Stem Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis – Jennifer’s Story on Treatment in Panama

Hi. My name is Jennifer and I’ve been diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS) since 2003. I started coming to the Stem Cell Institute last year, 2017, in January. My second treatment was in August of last year and now I am here for my third treatment [May 2018].

“I feel strongly that I wouldn’t be where I am here today. I would have been in a wheelchair.”

From my first treatment, I saw major improvements as far as being able to stand without wobbling or bouncing back and forth. I also can feel my toes. I also have more bladder control. The second treatment, I didn’t really see much improvement like I did the first. The first was major. But now I am here for my third and I’m trying to go within six to seven, eight months the most in between my treatments until I see, let’s say 70% improvement.

So, thank you and I support the Stem Cell Institute, and I feel strongly that I wouldn’t be where I am here today. I would have been in a wheelchair.

Stem Cell Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis

Image of Stem Cell Therapy Patient Marth Phillips

A Miracle for Martha
A woman’s journey of deliverance from pain

By Deanna Kirk Daily Sun Nov 26, 2017 (Link to original story)

The last 12 months have been a giant series of ups and downs, an extreme roller coaster for Martha Phillips.

Last December, her father-in-law battled brain cancer, which affected the lives of all of her close family; and her only brother died very suddenly from a pulmonary embolism. They were buried a week apart.

The battle with Multiple Sclerosis

Martha had been fighting her own battle against Multiple Sclerosis since a diagnosis in 2010. This disease causes the body’s immune system to attack its own tissues, and the malfunction destroys myelin, the fatty substance that coats and protects nerve fibers in the brain and spinal cord, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Phillips’ had seen her own ups and downs in that battle as well, with medications that caused huge weight gain, severe intolerance to heat, and intense bouts with pain. She tried many different protocols and medications, but what seemed to make the most difference was an extreme dietary change, which led to a loss of 72 pounds, acupuncture, adjustments, and regular massage therapy. Under the care of Dr. William “Doc” Davis in Ennis, she went from 10 prescriptions down to two, and did quite well for nearly six years.

But after the bout with all the stress during December 2016, Phillips discovered her body just could not cope with all the continuous stress demands placed upon it, and she suffered a pretty severe setback. She was forced to go on disability from her job.

“The Tysybri I was having infused regularly has a black box warning,” Phillips said. “I had to sign paperwork when I started taking it, that I knew it could kill me.”

The neurologist offered several other choices of medications, but all were either equally as risky with not as many good results, or more risky with even worse results.

“To me, it felt like my only choice was going backwards, and to me that was unacceptable,” she said.

Phillips learned about a somewhat-new innovative treatment for people with Multiple Sclerosis, and it was not being done in the United States yet, but for $25,000 one could fly to Panama City, Panama and have the complete treatment done and stay right in the same hotel where the treatments are done.

The blessings of how all her funding came together to have the treatment were chronicled in a story that ran in the July 8, 2017 edition of the Daily Sun.

But this story is about the trip itself, the treatment, and how her life has been since the trip to Panama.

Life since Panama, and new stem cells

It’s been roughly three months since Phillips returned from Panama. She took her little sister Robine Reeves with her, and the things she noticed right off were 1) the Atlanta airport is awful, and 2) Panama is a lot like Texas with regard to the weather.

“It’s very Americanized — they take American dollars, Spanish is their primary language but it’s OK if you don’t speak it,” Phillips said. “The people in Panama are so super friendly, even the kids. A group of junior high kids got on the bus with us and many of them spoke to us. That was the day Vice President Pence was there, and we, stupid Americans, didn’t know he was there, but his motorcade was very impressive.”

Phillips notice that the Panamanian president’s motorcade also came through that morning, and they watched it all from the rooftop of their hotel where the pool was. And some guy from London had to tell them their own Vice President was there.

“The clinic has a very impressive concierge,” she said. “Someone was there holding a sign with my name on it at the airport. She took us to the VIP lounge and whisked us through customs and the fingerprint deal very quickly and painlessly, and called our driver who works for the clinic. He took us to the hotel, and showed us shopping and restaurants along the way.

“They don’t have really good restaurants, they just look for consistency,” she said.

“The next day, I had a medical checkup and blood work. The second day, they gave me stem cells through an IV. I also had two subcutaneous injections in the groin/lymph region, which were more painful than the IV.”

Phillips also had physical therapy that day which consisted of evaluation, stretching exercises, balance and strength.

“The stems cells they use are umbilical cord stem cells, which women donate when they give birth,” she said. “Since they are brand new, they double every 24 hours. They’re a perfect source because they multiply so fast. I got 1.33 million stem cells.”

The way the stem cells work for MS and some other autoimmune diseases they’re using them for is that they reset the immune system, she said. They do not go in and repair the damage the MS has already done to her brain, but there is scientific evidence that shows if MS stops attacking the body, the body can heal the brain and spinal lesions.

“They believe that because there’s another virus that does the same kind of damage to your brain, but because it does not continue to attack the brain, people recover from it,” Phillips said.

There was another day of treatment just like the previous day, then the following day the sisters flew home. On the day of the blood work and checkup, the doctor discussed diet and supplements with Martha.

“He started describing a high fat, low carb diet, and I said, ‘Do you mean a keto diet?’ and he said ‘Yes,’” she said. “He said I would be throwing my $25,000 down the drain if I did NOT follow this diet and take supplements.”

Phillips had already followed this diet in the past, but wasn’t following it very strictly at the time.

Her supplement list looked something like this: 2000 mg per day of Magnesium; B vitamins; CoQ10; Stemkline; Probiotics; and a lot of it is supposed to be for energy as well as for brain health.

“When I went to Panama, I was taking 10 prescriptions,” she said. “I am taking one now, 90 days later.

“That all actually happened within the first two weeks.

“I feel amazing. I feel like I can conquer the world. I’ve had more energy than I’ve had the entire time I’ve had MS.”

Philips said when she made her trip to Panama, her thought was if she could get rid of enough of the pain and fatigue in order to return to work, she would be happy.

“But I got SO much more — I actually have no symptoms right now.”

She’s also no longer a slave to heat intolerance. Before, when she went to CrossFit, she had to wear a cooling vest full of ice packs and stand in front of a giant fan or A/C unit in order to work out. The least little bit of heat would cause her to become very, very sick.

“The first time I worked out after my transplant, Nick (Biles) came over to check on me, and I cried and said ‘I can’t remember the last time I worked out without heat intolerance,’” she said.

The heat intolerance makes the MS Symptoms you have temporarily worse until your body cools down. That can happen with one degree of change in body temperature, she said.

“It’s really weird to me now, to learn how to live without thinking about all those things,” Phillips said. “For so long, I’ve had to consider all sorts of eventualities in every scenario I find myself in.”

Dallas Morning News Features Stem Cell Institute Multiple Sclerosis Patient Judy Lecoq

Image of Stem Cell Therapy MS Patient Judy Lecoq

Judi Lecoq, 57, of Arlington, has been traveling to Panama once a year since 2010 for umbilical cord stem cell treatments to treat her multiple sclerosis — an option that’s not available in the U.S. Because the treatment is controversial and not FDA-approved, she must pay for the medical costs as well as travel. But Lecoq sees improvement with each treatment and says she’s doing much better than doctors originally predicted when she was diagnosed 20 years ago.

“When I come back, I feel a complete change in my energy level,” she says. “Before my last trip, it was hard to get anything done or to concentrate. My feet were numb; they’re not numb anymore.”

From – Ticket to Health: Do your homework before traveling for medical procedures

Read/download the entire chapter on stem cell therapy for multiple sclerosis from Dr. Riordan’s book

Image of Book Cover for Stem Cell Thearpy - Rising Tide

For more detailed information about our MS treatments, we welcome you to read/download the entire chapter on stem cell therapy for MS from Dr. Riordan’s new book, Stem Cell Therapy: A Rising Tide – How Stem Cells are Disrupting Medicine and Transforming Lives.  CLICK HERE (FREE PDF)

“Neil takes readers on a riveting journey through the past, present and future of stem cell therapy. His well-researched, educational and entertaining book could change your life. I highly recommend it.”Tony Robbins, NY Times #1 Bestselling Author

“100 years old will soon become the new 60. Stem cells are a key therapeutic to enable this future. Dr. Riordan’s book is your guide to why this is true and how you will benefit. A must read for anyone who cares about extending their healthy lifespan.”Peter H. Diamandis, MD; Founder, XPRIZE & Singularity University; Co-Founder, Human Longevity, Inc.; Author of NY Times Best Sellers Abundance and Bold

Stem Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis – Joyce Adair

Joyce discusses her progress after mesenchymal stem cell therapy at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama.

Interviewer: Today is July 28th, 2017. Can you give me your full name and diagnosis?

Joyce: Yes. My name is Joyce Adair and I was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.

Interviewer: So, this is your second treatment?

Joyce: Yes.

Interviewer: Could you tell me your experience after the first treatment?

Joyce: Well, after the first treatment last year in April of 2016, I noticed a big change in my energy. I was able to finally go out and do things with my family and friends that I had been unable to do for years. I noticed a change with my pain level. It didn’t go completely away but it did get better and I was able to cut back on some of my medications at that time.

Interviewer: And you also mentioned that you stopped using a wheelchair?

Joyce: Oh, yes. I wasn’t using the wheelchair. I was able to walk on my own – not using a cane or anything at that time. I could put full weight on my legs.

Interviewer: We just finished your second treatment. Can you mention if you have had any improvements this week?

Joyce: I’ve had a lot of improvement this week. When I came on Sunday, I was in terrible pain. I was even unsure if I should come or not because I was afraid to travel on the plane with the amount of pain that I was having in my right leg. But once I had my first treatment this week, I noticed a big change in my pain and I also have noticed a big change in my energy. I have a lot more energy and I can tell that it’s definitely getting better.

Interviewer: Thank you very much.

Sam Harrell at Texas State House Public Hearing on Stem Cell Therapy HB810

Multiple Sclerosis patient and stem cell therapy recipient, Sam Harrell, speaks before the Texas State House Public Health Committee about how stem cell therapy at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama improved his life.

Sam’s testimony:

Chairman my name is Sam Harrell. I’m from Ennis Texas. I represent myself and I’m here in favor of House Bill 810. I’m just a football coach. That’s all I’ve ever been. There’s nothing easy about that but it’s all I’ve ever wanted to do, and I love what I do, and I’m doing what I love. I feel like the luckiest guy in the world. But I’d done that all my life and I was head coach in Ennis Texas, and everything was going great, and I had all these big plans and dreams, and in 2005 I was diagnosed with MS. At first it didn’t show up much so my wife and I didn’t tell a lot of people, but from 2005 to 2009 I’d gone where you couldn’t even notice anything to coaching out of a golf cart. Couldn’t stand up, couldn’t walk on my own, so in 2009 I had to retire from coaching, and in 2010 I had to retire completely from education, not because I wanted to, but because of MS.

During that time I was going to see the best guys, and they’re great guys in Dallas, and their heart’s in the right place, and they had me on MS meds and obviously not much was helping. That’s what they tell you about the meds. They won’t get you better. They just hope to slow it down.

Well, from 2005 to 2009, I went from coaching and walking and working out in the sun to not being able to walk and sit at home using a walker every day, so that slow down process wasn’t very slow in my mind. A friend of mine told me about Preston Walker, who went down to Central America for stem cells. Fortunately, in 2010, I found myself in Panama getting stem cells, and I fast-forwarded to 2014. I was doing so well again that I said, “I think I could coach again.” And I started again at Fort Worth Christian high school, and I’ve being doing that for the last three years. I get up every day, throw on my shorts and my tennis shoes and move again, and I never dreamed I’d do that. And it’s all because of adult stem cells in Panama. And that’s why I’m for this bill, house bill 810. I appreciate your time so much.

Stem Cell Therapy for Multiple Sclerosis – Wes Meadlock

Transcription from Telephone Interview with MS stem cell patient, Wes Meadlock.

I’ll start from the beginning and tell you what I know.

In 2011, I started feeling something was wrong, and went to a neurologist here in town, went to his MRIs, and all his little testing, and this and that, and he said, “You’ve either got Lyme’s disease or MS.” The reason they said Lyme disease is because we have a place deep in the woods, and we stay there a lot on the weekends for a couple of years, and I got a lot of tick bites. We went through the whole thing of MS or Lyme’s disease, so I was thinking, maybe that’s what I got?

I’m not quite normal but I’m pretty close, at 80-85% of being normal. …but compared to some other people I know who have MS that I’ve done some aquatic classes with, I am far superior to them. I really believe this stuff works.

In the meantime, my father’s wife has had cancer pretty bad a couple of times, and he knows a lot of people at U. of Alabama at Birmingham; a really good hospital. He said, “I know somebody up here who’s really good with MS, why don’t you come up here and have him test you.” So, I went up there in the fall of 2012 and he did his testing, and he was telling me, “You have MS.” He said he could get me into some clinical trials, and I was thinking, “I don’t like pharmaceutical drugs.” I said, “If I could find something else, some other way, I’m going to try it.” I’ve been doing a lot of Internet research and talked to a few other people who said you should try some stem cells, so I did that. I went to Panama the first time. I did the liposuction, and they tried to get 90 million cells from me, and they could only get 45 million. I’m rather thin and wasn’t in too good a health at the time. They said, “We’ll mix it with some umbilical cord to get you the 90 million, so you’ll get 45 of your own and 45 of umbilical, and I think that was a two week ordeal to get that treatment.

I came back home and was feeling so much better. At that particular point I was having a problem walking with my left leg not cooperating, so when I came back from there, I felt like I’d gotten a good bit better. So, I decided to go back the following year. 2013 was the first time I went, and in 2014 they said, “Do you want to do umbilical?” I said no I do not, so they said they’d try something else. It turned out to be the umbilical cord cells, and when I got done a doctor told me, “You should be good for three years.” That’s where I am now, and I decided in the last few months that I need to go back again. When I called they said they had an opening on March the 13th and I said, “Okay, I’ll take it.” I just felt like, basically I don’t do any other drug, and I do believe it helps. The only one I do now is Naltrexone. It’s a 4.5mg dose of that and it sure helps my coordination and my walking. I’m not quite normal but I’m pretty close, at 80-85% of being normal. That’s about where I am now.

I’m not 100% but compared to some other people I know who have MS that I’ve done some aquatic classes with, I am far superior to them. I really believe this stuff works.

When I went back the second time, I’ve noticed a lot of difference there, I’m a full believer that stuff pulled from your own fat, and I’m 62 years old, can’t be as good as umbilical cord stuff and the way they process it. When I first started this they did nothing like it in the states, but they’re doing the liposuction stuff now. I went to a doctor close by here and told him my story, and he was trying to sell his products so he was against my story, but I said, “You need to do a little more research, because what you’re saying isn’t true. I’m a true testament.”

After I talked to him and he fed me a big line of BS, and I said, “You don’t even know what you’re talking about. You do in a sense and you’re trying to sell your product, I understand that, but you’re not hitting the whole base, that’s for sure.”

Stem Cell Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis – Jason Upshaw with Neil Riordan, PhD

MS Patient, Jason Upshaw and his wife, Michelle discuss his stem cell treatments at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama with founder and chief scientist, Neil Riordan, PhD. Jason was diagnosed with MS 21 years ago.

Transcript:

Jason: The very first time I came it was relapsing/remitting, and it progressed to secondary progressive, and that was the second trip that we came. I haven’t actually felt this good in years. I have no MS symptoms whatsoever, other than a bit of heat fatigue, still, but other than that, no numbness; no tingling; and I haven’t felt this good in years.

Jason: When I went the first time, it was to Costa Rica at y’all’s clinic and they had to put me on the plane in a wheelchair, and they had to transfer me between flights in a wheel chair. I couldn’t walk from here to the door without being exhausted and I still had a lot of numbness and tingling. When I got home from that trip I walked off the plane, got my own luggage, and walked out to the parking lot to the car that was waiting for us. It improved my life in one treatment.

Jason: Um, of course the numbness and tingling gradually went away, I haven’t had any numbness or tingling in years. The fatigue has gotten a lot better. A lot of it, if I’m smart, I don’t have any symptoms. I know my limits and if I push them too far… but I don’t think it’s just the MS. When you get tired, your body shuts down. I don’t blame a lot of it on MS. It’s just that when I get started, I just like to go, go, go, go. If I push it too far, I pay for it, but if I’m smart, I don’t go too far.

Dr. Riordan: You first came in August of 2008. When did you come a second time, in 2010? So, you felt the need to come back in 2010, so what were the symptoms like then?

Jason: The numbness and tingling wasn’t an issue. I could tell that I was dealing with more fatigue than I had been, so before I got down to where I was [before], I wanted to get a head start on it, so I came back. The heat was really bothering me then. My gait when I was walking… people could tell I wasn’t doing as well anymore. So before I got to rock bottom, to where I was before, I went to Costa Rica, I thought I’d get back down here and try to get ahead of the curve, and I’ve been going back ever since.

Jason: Yeah. I live in Texas so it’s going to be hot, but I think because of my medical history I have to pay closer attention than most, but for anyone if you stay out in the heat too long, you’re going to get drained. You’re going to get tired. It affects me more so than somebody without MS, but like I said, if I’m smart now and listen to my body, I really don’t have any problems.

Michelle: I’ve been with Jason through every step in this and with all his physicians in the states, and I would send anybody here. It’s extremely loving first of all, extremely hands-on in trying to help you.

Even if you need a glass of water, it’s not a bother, just little things like that. Extremely professional, wanting to make sure you go that extra step and know what you’re dealing with, that you’re not afraid of what you’re fixing to do. Being on the opposite end of this and not being the one who’s being treated you feel helpless, but here I haven’t felt helpless with anything Jason’s needed to go through. Everybody’s been so reassuring and reaffirming, and there’s been no questions. And if there are questions, they get answered. It’s a night and day difference. We’re not just a number, or a name, or the money being paid to make this happen. It’s truly being done because y’all care and it works! It just truly works, and I’d send anyone here in a heartbeat. The therapy of it, the physical therapy, it’s not you just go and exercise. You’re taught life skill exercise you can use until you’re 100 years old if you live that long, and continue to be stronger and better.

Jason: I’d like to qualify this: in the US I’ve had some of the best MS specialists that there are, who are still good friends of mine, but… it’s… my experience with MS in the United States is that they treat the symptoms and don’t look for a cure. I’ve been on every MS medication that there is, the last time I checked, and honestly the side effects were worse than what they were trying to fix, a lot of it. They weren’t doing anything. They said that the goal of each one of those was to lengthen the amount of time between relapses, which means you’re still going to have a relapse.

When we came here, I want to fix the problem. That’s what we found here. I speak to people with MS on a daily basis. I could make a full time job out of answering emails and phone calls about what stem cells have done for me, and I spend a great deal of time doing that. I don’t endorse the clinic, I don’t get paid a penny for doing it, but to me that would be the most selfish thing in the world to know it works if I didn’t take the time to share my story with other MS patients.

Y’all have changed my life. I’m back. I’m still in law enforcement. I work a 40 hour week that seems like a vacation. I’m not a proud man. The day my boss gave me my badge and gun back I cried like a baby because that was really the only thing that I’d ever given up on. I don’t give up. I never thought, ‘I won’t walk again,’ even when specialists told me, ‘Jason you might not walk again,’ because all that would do is make me more mad and more determined. The only thing that I nearly gave up on was never being able to wear a badge and gun again, and you guys gave me that back.

Every day when I take that first step it actually means something. It’s not I have to go to work tomorrow. I get to go to work tomorrow. It changes your whole thinking. She was talking about the staff. I get to tell people every time I talk to them that this is the finest group of doctors I ever dealt with. I’ve had some outstanding doctors in the US, but as far as… I’ll put the doctors here up against anyone in the world. The caring, the professionalism, if you have a question, they have an answer, and it’s… speaking from experience when I went to Costa Rica I was scared to death. I tried everything for my MS and nothing was working. I decide one day I’ve tried it all. I’d read about the clinic from another law enforcement officer who’d kept a blog about every day he spent in Costa Rica, which I followed religiously. I sent my application before he even got back and was approved. I met Preston Walker, the day after he got back was the day before I was supposed to leave. It was wonderful meeting him; if someone told you he had MS you wouldn’t know it to look at him, and he had the same results I did, and he’s still working today. But it was scary. I’m a country boy, I was raised on a farm, and for me to get on a plane to another country to get medical care down there… we all hear the horror stories. But after my first visit with the doctors I was at ease and it’s the finest group of doctors I’ve ever been associated with.

Michelle: And we’ve heard that from everybody. We have a group of people from every time we were here. I keep a group of people and stay in contact, and everybody is happy. Everybody who is dealing with children who have patients here to adults… we tell everyone when we were coming here that we were going on a family reunion because that’s just how we feel. This is like a family for us. Y’all have loved us and stood there with us through the hardest times and helped us have our life back and to us, that’s family.

Jason: We sat in our driveway and cried the day I sold my electric scooter because that was the only way I could get around. We sold it and when the gentleman come picked it up, we sat in our driveway and cried. It was so good to see that go, it was a godsend when I needed it, but it was so good seeing that go.

I’ll stand on top of the highest mountain and sing your praises to anyone that will listen, because like I said, it would be the most selfish thing in the world if I didn’t. I don’t just think it works, I’m walking proof that it works. I’ve talked to hundreds of people who have ended up coming down here, and I won’t say that everyone’s had the same results that I’ve had, but I can only think of two out of hundreds who just flat-out said it didn’t work.

That was my whole philosophy when I came down, I was so scared of getting my hopes up. I saw it worked for Preston Walker, but I’d been giving every witch potion you can think of saying this is going to make it all better. Medicine or herbal it didn’t matter. All I could see it was draining my checking account and not helping me at all. Of the hundreds I’ve talked to, with all but two, have said they were much better when they got back. I told myself if I had a better quality of life when I got home, then it worked. I don’t care how big or how small, if I had a better quality of life then it worked, and boy did it.

Michelle: If it didn’t work we wouldn’t be coming back for maintenance. If I can advise a spouse that is wanting to help in any way, this is not a miracle cure. This is something like with anything you do to change your life and make that commitment. This is going to give you the tools and everything you need and it’s going to jumpstart you to such a level – that you have that will and desire to go again that it’s given him. It’s your responsibility when you’re given that gift, You have to take care of it. You have to maintain it and nurture it. I think that’s why Jason’s been so successful; coming in with his mind-frame, when he got that gift with the stem cells. He’s taken it and he’s taking care of that gift and has nurtured it and that’s why we keep coming back; to boost it and keep it going.

Jason: When I was coming back I told my Sheriff, my boss, that I was coming back, and he’s seen me at my worst and my best because I’ve been working for the same place for seventeen years. When I told him I was coming back down, he got a very concerned look at first like, ‘are you not doing okay?’ and I laughed. It’s the joke around the office that I haven’t felt this good in years. I’m going down for a tune-up, and they all got a good laugh out of that. That’s how I see it. I’m getting a tune-up and I’ll keep coming down for it as long as you’ll have me.

Michelle: When I say I love you guys, and I haven’t met y’all, it’s because you’ve meant so much to me. I married this man not-healthy, walking with the assistance of a cane or a walker. I was the one who got to pick him up at the airport that day, and watch him walk upright like the strong man that he is for the very first time and it was wonderful. So that was the most wonderful thing anybody can have. So I’ve loved y’all since that moment.

“Best decision I ever made” – Tati Ali about stem cell therapy for multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis

Tati Ali RA and MS

I went to Panama City, Panama and received 92.4 million Umbilical Cord Stem Cells to treat my Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, and osteoarthritis. Best decision I’ve ever made. Before Umbilical Cord Stem Cells, I spent every single night crying in pain. I was depressed for several years. I was planning my own death before I reached 30 years of age. I’m only 26 years old. Now, I was a given a new chance because stem cells. Everyone around me knows I’ve changed. It has been 3 months since treatment. Now, I strength train. I’ve had Juvenile RA my entire life and MS for 6 years. – Tati Ali

Multiple Sclerosis patient, Sam Harrell has no more use for his walker after stem cell therapy!

Here is an update from Sam Harrell who was speaking at our public seminar in Southlake, Texas in October, 2015. Sam has been to the Stem Cell Institute in Panama several times for umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell therapy.

The beginning is about as inspirational at it gets! Go Sam!

“I used to need this [walker] get out of the house. Now, it needs me!” – Sam Harrell

MS patient’s quality of life improvement “unbelievable” after stem cell therapy

Cathy Duke's Testimonial - with comment

“Thank you everyone for your kind words. Stem cells did not cure my MS, but they have improved my quality of life so much it is unbelievable. I have always had the support of my family and friends, and for this, I have been VERY appreciative. Stem cell therapy has given me a new quality of life and I thank God, my family and Dr. Neil Riordan at the Stem Cell Institute in Panama City, Panama. Life is good :-)”Cathy Miller Duke

“Last year on this day, my mom wasn’t able to participate in the Mackinac Bridge walk because, at exactly this time, she was in Panama receiving stem cell therapy, hoping it would improve her quality of life. Today, she was able to participate and walk that bridge…without a cane. (And apparently, she walked backwards a little jogged some too!) So proud of you mom!”Michelle Duke Thompson