Stem Cell Therapy for Knee Pain and Injuries – Teresa Hamrick’s Story

Registered Nurse and Stem Cell Recipient, Teresa Hamrick tells her uplifting story about how bone marrow stem cell therapy augmented with AlphaGEMS amniotic tissue product got her out of a wheelchair. Teresa received her treatments at the Riordan-McKenna Institute (RMI) in Southlake, Texas. RMI is Dr. Riordan’s new orthopedic stem cell clinic. For more information, please visit: www.rmiclinic.com

Stem Cell Therapy: Study finds that autologous bone marrow disc injections significantly reduce lumbar disc pain

A study published last year (2015) in the scientific journal Stem Cells entitled “Percutaneous injection of autologous bone marrow concentrate significantly reduces lumbar discogenic pain through 12 months”, reported that patients suffering from chronic back pain due to degenerative disc disease who were treated by injecting their own bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) into their lumbar discs experienced significant pain reduction 12 months after treatment.

Woman Back PainDegenerative disc disease (DDD) is a term used to describe normal changes in spinal discs as one ages. Spinal discs separate the spinal vertebrae and act as shock absorbers that allow the spine to twist, bend and flex. DDD usually affects the discs in the lower back (lumbar) or the neck (cervical).

DDD in lumbar discs can cause lower back pain, osteoarthritis, abnormal disc bulging (herniated disc) and spinal stenosis (narrowing of the tunnel-like space that holds the spinal cord), any of which can exert pressure on spinal nerves and the spinal cord causing pain and affecting nerve function.

BMAC contains mesenchymal stem cells and CD34+ stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote tissue growth including cartilage and CD34+ stem cells can promote tissue vascularization, thus increasing blood supply to new or damaged tissue.

The researchers studied 26 patients who were suffering from discogenic lower back pain. Patients were followed up at 3, 6, and 12 months.

After 12 months, 21 out of 26 patients experienced statistically significant improvements in pain scores and impairment. The most dramatic improvements were seen in patients with higher stem cell counts.

The original publication can be found here: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/stem.1845/epdf

At Riordan-McKenna Institute, Dr. Riordan’s orthopedic stem cell clinic in Dallas-Fort Worth, Dr. McKenna performs a procedure for degenerative disc disease that is similar to the one described in the Stem Cell Journal study.

However, Dr. McKenna augments the BMAC injections with *AlphaGEMS amniotic tissue product. AlphaGEMS is a pliable tissue allograft (transplant) derived from human placental amnion, which contains over 100 growth factors and functions as a biologic structural matrix to facilitate and enhance tissue healing and repair. The inclusion of AlphaGEMS adds a new dimension to the tissue repair process that was successfully tested in the cited study.

“Since we perform lumbar disc injections with BMAC and AphaGEMS at RMI, we are encouraged to see an independent study published that shows the effectiveness of a similar procedure for patients suffering from discogenic lumbar back pain,” states Riordan-McKenna Institute Medical Director, Wade McKenna, DO.

For more information about BMAC and AlphaGEMS treatment at RMI, please visit: http://www.rmiclinic.com/non-surgical-stem-cell-injections-joint-pain/stemnexa-protocol/

If you are suffering from degenerative disc disease and would like to be evaluated for treatment at RMI, the first step is to complete an online medical history. Once we receive it, our staff will contact you to answer general questions and to guide you through the rest of the evaluation process, which usually requires recent MRI images and an MRI report.

https://secureform.rmiclinic.com/forms/13299/3207/VVp7/form.html


*AlphaGEMS tissue is procured from contracted hospitals after normal, healthy births

Recent Study Concludes Patients’ Own Stem Cells with Core Decompression Could Delay or Avoid the Need for Hip Replacement

A recent University of Rome study published in Acta Orhopaedica Belgica entitled “Stage-Related Results In Treatment Of Hip Osteonecrosis With Core-Decompression And Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells” reported that avascular hip necrosis patients treated with a combination of bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) and surgical core decompression experienced significant improvements that could delay or avoid the need for hip replacement.

Femoral Head RoundedOsteonecrosis is the death of bone tissue caused by lack of blood supply to the bone. Another name for osteonecrosis is avascular necrosis. Tiny breaks in the bone caused by avascular necrosis can eventually lead to bone collapse. If the bone is fractures or becomes dislocated, its blood supply can be cut off. Early stage avascular necrosis may be treated with a combination of physical therapy, however most people with avascular necrosis will eventually need surgery including total joint replacement.

Core decompression is surgical procedure that involves removing part of the inside of the bone to relieve pressure and allow new blood vessels to form.

BMAC contains mesenchymal stem cells and CD34+ stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells have been shown to promote tissue growth including cartilage and CD34+ stem cells can promote tissue vascularization, thus increasing blood supply to new or damaged tissue.

The researchers studied 29 patients (31 total hips) with Stage I and Stage II avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head (AVNFH). The femoral head is the “ball” end of the thigh bone that fits into the hip socket. Patients were followed-up for two years after their procedures.

After 2 years, 25 out of 31 hips showed a relief of symptoms and a resolution of the osteonecrosis. The researchers concluded, “…treatment of AVNFH with implantation of autologous concentrated MSCs is indicated for patients at Stage I and Stage II”. They went on to state, “Our results show a significant reduction of joint pain level, and this could take to a delay, or avoid the need, of hip replacement.” Another significant finding was the association of corticosteroid therapy to a larger chance of treatment failure.

The original publication can be found here: http://www.actaorthopaedica.be/acta/download/2015-3/09-Persiani%20et%20al.pdf

At Riordan-McKenna Institute, Dr. McKenna performs a procedure for AVFNH that is similar to the one described in the Italian study. However, Dr. McKenna augments the BMAC injection with AlphaGEMS amniotic tissue product. AlphaGEMS is a pliable tissue allograft (transplant) derived from human placental amnion, which contains over 100 growth factors and functions as a biologic structural matrix to facilitate and enhance tissue healing and repair. The inclusion of AlphaGEMS adds a new dimension to the tissue repair process that was successfully tested in Rome.

“Since we perform core decompression with stem cell therapy at RMI, we are encouraged to see independent study results published that show the effectiveness of a similar procedure for patients with avascular necrosis of the femoral head,” states Riordan-McKenna Institute Medical Director, Wade McKenna, DO.

For more information about BMAC and AlphaGEMS treatment at RMI, please visit: http://www.rmiclinic.com/non-surgical-stem-cell-injections-joint-pain/stemnexa-protocol/

If you are suffering from avascular osteonecrosis of the femoral head and would like to be evaluated for treatment at RMI, the first step is to complete an online medical history. Once they receive it, RMI staff will contact you to answer general questions and to guide you through the rest of the evaluation process, which usually requires recent MRI images and an MRI report.

https://secureform.rmiclinic.com/forms/13299/3207/VVp7/form.html

Study Shows Bone Marrow Stem Cells Help Tennis Elbow

Tennis Elbow

A study published in the Jul-Dec 2014 edition of the Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine entitled Bone marrow injection: A novel treatment for tennis elbow concludes that a single injection of bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) into the elbow lead to significant improvement of patients suffering from tennis elbow.

The study followed 30 patients for 12 weeks and concluded that treatment of tennis elbow patients with single injection of BMA showed a significant improvement in short to medium term follow-up.

Perhaps more importantly, it concluded that, “In future, such growth factors and/or stem cells based injection therapy can be developed as an alternative conservative treatment for patients of tennis elbow, especially who have failed non-operative treatment before surgical intervention is taken.”

Fast forward to the present where at RMI, we are augmenting BMAC with *AlphaGEMS, a proprietary, pliable tissue allograft (transplant) derived from human placental amnion, which functions as a biologic structural matrix to facilitate and enhance tissue healing and repair. AlphaGEMS contains 108 different growth factors including WNT-4 and prostaglandin.

Prostaglandin inhibits inflammation, which occurs after injury and marks the beginning of the healing process. The faster we can tame this inflammation, the sooner the body can move on to the next phase of healing, regeneration. It’s important to note that AlphaGEMS has more than 60 times the amount of prostaglandin compared to other products.

WNT4 is arguably the single most important molecule required for wound healing. AlphaGEMS has more than 10 times the amount of WNT4 as competing products.

For more information about BMAC and AlphaGEMS at the Riordan-McKenna Institute Click Here.

If you are suffering from tennis elbow and would like to be evaluated for treatment, please start by completing our online medical history. Once we receive it, our staff will contact you to answer general questions and guide you through the rest of the application process, which usually includes a in-office evaluation with Dr. McKenna for local patients or a free telephone consultation for those who live further away.

Apply Today

About Tennis Elbow

Tennis elbow is an inflammation of the tendons that join the forearm muscles on the outside of the elbow. The forearm muscles and tendons become damaged from overuse — repeating the same motions again and again. This leads to pain and tenderness on the outside of the elbow. More on Tennis Elbow from AAOS.

About: Bone marrow injection: A novel treatment for tennis elbow

Abstract

Objective:

The objective of this prospective study was assessment of efficacy of bone marrow aspirate (BMA) (containing plasma rich in growth factors and mesenchymal stem cells) injection in treatment of tennis elbow.

Materials and Methods:

A total of 30 adult patients of previously untreated tennis elbow were administered single injection of BMA. This concentrate was made by centrifugation of iliac BMA at 2000 rpm for 20-30 min and only upper layer containing platelet rich plasma and mononuclear cells was injected. Assessment was performed at baseline, 2 weeks, 6 weeks and 12 weeks using Patient-rated Tennis Elbow Evaluation (PRTEE) score.

Results:

Baseline pre-injection mean PRTEE score was 72.8 ± 6.97 which decreased to a mean PRTEE score of 40.93 ± 5.94 after 2 weeks of injection which was highly significant (P < 0.0001). The mean PRTEE score at 6 week and 12 week follow-up was 24.46 ± 4.58 and 14.86 ± 3.48 respectively showing a highly significant decrease from baseline scores (P < 0.0001). Conclusion:

Treatment of tennis elbow patients with single injection of BMA showed a significant improvement in short to medium term follow-up. In future, such growth factors and/or stem cells based injection therapy can be developed as an alternative conservative treatment for patients of tennis elbow, especially who have failed non-operative treatment before surgical intervention is taken.




*Tissue used for AlphaGEMS is donated after normal, healthy births. Once it has been fully tested for infectious diseases, sterility and a few other things, the tissue is processed by using proprietary methods developed by Neil Riordan, PhD.