 minute meltdown – before. Now, it’s much better.

Interviewer: Ok. That’s it. Thank you very much.

Everyone (including Brady): Cheese!

Stem Cell Therapy for Autism – Clara Goodman: ‘Never Give Up on Your Child’

Image of stem cell therapy patient Ari Goodman

 

By Jill Kirsch | December 28, 2017
Original Publication on Jewish Link of New Jersey

Following Ari Goodman’s first stem cell therapy last year, to treat what doctors called severe low-functioning autism, The Jewish Link reported on his progress and his family’s hope that they would be able to help him continue his journey towards recovery.

Ari was first diagnosed seven years ago, after he began losing skills at the age of 18 months. His mother, Clara, and father, Daniel, a 1990 graduate of Frisch who grew up in Parsippany, explored all therapies available to Ari, but nothing was able to reach him.

The family persevered, finally learning of the Stem Cell Institute, a facility in Panama that was known for successfully administering stem cell therapy to patients with autism. Clara and Daniel were determined to help Ari receive that treatment but, with the procedure and other costs totalling nearly $20,000, they feared it was beyond their reach.

Clara, ever her son’s champion, reached out to The Jewish Link, seeking assistance in sharing her family’s story, and the response went well beyond what they imagined. The Goodmans, residents of East Windsor, were able to take Ari for his first treatment in May of 2016, and the results, noted Clara, were “miraculous.” Within weeks the family saw Ari begin “coming back to us. We started to see changes,” she said.

Feeling eternally grateful to the greater Jewish community for its help, and hopeful for the first time in years, Clara again reached out, in December of 2016, through a follow-up article in The Jewish Link. This time the Goodmans were not surprised by the outpouring of support, but just as grateful. “It is amazing how many people are right there with us. Everyone who has cared about our story has helped in some way,” Clara remarked.

Ari, now 9 years old, received his second stem cell therapy earlier this year, and Clara was thrilled to discuss his progress with The Jewish Link. “Since February, his awareness of everything is 100 percent there,” she said. “He responds. His receptive language is amazing. He’s able to answer questions. He just knows everything and has opinions.”

Clara reports that Ari is now able to spontaneously ask for things and express wants and needs, though still only using one word at a time. “He has a sense of humor now. He laughs,” she said.

He is able to read sentences, and can spell words and put them together to form sentences. In fact, at school Ari is no longer in the class for children with autism; his progress has allowed him to move to a class for students with “multiple disabilities,” where the students are more social and conversational. His teachers have told Clara that Ari adds much to the classroom, and both students and teachers enjoy having him there.

“My hope is that he’ll develop more language,” said Clara. “I hope to mainstream him and maybe have him attend a Jewish school one day. We would love for him to learn Torah every day.”

For the first time, Clara is anxiously awaiting Ari’s annual IEP (Individualized Educational Plan) meeting next month, as she has already been told by his teachers that he has met all of his goals and they want to expand on that for next year. “I used to dread those meetings,” she stated. “Now I can’t wait. I’m looking forward to every day and seeing what new things he can do.”

Ari is “loving and affectionate, full of hugs and kisses,” Clara reported. “Doctors said he’d never do that.”

She continued, “We were told he would never be able to do any of these things. He is showing more every day that he’s whole. It’s in there and once the stem cells heal him it will all come back. He is proving everybody wrong and showing that Hashem is in charge, not any doctor.”

The Goodmans are hoping that a third treatment will “show more revealed miracles,” added Clara. He’s not conversational yet; I want the social aspect to come. I know he’s not out of the woods yet. He has a long way to go,” but “every time we go we see more and more improvement.”

While trials using adult stem cells are now ongoing at Duke University in North Carolina, America still does not have any treatments available that might benefit Ari. “We are that much closer to the FDA approving treatment,” Clara said. “But even then it still might not be covered.”

In the meantime, the Goodmans believe they must continue these treatments. “The stem cell therapy is allowing him to respond to all the therapies that weren’t working before. His body is healing and is open to it now,” added Clara.

“I feel like I have him back again and it’s the most wonderful feeling in the world,” she continued. “We felt like we lost him when he was diagnosed. Ari is proof that miracles do happen.”

“Ari has been through so much and he is still such a happy kid. He inspires others. I really believe that his mission in life is to heal the world; he’s helping us all be better people,” Clara stated. “His middle name is Netanel, which means ‘gift from God.’ He really is.”

Clara hopes that her family’s journey will provide strength to others who have children with autism. “There is an answer. Don’t ever give up on your child,” she said.

To help the Goodman family provide another stem cell treatment for Ari, please visit www.gofundme.com/aristemcelljourney or, to make a tax-deductible donation, send a check payable to “Congregation Toras Emes,” with “for Ari Goodman” noted in the memo line, and send ℅ Clara Goodman to 523 Nettleton Drive, East Windsor, NJ 08520.

By Jill Kirsch