US FDA Green Lights Second Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy Patient To Receive Human Umbilical Cord Stem Cells In US

(PRWEB) MAY 26, 2016

Cell Dividing in SuspensionAfter several promising treatments in Panama using stem cell technology developed by Medistem Panama Inc. at the City of Knowledge in Panama, a 6 year-old Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy patient received his first umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells in the US earlier this year following FDA approval of a second application for a single patient, investigational new drug (IND) for compassionate use.

Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a rapidly progressive form of muscular dystrophy that occurs primarily in boys. It is caused by an alteration (mutation) in a gene, called the DMD gene, which causes the muscles to stop producing the protein dystrophin. Individuals who have DMD experience progressive loss of muscle function and weakness, which begins in the lower limbs and leads to progressively worsening disability. Death usually occurs by age 25, typically from lung disorders. There is no known cure for DMD.

This trial marks the second time the FDA has granted an investigational allogeneic stem cell IND for Duchenne’s in the United States.

Ryan Benton, the first DMD patient to be treated in the US with umbilical cord stem cells just celebrated his 30th birthday, a landmark age for any Duchenne’s patient. The FDA recently approved a request to increase Ryan’s treatments from two to three times per year. Since his treatments began in September 2014, Ryan’s condition has stabilized and there have not been any adverse side effects reported.

The new subject had traveled to the Stem Cell Institute in Panama several times for treatments similar to Ryan’s. Encouraging results and news of Ryan’s compassionate use trial prompted his parents to seek out a similar trial for him in the US, which was recently granted by the FDA.

Since 2007, The Stem Cell Institute has treated patients with human umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells for autism, cerebral palsy, heart failure, multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and spinal cord injury.

In Panama, the institute is currently providing clinical services for Translational Biosciences’ Institutional Review Board-approved phase 1/2 clinical trials for autism, MS, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and spinal cord injury. It anticipates approvals for cerebral palsy and heart failure trials in the future. For more information about see: Translational Biosciences on ClinicalTrials.gov.

Renowned stem cell scientist Neil H. Riordan, PhD, developed the stem cell technology being utilized in this trial. Dr. Riordan is the founder and president of the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama, and Medistem Panama. Medistem Panama is providing cell harvesting and banking services for this trial.

The Aidan Foundation, a non-profit organization founded by Dr. Riordan in 2004 to provide financial assistance for researching unmet medical needs, is providing financial assistance for this trial.

About Stem Cell Institute Panama

Founded in 2007 on the principles of providing unbiased, scientifically sound treatment options; the Stem Cell Institute (SCI) has matured into the world’s leading adult stem cell therapy and research center. In close collaboration with universities and physicians world-wide, our comprehensive stem cell treatment protocols employ well-targeted combinations of autologous bone marrow stem cells and donor human umbilical cord stem cells to treat: autism, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, heart disease, and autoimmune diseases.

In partnership with Translational Biosciences, a subsidiary of Medistem Panama, SCI provides clinical services for ongoing clinical trials that are assessing safety and signs of efficacy for autism, multiple sclerosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and spinal cord injury using allogeneic umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUC-MSC) and hU-MSC-derived mesenchymal trophic factors (MTF). In the future, Translation Biosciences expects to expand its clinical trial portfolio to include heart disease and cerebral palsy.

For more information on stem cell therapy:

Stem Cell Institute Website: http://www.cellmedicine.com

Stem Cell Institute
Via Israel & Calle 66
Plaza Pacific Office #2A
Panama City, Panama

About Medistem Panama Inc.

Since opening its doors in 2007, Medistem Panama Inc. has developed adult stem cell-based products from human umbilical cord tissue and blood, adipose (fat) tissue and bone marrow. Medistem operates an 8000 sq. ft. ISO 9001-certified laboratory in the prestigious City of Knowledge. The laboratory is fully licensed by the Panamanian Ministry of Health and features 3 class 10000 clean rooms, class 100 laminar flow hoods, and class 100 incubators.

Medistem Panama Website: http://www.medistempanama.com

Medistem Panama Inc.
Ciudad del Saber, Edif. 221 / Clayton
Panama, Rep. of Panama
Phone: +507 306-2601
Fax: +507 306-2601

About Translational Biosciences

A subsidiary of Medistem Panama Inc., Translational Biosciences was founded solely to conduct clinical trials using adult stem cells and adult stem cell-derived products.

Translational Biosciences Web Site: http://www.translationalbiosciences.com

First Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy Patient To Receive Umbilical Cord Stem Cell Therapy In US Turns 30

The first patient with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy to be granted FDA approval for allogeneic adult stem cell therapy in the United States turned 30 this year, well surpassing his original life expectancy and paving the way for future patients, according to non-profit organization Coming Together For A Cure.

Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Patient and Stem Cell Recipient, Ryan Benton

Ryan Benton

WICHITA, KANSAS (PRWEB) MAY 18, 2016 – Ryan Benton was diagnosed with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) at the age of three and given a life expectancy in the late teens to early twenties. DMD is a relatively common progressive genetic disorder, which causes aggressive deterioration of the muscles.

In 2009, at the age of 22, Benton’s condition was critical. He met with the founder of the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama and Medistem Panama, Neil H. Riordan, PhD. Research had shown that adult stem cell therapy might have the potential to reverse the progression of DMD.

Because of the laws restricting adult stem cell therapy in the United States, Benton was forced to travel to Panama to receive his first life-saving treatment. Ryan made seven trips to Panama to receive treatments from Dr. Riordan’s team of physicians at the Stem Cell Institute.

“Ryan has seen vast improvements in muscle mass and lung capacity as a result of his treatments…”

Ryan was assured at the start that there was no guarantee that we would find success but we knew it was his only hope in fighting the disease, especially since his health was at a critical point. Ryan could tell shortly after the first treatment that something was working. He found a renewed strength that he had never felt before and not once did he see any adverse side effects. He trusted Dr. Riordan and felt safe and eager to undergo additional treatments.

It took five years of hard work and successful treatments, but Benton became the first (and only) DMD patient granted FDA approval for this form of medical therapy inside the United States. An investigational new drug (IND) for compassionate use application was approved, allowing Benton to receive treatment in his hometown, Wichita, KS.

Approval from the FDA came with many stipulations, however. This form of treatment was to be used for only a single patient, twice a year for 3 years.

By all accounts, January 2016 was a major milestone. The FDA has recently granted an additional treatment per year, now allowing Ryan three total treatments per year, as well as approval for a second compassionate use IND for another patient. This second patient, a six-year-old boy, has also shown success from previous treatments in Panama. He received his first treatment in the United States this year .

Ryan and his family have been actively involved in the local muscular dystrophy community, and have personally known dozens of others with DMD who have passed away at far too young of an age. That number continues to grow each day, which only continues to frustrate Ryan and his family as they fight for this treatment to be more readily available for others suffering from the same disease. Ryan believes that if treated early enough, patients could have a strong chance to live a “normal” life. Ryan believes if he had been treated when he was six years old, it could be very likely that he would never have faced any of the diseases debilitating effects.

Ryan has seen vast improvements in muscle mass and lung capacity as a result of his treatments, but we believe additional treatments on a more frequent basis would help ensure maximum potential when it comes to reversing the progression of his disease. Immediately following each round of treatment, we see dramatic increases in his overall health, stamina, physical strength, and ease in ability to breathe. Unfortunately, we have found that on average, three to four months after each treatment, the effectiveness of the cells begins to decrease. We believe the FDA’s permission to increase the number of treatments per year will help safeguard Ryan’s ability to preserve his improvements and more effectively control his Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy. Video: Ryan Benton discusses stem cell therapy for DMD
For many families that have lived alongside, or suffered from this disease, this is very exciting news. Ryan and his family are continually heart stricken as they hear of another member of their md community has died far too young due to the disease. It’s their hope they can help provide other families the same opportunities that they were so fortunate to receive.

Coming Together for a Cure, (CTFAC) is a non-profit organization founded by Benton’s siblings, Lauren and Blake after Ryan’s first round of treatments in 2009. In the 7 years since the Bentons were given new hope, they’ve been hard at work raising awareness and support for adult stem cell research and therapy.

To find more information about their organization, their family, or to find out how you can help, please visit http://www.comingtogetherforacure.org

For all other inquiries, please email comingtogetherforacure(at)gmail(dot)com

Modulation of Cytokines in Cancer Patients by Intravenous Ascorbate Therapy

IV-Vitamin-CNina Mikirova, Neil Riordan, Joseph Casciari

Med Sci Monit 2016; 22:14-25
DOI: 10.12659/MSM.895368

BACKGROUND: Cytokines play an important role in tumor angiogenesis and inflammation. There is evidence in the literature that high doses of ascorbate can reduce inflammatory cytokine levels in cancer patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of treatment by intravenous vitamin C (IVC) on cytokines and tumor markers.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: With the availability of protein array kits allowing assessment of many cytokines in a single sample, we measured 174 cytokines and additional 54 proteins and tumor markers in 12 cancer patients before and after a series of IVC treatments.

RESULTS: Presented results show for our 12 patients the effect of treatment resulted in normalization of many cytokine levels. Cytokines that were most consistently elevated prior to treatments included M-CSF-R, Leptin, EGF, FGF-6, TNF-α, β, TARC, MCP-1,4, MIP, IL-4, 10, IL-4, and TGF-β. Cytokine levels tended to decrease during the course of treatment. These include mitogens (EGF, Fit-3 ligand, HGF, IGF-1, IL-21R) and chemo-attractants (CTAC, Eotaxin, E-selectin, Lymphotactin, MIP-1, MCP-1, TARC, SDF-1), as well as inflammation and angiogenesis factors (FGF-6, IL-1β, TGF-1).

CONCLUSIONS: We are able to show that average z-scores for several inflammatory and angiogenesis promoting cytokines are positive, indicating that they are higher than averages for healthy controls, and that their levels decreased over the course of treatment. In addition, serum concentrations of tumor markers decreased during the time period of IVC treatment and there were reductions in cMyc and Ras, 2 proteins implicated in being upregulated in cancer.

Read Full Article…

Stem Cell Treatments for Autism – Danny Briones

Danny Briones discusses his son’s improvements following *umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell treatments at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama.

For more information about autism treatment in Panama, please visit: https://www.cellmedicine.com/stem-cell-therapy-for-autism/

*umbilical cord tissue is donated after normal, healthy births

Why Stem Cells Work: Clinical Trials for Spinal Cord Injury, Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy

Neil Riordan, PhD speaks at the Riordan-McKenna Institute and Stem Cell Institute fall seminar in Southlake, Texas on October 10, 2015.

Dr. Riordan discusses:

  • How our lab selects uses specialized screening techniques to select only the stem cells that we know will be the most useful for our patients. Only about 1 in 100 cords pass this screening process.
  • How umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) control inflammation, modulate the immune system and stimulate regeneration.
  • How the number and function of our own stem cells decline over time.
  • How MSC secretions promote healing
  • Where MSCs are found in our body
  • First clinic trial in the US using umbilical cord tissue-derived stem cells
  • How MSC doubling times dramatically decrease as people age, which is why cord cells are much more robust than a patient’s own cells as they age
  • The origin of Medistem Lab in Panama
  • Why the Stem Cell Institute and Medistem Labs are in Panama
  • Stem cell therapy laws and approvals around the world
  • Global interest in mesenchymal stem cell therapy research
  • Current clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells
  • Clinical trials in Panama
  • Collaborations with corporations and educational institutions
  • Mesenchymal stem cell selection, donor selection, and testing
  • Brief tour of Medistem Panama stem cell laboratory
  • Isolation and production of mesenchymal stem cells
  • Discovery of mesenchymal stem cells in menstrual blood
  • Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell studies for rheumatoid arthritis
  • The role of T-regulatory cells in rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis
  • Treating spinal cord injuries with mesenchymal stem cells
  • Mechanism of mesenchymal stem cells on spinal cord injury. They are not becoming tissue. It’s their secretions that allow the spinal cord to heal itself.
  • Umbilical cord MSC studies on spinal cord injury
  • Data from Stem Cell Institute spinal cord injury patients
  • Video from treated spinal cord injury patients
  • Postnatal MSC safety
  • MSCs and cancer risk – MSCs have been shows to actually inhibit tumor growth

Multiple Sclerosis patient, Sam Harrell has no more use for his walker after stem cell therapy!

Here is an update from Sam Harrell who was speaking at our public seminar in Southlake, Texas in October, 2015. Sam has been to the Stem Cell Institute in Panama several times for umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell therapy.

The beginning is about as inspirational at it gets! Go Sam!

“I used to need this [walker] get out of the house. Now, it needs me!” – Sam Harrell

Josh’s Journey to the Stem Cell Institute in Panama for Spinal Cord Injury Treatment

Follow Josh’s Blog http://joshsrecovery.blogspot.com

Monday, October 5, 2015

Josh Rivers Weights“Ok these stem cells might really be kicking in now! One of the leg machines I use I have only been able to do 30lbs max, over the last few months of going to the gym 3 times a week. Today all of a sudden I am able to do 70!!!!??? I am really in shock right now to see an increase like this out of nowhere.. just 2 days ago I was struggling with 30!! I was also able to add more weight to 2 out of the other 4 leg machines I use. I can’t believe it!!”

Note: The stem cell treatment protocol Josh underwent included multiple intravenous and intrathecal (into the spinal fluid) injections of umbilical cord tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells and his own bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells administered over the course of one month. For more information about stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury, visit: https://www.cellmedicine.com/stem-cell-therapy-for-spinal-cord-injury/

After stem cell therapy in Panama, former motocross champ aims for handcycling glory at 2020 Paralympics in Tokyo

Blake Colleton on Bike

By Ashleigh Stevenson Original Story Here

A former up-and-coming motocross champion who broke his back during a crash is aiming to represent Australia at the Tokyo Paralympics in a different sport.

Blake Colleton, 18, from Murwillumbah in northern New South Wales, fell during a motocross race in Victoria last year, resulting in paraplegia from the chest down.

He has taken up handcycling as part of his rehabilitation and is aiming to compete at the 2020 Paralympics in Japan.

Mr Colleton said he did not realise the extent of his injury when it first happened.

“It wasn’t too bad at first and then it sort of hit me a little bit when I was in hospital what actually had happened to myself,” he said.

“I was still happy with life and knew that it was just a change in direction – I just have to move on.

Karren Colleton with son, Blake Colleton

Karren Colleton with son, Blake Colleton

“I need to keep working hard and doing it for myself – not anyone else, just me.

“I was racing motocross professionally before the accident, so it’s just a change in direction for me.

“I definitely want to get to the Paralympics.”

In January, Mr Colleton and his mother Karen travelled to Panama in Central America so he could undergo stem cell treatment.

The therapy involved the intravenous and intrathecal (into the spinal fluid) injection of mesenchymal stem cells from human umbilical cord tissue and his own bone marrow.

The treatment is not available in Australia.

Karen Colleton said they hoped to return to Panama for a second round of treatment later this year.

“He’s got a lot more core muscle and lower back control, which helps so much when you’re a paraplegic,” Ms Colleton said.

“We’re hoping the second lot of treatment will move the injury lower to maybe bring back bladder and bowel function and lower body function.”

What are the sources of the stem cells used at Stem Cell Institute in Panama?

Lately, especially on our Facebook Page many people are asking us, “What is the source of the stem cells?”

Stem cells under fluorescent microscope.At the Stem Cell Institute, we use two types of stem cells. Primarily, we use allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells harvested from human umbilical cord tissue. In addition to allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells, our spinal cord injury protocol uses autologous (patient’s own) stem cells harvested from bone marrow.

Umbilical cord tissue is donated by mothers after normal, healthy births.

All donating mothers are tested for infectious diseases and have their medical histories screened. We obtain proper consent from each family prior to umbilical cord donation.

All mesenchymal stem cells harvested from umbilical cords are screened for infectious diseases to International Blood Bank Standards before they are approved for use in treatments.

A small number of umbilical cords (about 1 in 10) pass our rigorous screening process.

Dr. Riordan on the Umbilical Cord Selection Process at Stem Cell Institute

“Through retrospective analysis of our cases, we’ve identified proteins and genes that allow us to screen several hundred umbilical cord donations to find the ones that we know are most effective. We only use these cells and we call them ‘golden cells’.

We go through a very high throughput screening process to find cells that we know have the best anti-inflammatory activity, the best immune modulating capacity, and the best ability to stimulate regeneration.”

What are the advantages of treating with allogeneic human umbilical cord tissue (HUCT)-derived mesenchymal stem cells?

  • Anyone can be treated since HUCT mesenchymal stem cells are immune system privileged. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) matching is not necessary.
  • The stem cells with the best anti-inflammatory activity, immune modulating capacity, and ability to stimulate regeneration can be screened and selected.
  • Allogeneic stem cells can be administered multiple times over the course of days in uniform dosages that contain high cell counts.
  • Umbilical cord tissue provides an abundant supply of mesenchymal stem cells.
  • No need to collect stem cells through invasive procedures such as liposuction or bone marrow collection
  • There is a growing body of evidence showing that mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cords are more robust than mesenchymal stem cells from other sources such as fat.

The body’s immune system is unable to recognize human umbilical cord tissue (HUCT)-derived mesenchmyal stem cells as foreign and therefore they are not rejected. HUCT stem cells have been administered thousands of times at the Stem Cell Institute and there has never been a single instance rejection (graft vs. host disease). Umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells also proliferate/differentiate more efficiently than “older” cells, such as those found in the fat and therefore, they are considered to be more “potent”.

Watch Professor Arnold Caplan from Case Western Reserve University explain how this works.

Stem Cell Therapy for Autism – “We also had SPECT scans done before and after treatment and the brain changes were noticeable!”

Sondra Lee Facebook

My son underwent his first treatment in March of this year (he has autism and is verbal) and he absolutely LOVED it! He totally knew it was helping him. Each day he would walk in and wait for the doctor to receive his stem cells. We are planning a second trip this fall.

We noticed changes immediately but it can take some time as the body accepts the stem cells and adapts. His long-standing gut issues are gone. We also had SPECT scans done before and after treatment and the brain changes were noticeable! Much of the scalloping that had been present was gone.

If I didn’t think it was helpful I wouldn’t bother going back. The people of Panama are very kind, we felt totally safe, the clinic was impeccable and the staff was helpful and friendly.